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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2017

Dieter Sage

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Logistics and Supply-Chain Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-8572-4563-2

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2018

Atieh Poushneh and Arturo Z. Vasquez-Parraga

This study aims to answer the following question: How can customer readiness be instrumental in non-technology-based service delivery?

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to answer the following question: How can customer readiness be instrumental in non-technology-based service delivery?

Design/methodology/approach

Using a field study, this research examines the role of customer readiness in customer participation in non-technology-based service delivery and its indirect effects on such customer outcomes as perceived service quality, customer satisfaction and customer willingness to recommend.

Findings

The results show that customer readiness is a second-order construct. It has a significant impact on customer participation in service delivery, which in turn impacts three key service outcomes: customer perceived service quality, customer satisfaction and customer willingness to recommend. Four factors influencing customer readiness (consumer previous experience, consumer desire for control, consumer perceived risk and customer organizational socialization) are also empirically evaluated.

Research limitations/implications

Some limitations of the study are related to sample size and use of a type of services. The research tested 13 hypotheses with a limited sample size in one context. A better representation of the population and a more generalizable outcome require more representative samples and studies in various contexts such as banking, hotel services or health care services. This study demonstrated the importance of customer readiness for effective participation in non-technology-based service delivery; it does not address the impact of customer readiness on participation in the context of technology-based services. Future research may also shed light on when and why customers choose technology-based services versus non-technology-based services.

Practical implications

Effective customer participation in service delivery can, and should, benefit from boosting customer readiness.

Originality/value

This research shows the impact of customer readiness on non-technology-based service delivery, more specifically, the impact of customer readiness on customer participation in this type of service delivery. Customer readiness has been found to be beneficial in the provision of technology-based services; yet, its role in the provision of non-technology-based services has not been thoroughly evaluated.

Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Jinsoo Hwang and Ja Young (Jacey) Choe

This paper aims to explore the types of perceived risks involved with using drone food delivery services. Furthermore, this study investigates the relationship between…

3184

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the types of perceived risks involved with using drone food delivery services. Furthermore, this study investigates the relationship between perceived risk and image of drone food delivery services. Lastly, this study examines the effect of image of drone food delivery services on desire, intentions to use and willingness to pay more.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected data from 331 respondents in Korea. Before the start of the survey, the respondents were given a video, which made it easier for them to understand drone food delivery services.

Findings

The three types of perceived risks (i.e. time risk, performance risk and psychological risk) have a negative influence on image of drone food delivery services and, thus, aids in increasing desire, intentions to use and willingness to pay more.

Originality/value

The concept of perceived risk was applied to the context of drone food delivery services in this study in combination with other understudied concepts, image, desire, intentions to use and willingness to pay more. This study is one of the first studies that applied those significant concepts to the context of drone food delivery services, even though there are a large number of papers in the technology field. Thus, the findings of this study will be important to foodservice companies when building successful drone food delivery services.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Sandra P. Price, Anne Morris and J. Eric Davies

There has been a proliferation in commercial electronic document delivery services. Over the past few years this consistent growth, combined with enhancements to existing…

Abstract

There has been a proliferation in commercial electronic document delivery services. Over the past few years this consistent growth, combined with enhancements to existing services, has made it difficult for librarians to keep abreast of the latest developments and service availability. This paper presents an overview of document delivery services and suppliers, and provides discussion on the various types currently available. The paper is further divided into non‐collection‐based services, collection‐based services and specialised collection‐based services. Detailed information about particular services has been collated and presented in tabular form: this includes information regarding cost, delivery time, subject field and full contact details.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Scott W. Kelley

Explains that efficient service delivery can often present aproblem for marketers due to the nature of the services. Summarizes thetwo general methods already suggested…

1330

Abstract

Explains that efficient service delivery can often present a problem for marketers due to the nature of the services. Summarizes the two general methods already suggested for improving the efficiency of service delivery – technological and humanistic. Discusses managerial guidelines for the implementation of these approaches to service delivery in several service industries, based on two service classification schemes.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Oludele Akinloye Akinboade, Emilie Chanceline Kinfack and Mandisa Putuma Mokwena

The purpose of this paper is to analyze citizen satisfaction with public service delivery in the Sedibeng district municipality of South Africa. The municipality consists…

4056

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze citizen satisfaction with public service delivery in the Sedibeng district municipality of South Africa. The municipality consists of three local municipalities, Lesedi, Emfuleni and Midvaal.

Design/methodology/approach

The sampling procedure was carefully designed, taking into account the spatial distribution of the population in the Sedibeng district municipality and the three local municipalities. A structured sample of 1,000 respondents was used for the study and descriptive and inferential statistics approaches were used. The focus was on citizen satisfaction with public service delivery in health care, housing, water, electricity, solid waste removal, community services or overall physical appearance of the community, cutting crimes and job creation.

Findings

Respondents are most dissatisfied with roads maintenance, government efforts to create jobs and reduce crime. Respondents from Emfuleni local municipality hold more positive feelings about public service delivery in the area of water, electricity, and solid waste. Their most negative feeling is in the area of job creation, roads and the municipality's efforts in cutting down on crime. On balance, respondents from Lesedi hold positive feelings about public service delivery only in the area of water and electricity supplies. Similarly, their most negative feelings are in the area of job creation, roads, and the municipality's efforts in cutting crime. Respondents from Midvaal do not hold positive feelings about public service delivery in their local municipality. Similar to other two local municipalities, their most negative feelings are in the area of job creation, roads, and the municipality's efforts in cutting crime. Overall, the most negative sentiment about public service delivery has been expressed by respondents from Midvaal, followed by Emfuleni and Lesedi.

Practical implications

It is important for public service delivery in Sedibeng municipality to improve so that citizens' public confidence can rise.

Originality/value

Throughout Africa, governments have been entrusted to finance and provide basic services such as health, education, telecommunications, safe water and modern sanitation. Adequate access to these services enhances development. Public services are a key determinant of quality of life that is not measured in per capita income. They are also an important element of any poverty reduction strategy. Thus, improving public service delivery is one of the biggest challenges in the continent.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Ben Freyens

In the wake of public service liberalisation in many OECD countries, economic interventions into the purpose and implementation of social policies have gained a lot of…

2494

Abstract

Purpose

In the wake of public service liberalisation in many OECD countries, economic interventions into the purpose and implementation of social policies have gained a lot of interest in recent years. The prime aim of this paper is to describe the nature of these interventions. The paper examines the reasons for pursuing elusive efficiency objectives in the conduct of public policy, rationales for purchaser‐provider splits, evaluation of cost‐quality relationships, service costing and pricing, and the influence of “external” economic variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper breaks the analysis of public policy down to three layers of economic interventions: macroeconomics (allocative efficiency, intervention rationales and macroeconomic environment), mesoeconomics (economics of delivery in “social industries”) and microeconomics (agent behaviour, contracting, pricing and evaluation). Each level of economic intervention is illustrated with examples, mainly taken from Australian public policy and mainstream social economic research.

Findings

Some of the most critical questions in policy implementation (outsourcing, pricing, contracting and agency problems) can be traced back to economic reforms. Experiments with new modes of service delivery are driven by a changing economic context, yet the efficiency gains from these innovative approaches may come at the expense of service quality.

Practical implications

Changing macro‐, meso‐ and microeconomic variables profoundly alter the parameters of service delivery. Designers and managers of service delivery systems need to be aware of – and skilled in – the practical application of economic principles, concepts and methods.

Originality/value

Except for the health sector, there is a lack of consistent research on the interrelationships between the standard economics toolkit and the delivery of public services. Yet the two are profoundly intertwined. The paper helps distinguish these relationships by putting together elements of conceptual analysis and fieldwork.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Henrik Johansson and Maria Björklund

Urban consolidation centres (UCCs) are often conceived to improve services in retail stores and potentially reduce costs. However, few studies have examined how retail…

1223

Abstract

Purpose

Urban consolidation centres (UCCs) are often conceived to improve services in retail stores and potentially reduce costs. However, few studies have examined how retail stores perceive the services a UCC could provide. The purpose of this paper is to explore retail stores’ potential demands for different services that a UCC could provide in order to foster the development and implementation of UCC solutions aimed towards more economically feasible business models.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured interviews were conducted with employees at 72 retail stores. Qualitative, as well as quantitative analyses, were conducted to identify the potential demands of the retail stores.

Findings

The authors have provided arguments why retail stores might be interested in UCC services, and thereby potentially pay for them. Improved customer service to stores’ customers might not be a valid argument. The authors point to the cost aspect: stores expend resources that a UCC could provide in a more cost-efficient manner.

Research limitations/implications

The findings contradict previous studies to some extent, as it indicates that a UCC may actually not enhance customer service in retail stores. Instead, the findings point to the importance of considering the potential advantages according to economies of scale that are facilitated by UCC services.

Practical implications

Taking the perspective of the stores is important in order to identify arguments for why they should pay for the services provided by a UCC.

Social implications

Financially viable UCC solutions are needed in order for the initiatives to be maintained and thereby provide a long-term decrease in the environmental and social footprints caused by urban freight.

Originality/value

This study answers the call for research addressing retailers’ perspective in urban logistics, as it takes a demand-driven perspective of the development of UCC services. Furthermore, by highlighting services requested by retail stores, it can guide the financing of UCC initiatives, an aspect that has been lacking.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-616-8

Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2009

Sophie Witter

Objective – The first wave of experiences of exemptions policies suggested that poverty-based exemptions, using individual targeting, were not effective, for practical and…

Abstract

Objective – The first wave of experiences of exemptions policies suggested that poverty-based exemptions, using individual targeting, were not effective, for practical and political economic reasons. In response, many countries have changed their approach in recent years – while maintaining user fees as a necessary source of revenue for facilities, they have been switching to categorical targeting, offering exemptions based on high-priority services or population groups. This chapter aims to examine the impact and conditions for effectiveness of this recent health finance modality.

Methodology/approach – The chapter is based on a literature review and on data from two complex evaluations of national fee exemption policies for delivery care in West Africa (Ghana and Senegal). A conceptual framework for analysing the impact of exemption policies is developed and used. Although the analysis focuses on exemption for deliveries, the framework and findings are likely to be generalisable to other service- or population-based exemptions.

Findings – The chapter presents background information on the nature of delivery exemptions, the drivers for their use, their scale and common modalities in low-income countries. It then looks at evidence of their impact, on utilisation, quality of care and equity and investigates their cost-effectiveness. The final section presents lessons on implementation and implications for policy-makers, including the acceptability and sustainability of exemptions and how they compare to other possible mechanisms.

Implications for policy – The chapter concludes that funded service- or group-based exemptions offer a simple, potentially effective route to mitigating inequity and inefficiency in the health systems of low-income countries. However, there are a number of key constraints. One is the fungibility of resources at health facility level. The second is the difficulty of sustaining a separate funding stream over the medium to long term. The third is the arbitrary basis for selecting high-priority services for exemption. The chapter therefore concludes that this financing mode is unstable and is likely to be transitional.

Details

Innovations in Health System Finance in Developing and Transitional Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-664-5

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