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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2010

Darryl G. Greer and Michael W. Klein

The purpose of this paper is to suggest public service corporations as a new means of helping to finance comprehensive public colleges and universities based on a well‐documented

1842

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest public service corporations as a new means of helping to finance comprehensive public colleges and universities based on a well‐documented assumption that the current shared responsibility for financing public colleges is broken.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on financing comprehensive public colleges and universities, and explicitly does not focus on research, community, or proprietary institutions. The paper draws heavily from national data and literature on college finance and productivity, and uses New Jersey's state colleges and universities as primary examples.

Findings

The paper asserts that a new funding rationale for public colleges is imperative or these institutions will fail the principal mission of broad access for middle‐income students. Citing examples from New Jersey and other states, and drawing on work of other policy analysts, the paper proposes creation of new public service corporations not only as a means of generating new revenue to replace diminished state investment, but also as a means of enhancing transparency, accountability and public trust. The paper discusses explicit purposes and measurable benefits of the public service corporation.

Originality/value

The paper is written by two higher education policy practitioners with a combined 40 years executive experience in higher education law and policy at the state and national levels. They have been a leading voice for policy innovation in New Jersey. The paper has significant value for college presidents, trustees, governors, legislators, and policy analysts.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Greer Johnson, Stephen Billett, Darryl Dymock and Gregory Martin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological demonstration of how written and visual language in narrative and small stories about older workers might be read in…

1276

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological demonstration of how written and visual language in narrative and small stories about older workers might be read in multiple ways as supporting and/or constraining recent policy reform.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical theory and critical discourse analysis, supported by narrative analysis and visual analysis, offer a robust methodology to problematize the manner in which textually mediated discourses impact social policy reform for recruiting, retraining and retaining older workers.

Findings

The results show that still in such an “age positive” social policy environment, negative stereotypes about older workers persist, threatening to constrain social change.

Research limitations/implications

An exemplary analysis of two texts, representative of those related to Australian government initiatives to reform access to work for older citizens, provides an accessible means of (re)evaluating if and how such policies are more inclusive of older workers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an emerging trend in organization studies using a critical discourse analytic approach not only to written texts, but also to the less familiar visual narratives and stories.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Robert A. Scott

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on undergraduate student education, consider how campuses can address student needs as reported by the Lumina Foundation project, and…

193

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on undergraduate student education, consider how campuses can address student needs as reported by the Lumina Foundation project, and provide suggestions to campus leaders for ways in which they can place higher priority on meeting student needs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes the form of a reflective essay.

Findings

The campus president should be the chief education officer as well as the chief executive officer.

Research limitations/implications

While this essay is based on a single president’s experiences, it provides new dimensions for assessing leadership.

Practical implications

This essay provides a way of setting criteria for presidential searches and for assessing presidential performance.

Social implications

This essay provides examples of how a president can add value to the campus setting and local community.

Originality/value

This is an original approach and an original piece of work that draws on my experience and talks on campus.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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