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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Miguel Moital, Julie Whitfield, Caroline Jackson and Arjun Bahl

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine event sponsorship decision making by the Indian drinks industry, comparing the non‐alcoholic and alcoholic drinks sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Data regarding event sponsorship activity, perceptions of event sponsorship, motives to sponsor, form of investment and structure of sponsorship was obtained from a sample of 61 drinks producers in India through a questionnaire. Mann‐Whitney and logistic regression were employed to compare the alcoholic and the non‐alcoholic sectors.

Findings

The results suggest that the alcohol and non‐alcohol drinks sectors sponsored a similar level of events, but in investment volume terms, sponsorship from the non‐alcoholic sector is far greater than that of the alcoholic sector. While the two sectors are similar in many ways, the emphasis placed on certain motives for sponsoring events was different, with alcoholic drinks businesses placing greater importance on reaching niche audiences and increasing media coverage than non‐alcoholic ones.

Research limitations/implications

A limited number of areas of the sponsorship decision‐making were covered, yet the study provides insights into the decision making of one of the key sponsoring industries: the drinks industry.

Practical implications

Securing sponsorship is becoming more difficult and complex. By understanding how sponsors make decisions, including potential variations between companies within an industry, event organisers will be in a better position to tailor sponsorship proposals, enhancing the likelihood of obtaining the desired sponsorship contracts.

Originality/value

Most sponsor decision‐making research focuses on how sponsorship decisions can be improved so that they work better for the sponsor. This paper, in contrast, emphasises that by understanding how clients make decisions (i.e. sponsors), sellers (i.e. the sponsored) will be in a better position to win over competition and secure the desired sponsorship deals.

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International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Paul Davie

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major…

Abstract

The development of marketing thinking has been stimulated by the pressures of competition. If growing competition for more mature and discriminating markets is a major trend for the next decade, the pursuit of improved product quality and of excellence will be an essential management response. New product development is a vital part of marketing policy for all companies and organisations, as it represents one of the key means by which corporate renewal is achieved and a future secured. This article analyses new product development in the light of the new alcohol soft drink products, which presents a myriad of challenges and opportunities for beverage manufactures and the UK drinks market These drinks have been latched onto by brewers who were desperate to win over young people who had snubbed beer and cider; but their drive has backfired, with drinks such as Hoopers Hooch being condemned for their appeal towards the teenager. In view of this, the article will conclude by identifying the controversial implications these drinks will have for the future stability of the alcoholic soft drink market

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2020

Martina Topić, Gemma Bridge and Ralph Tench

The purpose of this paper is to explore changes in corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies in food, soft drinks and packaging industries to capture changes in CSR…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore changes in corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies in food, soft drinks and packaging industries to capture changes in CSR implementation given increased environmental activism. The paper takes an exploratory approach in reviewing CSR policy changes to explore to what extent companies change CSR policies with increased environmentalism.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative website analysis was used to analyse CSR policies of companies in the food, soft drinks and packaging industries in the UK. The companies were selected for the analysis based on their annual turnover and 23 companies were analysed (seven for the soft drinks industry, eight for the food industry and eight for packaging industry). Five interviews were conducted with packaging and retail professionals, and the findings were analysed by using thematic analysis, which captured trends in responses.

Findings

The findings show that companies are implementing and communicating CSR policies heavily focussed on reducing the environmental impact of their work and matching social debates on human rights, with which traditional CSR policies (corporate governance, supporting local communities and consultation with stakeholders) are fading away. Instead, companies have shifted attention towards the gender pay gap, modern slavery and extensive environmentalism. The interviews with packaging professionals and CSR managers from the retail industry show that the packaging industry designs CSR policies in line with requests from supermarkets, which are, in turn, influenced by consumer activism.

Practical implications

This paper shows the circular relationship between media coverage, consumer activism, which comes as a result, and the impact and changes this brings to the industry. To avoid reputation damage, companies should closely follow media debates to pre-empty consumer criticism and activism.

Social implications

The findings show that companies are “mirroring the zeitgast” and going with trends to meet consumer expectations, which brings into question the sincerity of CSR policies and revives the criticism of capitalism and raises a question whether CSR is used by companies as a smokescreen that on the outset makes a difference to the society but keeps status quo intact.

Originality/value

The paper provides an insight into CSR implementation of three industries that faced heavy criticism from campaigners and the general public for their environmental impact. The paper shows how the CSR policy shifted to match this expectation and thus provides a good ground for studying the evolution of CSR using a case study from three selected industries.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1993

Klaus Diederichs

Consider the question posed in the title from the viewpoint of aninvestment banker based with J.P. Morgan, who has advised clients in thefood and drinks industry over…

Abstract

Consider the question posed in the title from the viewpoint of an investment banker based with J.P. Morgan, who has advised clients in the food and drinks industry over various transactions. Reviews past activity in mergers and acquisitions as a need for consolidation to gain market advantage and economics of scale; and access into the wider European market. Advises that further restructuring and consolidation is necessary and inevitable in an industry which is still fragmented; and that acquiring products and brands which are market leaders is still a better option than trying to create new ones. Considers in depth the influencing factors and the opportunities to possess focused product portfolios, category leadership and pan‐European markets. Draws on examples of major companies which have practical sound acquisition strategies, fast de‐leveraging after acquisition and created long‐term shareholder value.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 95 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2010

John C. Gardner and Carl B. McGowan

The objective of this paper is to analyze the five largest companies in the soft drink industry in the context of the regional triad theory as presented in Rugman and…

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to analyze the five largest companies in the soft drink industry in the context of the regional triad theory as presented in Rugman and Brain (2003) and later in Rugman and Verbeke (2004b, 2007). We find that of the five largest companies in the soft drink industry, only Coca‐Cola meets the definition of a global company as defined by regional triad theory. National Beverage is a strictly domestic company and Cadbury, Cott, and Pepsi are bi‐regional MNEs with sales in the NAFTA and European triad regions. Coca‐Cola reports sales in five major geographic regions, which fits the criteria of a global firm

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1976

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems…

Abstract

The way of thought and vision and memory is that they often come upon you unexpectedly, presenting nothing new but usually with a clarity and emphasis that it all seems new. This will sometimes happen after a long period of indecision or when things are extremely difficult, as they have long been for the country, in most homes and among ordinary individuals. Watching one's life savings dwindle away, the nest‐egg laid down for security in an uncertain world, is a frightening process. This has happened to the nation, once the richest in the world, and ot its elderly people, most of them taught the habit of saving in early youth. We are also taught that what has been is past changing; the clock cannot be put back, and the largesse—much of it going to unprincipled spongers—distributed by a spendthrift Government as token relief is no answer, not even to present difficulties. The response can only come by a change of heart in those whose brutal selfishness have caused it all; and this may be a long time in coming. In the meantime, it is a useful exercise to consider our assets, to recognize those which must be protected at all costs and upon which, when sanity returns, the future depends.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 78 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Sue Peattie

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However…

Abstract

Over the last thirty years, wine has taken an increasingly large share of the UK alcoholic drinks market with sales volume growing at a rate of 4.2% per annum. However, although the market has expanded there is now increasing competitiveness within this market from the new wine producing areas. More recently, competition is emerging from new drinks such as speciality beers and alcoholic soft drinks. The implications for the wine marketer is that there is a need to make full use of all the ‘tools’ within the marketing management toolkit. One of the most popular responses for marketers under competitive pressure in a range of industries is sales promotion. But despite being popular, sales promotion is poorly understood compared to advertising. This is partly because it has never enjoyed the academic scrutiny afforded to the more glamorous field of advertising. However, promotional techniques are now being studied individually and their appropriateness for different markets and marketing tasks is being discussed. Price‐based promotions have been the most popular in the drinks market, as in many other markets, but there is growing awareness that non‐price based promotions can add value for the consumer while meeting a range of marketing communications objectives. This article looks at the use of consumer competitions, one of the most popular non‐price promotional tools, with a survey of 319 competitions run by the drinks industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Rita Marcella, Sylvie Davies and Dorothy Williams

Analysis of results from exploratory research into the attitudes of exporters of the food and drink industry of north‐east Scotland towards the value of foreign language…

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1276

Abstract

Analysis of results from exploratory research into the attitudes of exporters of the food and drink industry of north‐east Scotland towards the value of foreign language skills suggests a certain degree of ambivalence, which, together with the lack of resources and available skills can explain the absence of systematic language strategies. It also demonstrates the case for a questionnaire survey focusing on the various aspects of international marketing communication in the context of that particular industry sector across Scotland. Findings provided information on a range of practices and attitudes as well as a better knowledge of the nature of communication barriers; the means and tools of international marketing communication; the context of use of foreign languages; criteria for export success, perception of the impact of the customer’s language use on marketing success; significance of skills for international marketing success; perception of impact of educational policies on opportunities in the global market.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Peter Jones, David Hillier and Daphne Comfort

The purpose of this paper is to provide an exploratory general review of both the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agendas being publicly reported by the world's

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2906

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an exploratory general review of both the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agendas being publicly reported by the world's leading spirits and beer producers and the nature of their reporting CSR processes, and then to offer some wider reflections on the ways these producers are addressing and pursuing CSR strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins with a short discussion of the characteristics of CSR, then draws its empirical material from the most recent CSR reports posted on the websites of the world's top five spirits and top five beer producers.

Findings

The findings reveal that the leading spirits and beer producers are moving towards integrating CSR into their core business, and while they particularly emphasise their commitment to foster responsible drinking, they also address a wide range of impacts within the marketplace, the communities in which they operate, the environment and the workplace. Although the leading producers generally adopt a very positive approach in their CSR reports, independent external assessment of the reporting process is very limited. More generally, the paper offers some critical reflections on the CSR agendas currently being pursued by the leading spirits and beer producers.

Originality/value

The paper provides an accessible review of, and some reflections on, the CSR agendas being pursued by some of the world's leading spirits and beer producers, and as such it will interest academics in business and management and hospitality departments, a range of people working in management positions within the drinks industry, and those professionals who work with the industry.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Jana Šimáková, Daniel Stavárek, Tomáš Pražák and Marie Ligocká

The purpose of this paper is to estimate and evaluate the impact of macroeconomic fundamentals on stock prices of selected food and drink industry stocks during the period…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate and evaluate the impact of macroeconomic fundamentals on stock prices of selected food and drink industry stocks during the period of 2005–2015, which saw the global financial crisis and its aftermath.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed correlation analysis and the Johansen cointegration test with the vector error correction mechanism for EU companies operating in the food and drink industry. The paper tested the effects of GDP, inflation and interest rates (IR) on the stock prices of companies from Austria, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Spain and the UK.

Findings

Based on the results, the authors can see that GDP has a generally positive effect on stock price development. In contrast, the relationship between stock prices and inflation and IR is negative in most cases.

Originality/value

Despite the fact that a majority of empirical research on companies in the food and drink sector was performed using the microeconomic approach, this paper used the macroeconomic approach and clearly demonstrated the effects of selected macro-variables on stock prices in selected EU markets. Macroeconomic factors shape the company’s performance and could potentially lead to persistent changes in supply and demand conditions in food and drink markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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