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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb008581. When citing the article, please…

165

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb008581. When citing the article, please cite: David Corkindale, (1991), “Establishing Marketing Management in Wine Companies”, International Journal of Wine Marketing, Vol. 3 Iss: 1, pp. 4 - 7.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb001069. When citing the article, please…

240

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb001069. When citing the article, please cite: David Corkindale, Gordon Wills, (1975), “Setting Advertising Budgets”, Management Decision, Vol. 13 Iss: 3, pp. 124 - 141.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1975

David Corkindale and Gordon Wills

The manager responsible for making advertising budget decisions is assailed with a plethora of advice and aids from specialists. Of necessity, many of the methods advocated by…

Abstract

The manager responsible for making advertising budget decisions is assailed with a plethora of advice and aids from specialists. Of necessity, many of the methods advocated by such specialists are not universally applicable, so their use is qualified. Many actual circumstances a manager is faced with do not conform to textbook circumstances, and the skill required is that of appreciating significant differences, and modifying the “best course of action answer” accordingly. There are often several crucial imponderables associated with making an optimum or even appropriate advertising appropriation decision and, faced with this situation, the manager must be pragmatic.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1991

David Corkindale

At last it is being recognised that a proper approval to marketing management is needed in the wine industry. So far it would appear that only half‐hearted, “plug‐the‐gap” efforts…

Abstract

At last it is being recognised that a proper approval to marketing management is needed in the wine industry. So far it would appear that only half‐hearted, “plug‐the‐gap” efforts have been made in this direction with the result that there has been a dearth of qualified personnel. Some confusion over the definition of marketing in the wine industry still exists — it is not about sales and advertising, and changes in strategy should not be allowed to dilute management's appreciation of marketing as a mandatory function. In order to instil the correct approach to marketing in general and wine marketing in particular, emphasis should be placed on formal training procedures, recruitment, reallocation of managerial responsibilities, and the setting of objectives.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1978

David Corkindale

A case study is presented which shows how savings of some 16% in annual running costs were achieved for a large, internal transportation system. The method of analysis and…

Abstract

A case study is presented which shows how savings of some 16% in annual running costs were achieved for a large, internal transportation system. The method of analysis and implementation that were used are believed to be applicable to a wide variety of transportation systems. The original system consisted of the total area served being split into separately operating sub‐areas. There was little sharing of jobs and facilities between areas. The new system created larger operating areas so that greater sharing of facilities ensued. The estimation of the ideal operating area size has to balance increased unloaded travel time between jobs against greater potential utilisation of facilities. A simple mathematical model was derived to enable the necessary calculations to be undertaken. This also produced a measure of “service” for judging the performance of alternative systems.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

David R. Corkindale and Anthony J. Welsh

The purpose of the research reported here was to discover what marketing approaches small wineries employ and to what degree they could be attributed to their success. The article…

513

Abstract

The purpose of the research reported here was to discover what marketing approaches small wineries employ and to what degree they could be attributed to their success. The article describes how the particular issue of measuring ‘success’ and what constituted ‘marketing’ was tackled and reports on the use of this in the subsequent empirical work. Five exploratory hypotheses were derived relating to the way in which ‘success’ could be measured and the contributory factors leading to the use of marketing. For small businesses that are classified at one of three levels of success the article reports what marketing activities were conducted. Data was gathered by personal interview from small wineries in the three main wine producing states and five main regions within these. The study found that: small winery operators are able to very consistently rate themselves and each other on success. Broadly, there were three factors that were used by them to gauge success: (i) wine quality and respect for this by peers, (ii) lifestyle, and (iii) business performance. Wineries at a particular level of success tend to use similar marketing activities and these differ somewhat from level to level. Those at higher levels of success are able to more comprehensively define ‘marketing’ and their customers and engage in marketing activities in a more discriminating way.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1978

David Corkindale and John Newall

This monograph presents a thorough examination of the phenomena of “threshold” levels of advertising activity and the “wearout’ of advertisements and/or campaigns. These are seen…

1155

Abstract

This monograph presents a thorough examination of the phenomena of “threshold” levels of advertising activity and the “wearout’ of advertisements and/or campaigns. These are seen as corresponding to the management questions “How little can we spend/How infrequently can we advertise?” and “How much is too much/How infrequently is too little?” In the first section the relevant literature on, or related to, the two issues is reviewed. Section 2 describes a survey aimed at establishing current beliefs in the existence of the phenomena, the practices resulting from these beliefs, and the data which support them. Finally, Section 3 offers an overview on the managerial issues involved in decisions concerning threshold or wearout risks in advertising. It is suggested that wasted expenditure may be occurring in advertising because the believed levels of threshold and wearout are both too high.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1976

David Corkindale

Investigates the use of advertising in marketing and its effectiveness. Suggests the establishment of objectives by setting a market share goal, determining the percentage of the…

2760

Abstract

Investigates the use of advertising in marketing and its effectiveness. Suggests the establishment of objectives by setting a market share goal, determining the percentage of the market to be reached and agreeing the necessary budget. Looks into the difficulties of implementing this practice. Presents a list of advantages, main considerations and general areas of objectives and evaluations for this practice. Concludes that the advertising objective can be evaluated for its degree of achievement.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

David Corkindale

This guide is in the form of concise statements on the various issues that should be considered by advertising management before decisions are made concerning the measurement of…

1692

Abstract

This guide is in the form of concise statements on the various issues that should be considered by advertising management before decisions are made concerning the measurement of advertising performance. These statements encapsulate current knowledge, practice and ideas. It aims to provide a clear guide to the use of available methods of measurement; it puts into context many of the arguments for and against particular methods, by demonstrating their relevance to advertising management.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

David Corkindale and Marcus Belder

This paper aims to investigate how the strength of a corporate brand influences the adoption of an innovative service, and the main components of the construct: corporate brand…

4594

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how the strength of a corporate brand influences the adoption of an innovative service, and the main components of the construct: corporate brand (CB).

Design/methodology/approach

A real‐world, online, information acceleration experiment was conducted where the marketing mix and competitive environment was held constant for a new service from three different CBs. Respondents indicated their likelihood of buying from each of these and their perceptions of them.

Findings

The study finds that there was a significant relationship between CB strength and respondents' likelihood of adoption of the service. The CB construct was found to comprise two factors: conative and cognitive, where the former was more influential on adoption probability.

Research limitations/implications

A limited set of variables commonly associated with brands was taken to be representative of CB. Further research would be needed to more generalise the findings and more fully examine the CB construct for its components.

Practical implications

A competent marketing mix is not sufficient on its own to gain the adoption of an innovative service: a strong CB is influential. The emotive rather than factual associations with the CB may well be a more influential on adoption decisions.

Originality/value

An indication of the scale of the CB effect on innovation adoption is given. CB is indicated to have two components: emotive and factual. Those managing the potential launch of an innovative service and who may have several corporate brands to choose from to use would be aided by this research.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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