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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1989

D.A. Booth

Health‐responsible food marketing in the deepest and technicallymost challenging sense is more than legitimate marketing (complying withthe food regulations), marketing under a

Abstract

Health‐responsible food marketing in the deepest and technically most challenging sense is more than legitimate marketing (complying with the food regulations), marketing under a company policy of nutritional composition, or even health‐image marketing (seeking to meet the health concerns of some food consumers). Fully health‐responsible food marketing is taking existing commercial options or opening up new ones for the design and presentation of appealing food and beverage products which support those habitual patterns of behaviour that on current evidence are likely to promote physical health while satisfying consumers′ other desires. The concept is illustrated by the need for technological and marketing developments that would help to prevent obesity. These would, for example, on long‐standing theory and recent field evidence, support the zero‐calorie drink break and its complete differentiation from the quick and convenient light meal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 91 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1991

D.A. Booth

Consumer motivation is often quite idiosyncraticin its structure, not just in its position within aresponse space common to all customers. Thesensitivity to sensory and conceptual…

Abstract

Consumer motivation is often quite idiosyncratic in its structure, not just in its position within a response space common to all customers. The sensitivity to sensory and conceptual influences of an individual′s brand choices can be used to measure the strengths and interactions of those influences on that person′s choice in the type of situation tested. Aggregation of the resulting personal response spaces provides greater operationalisation and definition of marketing opportunities than other modelling methods. Examples are given for drinks sweetened with sugar or low‐calorie sweetener.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

Stephen J. French, Nicholas W. Read, David A. Booth and Susan Arkley

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/orthe desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses tocomplex patterns of stimulation from…

Abstract

Eating and drinking temporarily suppress the desire to eat and/or the desire to drink. These satiating effects are learned responses to complex patterns of stimulation from available foods and drinks and the external and internal environments. Considers the possible roles of physiological actions of ingested foods and beverages in the signals from the body which contribute to the sense of repletion, the dulling of hunger and the quenching of thirst.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1993

R.P.J. Freeman, N.J. Richardson, M.S. Kendal‐Reed and D.A. Booth

Cognitive technology provides a response‐sensitivity metric forinteractions between major influences on a response by an individualconsumer. There is no restriction on the types…

Abstract

Cognitive technology provides a response‐sensitivity metric for interactions between major influences on a response by an individual consumer. There is no restriction on the types of influence or response which can be measured, so long as at least two normal levels (or the presence and absence) of the influence can be tested independently of variations in other influences. Illustrates this novel methodology for open‐ended concept tests, free‐choice profiling of physical products, interactions among tastes, aromas and textures, and the integration of a sensory characteristic with a conceptual attribute.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Anne Laajalahti

Recently, ethical leadership has become a widely studied research topic. Simultaneously, many studies have begun to emphasise the role of interpersonal communication competence…

Abstract

Recently, ethical leadership has become a widely studied research topic. Simultaneously, many studies have begun to emphasise the role of interpersonal communication competence (ICC) in successful leadership. However, there has been little discussion on the links between ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC. To address this research gap, this study aims to compare and combine the research traditions of ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC. The study is based on two literature reviews examining (a) ethical leadership (substudy 1; N = 27) and (b) leaders’ ICC (substudy 2; N = 18). The research questions are as follows: (a) How are the requirements of leaders’ ICC noticed in the literature of ethical leadership? (substudy 1) (b) How are the requirements of ethical leadership noticed in the literature of leaders’ ICC? (substudy 2) The findings reveal that (a) studies in ethical leadership rarely pay attention to leaders’ ICC and (b) studies in leaders’ ICC do not often discuss ethical aspects of ICC, at least explicitly. While a larger sample would have been preferred, the study contributes to previous research by addressing a research gap between ethical leadership and leaders’ ICC and suggests integrating these research traditions to better understand the nature of ethics and ICC in leadership. By promoting novel interdisciplinary research perspectives, the study provides a foundation for further research and development of (a) a competence-based approach to ethical leadership and (b) an ethics-focused approach to competent leadership communication.

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1957

ANDREW D. BOOTH

The present paper is intended to form an introduction to the ideas of machine translation; it is in no sense a complete account of the work which has been carried out at Birkbeck…

Abstract

The present paper is intended to form an introduction to the ideas of machine translation; it is in no sense a complete account of the work which has been carried out at Birkbeck College and elsewhere and which interested readers can study in more detail in a book which is in course of publication.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Wiriya Chongruksut and Albie Brooks

While a number of studies relating to activity‐based costing (ABC) have been conducted, relatively few have been conducted in the South East Asia region. This paper reports the…

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Abstract

While a number of studies relating to activity‐based costing (ABC) have been conducted, relatively few have been conducted in the South East Asia region. This paper reports the results of a survey of firms in Thailand regarding issues associated with ABC adoption and implementation. The study finds that the rate of ABC adoption in Thailand was relatively high (58% of all respondent firms having ABC knowledge and adopting ABC as an idea; 35% of respondents overall) compared with other Asian countries. In particular, firms with greater variation in product complexity, complexity of production service processes and intensity of capital equipment were more likely to adopt ABC. In line with previous studies, top management support was identified as a key criterion influencing the success of ABC.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Nigel Ford, Dave Miller, Alan O’rourke, Jane Ralph, Edward Turnock and Andrew Booth

The emergence of evidence‐based medicine has implications for the use and development of information retrieval systems which are not restricted to the area of medicine…

963

Abstract

The emergence of evidence‐based medicine has implications for the use and development of information retrieval systems which are not restricted to the area of medicine. ‘Evidence‐based’ practice emphasises the retrieval and application of high quality knowledge in order to solve real‐world problems. However, information seeking to support such evidence‐based approaches to decision making and problem solving makes demands on retrieval systems which they are not well suited at present to satisfy. A number of approaches have been developed in the field of medicine that seek to address these limitations. The extent to which such approaches may be applied to other areas is discussed, as are their limitations.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

David A. Booth and Richard P.J. Freeman

This research study aims to illustrate the mapping of each consumer’s mental processes in a market-relevant context. This paper shows how such maps deliver operational insights…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research study aims to illustrate the mapping of each consumer’s mental processes in a market-relevant context. This paper shows how such maps deliver operational insights that cannot be gained by physical methods such as brain imaging.

Design/methodology/approach

A marketed conceptual attribute and a sensed material characteristic of a popular product were varied across presentations in a common use. The relative acceptability of each proposition was rated together with analytical descriptors. The mental interaction that determined each consumer’s preferences was calculated from the individual’s performance at discriminating each viewed sample from a personal norm. These personal cognitive characteristics were aggregated into maps of demand in the market for subpanels who bought these for the senses or for the attribute.

Findings

Each of 18 hypothesized mental processes dominated acceptance in at least a few individuals among both sensory and conceptual purchasers. Consumers using their own descriptive vocabulary processed the factors in appeal of the product more centrally. The sensory and conceptual factors tested were most often processed separately, but a minority of consumers treated them as identical. The personal ideal points used in the integration of information showed that consumers wished for extremes of the marketed concept that are technologically challenging or even impossible. None of this evidence could be obtained from brain imaging, casting in question its usefulness in marketing.

Research limitations/implications

Panel mapping of multiple discriminations from a personal norm fills three major gaps in consumer marketing research. First, preference scores are related to major influences on choices and their cognitive interactions in the mind. Second, the calculations are completed on the individual’s data and the cognitive parameters of each consumer’s behavior are aggregated – never the raw scores. Third, discrimination scaling puts marketed symbolic attributes and sensed material characteristics on the same footing, hence measuring their causal interactions for the first time.

Practical implications

Neuromarketing is an unworkable proposition because brain imaging does not distinguish qualitative differences in behavior. Preference tests are operationally effective when designed and analyzed to relate behavioral scores to major influences from market concepts and sensory qualities in interaction. The particular interactions measured in the reported study relate to the major market for healthy eating.

Originality/value

This is the first study to measure mental interactions among determinants of preference, as well as including both a marketed concept and a sensed characteristic. Such an approach could be of great value to consumer marketing, both defensively and creatively.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 September 2016

Teresa M. Cooney, Christine M. Proulx and Linley A. Snyder-Rivas

This study assessed the marital quality of older men and women in first marriages and remarriages, examining gender differences within first marriages and remarriages, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study assessed the marital quality of older men and women in first marriages and remarriages, examining gender differences within first marriages and remarriages, and marriage order differences for men and women separately.

Methodology

The study employed nationally representative survey data for 1,243 married adults, aged 62–91, from Wave II of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP), conducted in 2010–2011. Marital quality was assessed with six positive relationship dimensions and two negative ones.

Findings

Descriptive data revealed mean ratings above scale midpoints on all positive dimensions of marital quality, and mean ratings generally below the midpoints on the negative dimensions for men and women in both first marriages and remarriages. Multivariate analyses indicated an overall stronger influence of gender than marriage order on marital quality for this sample of older adults. In both first marriages and remarriages, men reported more favorable perceptions of marriage across several positive dimensions (e.g., emotional satisfaction, physical pleasure), though they also reported more spousal criticism than did women. Within gender groups, marriage order was not associated with any of the dimensions of marital quality that were assessed.

Value

This study demonstrates that marriage order does not have a significant influence on the marital quality of older adults today, but that long-standing gender differences in marital quality hold across marriage order. These findings are critical given the increasingly diverse marital histories of individuals entering old age in the early 21st century, and the importance of a positive, supportive marriage for older adults’ well-being.

Details

Divorce, Separation, and Remarriage: The Transformation of Family
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-229-3

Keywords

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