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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

This chapter presents five differentiated models of curriculum, each designed with templates created from learning theories. The discipline of distributed leadership is…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

This chapter presents five differentiated models of curriculum, each designed with templates created from learning theories. The discipline of distributed leadership is chosen to develop a cognition-based curriculum, a behavior-based curriculum, a performance-based curriculum, a values-based curriculum, and collectively arranged into a competency-based curriculum. The research literature frames the attributes of a competency-based curriculum on psychological competence.

In this chapter, curricula are developed to demonstrate the process of adapting theories of learning, instruction, and environment into design templates with which to differentiate the dimensions and components of a curriculum. In these curricula, multiple conceptual frameworks are employed to translate the content and structure of the discipline into instructional objectives, instructional engagement, instructional experience, and instructional environment to align the instructional processes with the intended learning. For these demonstrations, the discipline of organizational leadership is chosen due to the multidimensional structure of this discipline and the opportunities it presents to differentiate the curriculum and learning. Each component of the curriculum adapts an appropriate framework to align and interconnect the instructional processes into an optimized learning experience. The result is curricula that have a coherent flow horizontally across the components for each outcome as well as interconnectedness vertically between the outcomes. This approach creates coherence, alignment, and interconnectedness to the curricula and order to the learning process for the learners.

This methodology is applied to design the curriculum for five instructional modules. Module 1 focuses on dualistic thinking developed through a cognition-based curriculum. Module 2 presents a multiplistic learning experience through a behavior-based curriculum. Module 3 presents relativistic learning through a performance-based curriculum. Module 4 delivers complex learning through a values-based curriculum. Module 5 compiles these four modules into a competency-based curriculum model.

Each of these modules employs a unique set of theories to configure the components of the curricula to reflect the structure of each discipline. The use of each theory is explained and demonstrated in the design process.

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Li Wang

The purpose of this paper is to present a model for curricular integration of information literacy for undergraduate programs in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a model for curricular integration of information literacy for undergraduate programs in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are drawn from individual interviews at three universities in Australia and curricular integration working experience at a New Zealand university. Sociocultural theories are adopted in the research process and in the development of the model.

Findings

Key characteristics of the curriculum integration of information literacy were identified and an information literacy integration model was developed. The S2J2 key behaviours for campus‐wide multiple‐partner collaboration in information literacy integration were also identified.

Research limitations/implications

The model was developed without including the employer needs. Through the process of further research, the point of view of the employer on how to provide information literacy education needs to be explored in order to strengthen the model in curricular design.

Practical implications

The information literacy integration model was developed based on practical experience in higher education and has been applied in different undergraduate curricular programs. The model could be used or adapted by both librarians and academics when they integrate information literacy into an undergraduate curriculum from a lower level to a higher level.

Originality/value

The information literacy integration model was developed based on recent PhD research. The model integrates curriculum, pedagogy and learning theories, information literacy theories, information literacy guidelines, people and collaboration together. The model provides a framework of how information literacy can be integrated into multiple courses across an undergraduate academic degree in higher education.

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2019

John N. Moye

In this chapter, each of the completed models of curriculum is presented and evaluated using criteria from the attributes of effective curricula discussed in Chapter 1…

Abstract

Chapter Summary

In this chapter, each of the completed models of curriculum is presented and evaluated using criteria from the attributes of effective curricula discussed in Chapter 1. Explanations of the design strategies that are used to demonstrate each attribute in a differentiated manner are included. The evaluation process provides an evaluation methodology to demonstrate the effectiveness of each model of a curriculum in a credible and trustworthy way.

In the previous chapters, the individual parts of the curricula were configured, aligned, and interconnected to deliver specific outcomes in each learning module. In this chapter, the components of each curriculum are assembled into one table to exhibit the order contained within each learning module within the overall curriculum. The standards for curricular attributes adopted at the beginning of the design process are the criteria for the evaluation of the completed curriculum. The strategies used to configure the components of each curriculum provide evidence of the curriculum’s characteristics, which demonstrate compliance with each criterion.

The evaluation of these attributes within a curriculum serves several purposes. First, they provide a checklist to guide the design process toward curricula that reflect these standards as developed by the profession of curriculum design in higher education. Second, they provide a measurement of the attributes of the curriculum to demonstrate the compliance of each curricular design with conventional standards. Third, these measurements can be compared with other institutional data to uncover correlations between the design assumptions and learner performance. These correlations often reveal unanticipated results, which inform the effectiveness of the instructional system.

These criteria are applied to the evaluation of the curriculum for each module to demonstrate the diverse manner in which each can be achieved in a discipline-specific manner. The compliance with these criteria is explained to be a matter of demonstration, as used in the discipline of qualitative research. These qualitative evaluations can then be compared with other operational data to understand the effectiveness of the design assumptions for each curriculum.

Details

Learning Differentiated Curriculum Design in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-117-4

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Eman S. ElKaleh

This chapter provides a critical and comprehensive review of internationalisation models and strategies in higher education and offers a conceptual model for…

Abstract

This chapter provides a critical and comprehensive review of internationalisation models and strategies in higher education and offers a conceptual model for internationalising the curriculum, taking educational administration and leadership as an example of its implementation. The chapter starts with an introduction and overview of globalisation and how higher education institutions respond to its increasing effects by adopting different internationalisation strategies. This is followed by a discussion on the different forces and rationales involved and the various models and strategies adopted by higher education institutions as well as the many challenges and obstacles they encounter when implementing these strategies. The third section focuses on ways of internationising the curriculum and how it is a complex, dynamic and developmental process that requires the implementation of most internationalisation strategies. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the IHEC model which is created for internationalising the higher education curriculum, focusing on educational administration and leadership as an example. The IHEC model aims to provide students with a universal and holistic learning experience that prepares them for the increasingly competitive and diversified working environment. It also attempts to overcome the Westernisation indigenisation debate by adopting a holistic approach to knowledge and cultural practices that appreciates and integrates different perspectives, knowledge traditions and work practices into the curriculum.

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2010

Alison J. Cotgrave and Noora Kokkarinen

The aim of this paper is to describe the research and process used to develop a curriculum design guidance model that can be used to develop a sustainability literate…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to describe the research and process used to develop a curriculum design guidance model that can be used to develop a sustainability literate construction curriculum in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative study between the UK and Australia was undertaken. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in both countries and then analysed to determine what was needed to develop an appropriate model for curriculum design within construction education. Various areas regarding curriculum assessment were considered in order to provide an insightful and comprehensive model for curriculum design.

Findings

The results indicated that the UK and Australia do not differ significantly with regards to best practice in curriculum design.

Research limitations/implications

The subsequent model can be used by academics to integrate more opportunities for sustainable literacy into construction courses. The proposed model has the potential to be used interchangeably within both countries and possibly beyond.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the need for academia to assess the level of environmental knowledge that they disseminate to students as an integrated part of their overall degree rather than at a modular level.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Tamara Savelyeva and James R. McKenna

The purpose of this paper is to build a detailed description of the Global Seminar (GS) curricula model by exploring its on‐the‐ground participatory practices in America…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build a detailed description of the Global Seminar (GS) curricula model by exploring its on‐the‐ground participatory practices in America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Within a qualitative research design framework, the authors interviewed 20 faculty members from the USA, Mexico, Costa Rica, Italy, Australia, Sweden, Honduras, South Africa, Germany, Austria, and Denmark. They observed 11 class sessions; and analyzed available course documents.

Findings

The GS model provides a broader notion of teaching and learning for sustainability that incorporates greening and education for sustainability into curricula. This participatory model proves the emerging shift towards a new paradigm of teaching and learning for sustainability in academia.

Originality/value

This paper shows how academia can address sustainability through curricula models that promote a fundamental change to the dominant academic paradigm and challenge the existing understanding of sustainability in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 July 2014

Elissa F. Brown and Tamra L. Stambaugh

Placing gifted and talented students together organizationally is not a substitute for appropriate services. The placement or program model fundamentally serves as a…

Abstract

Placing gifted and talented students together organizationally is not a substitute for appropriate services. The placement or program model fundamentally serves as a vehicle to group or organize students together but programming, in practice, sometimes referred to as a service delivery model, is not the same thing as service. Placement is a management strategy. It must be coupled with curriculum and instructional modifications in order for substantial and positive academic and social–emotional effects to occur for gifted and talented students. Specifically, the program placement model is only as good as the curriculum and instructional models provided within that placement. This chapter provides descriptions and research evidence of the macro program models used for serving gifted students and more commonly used program placement models for grouping gifted students together within the traditional school day and beyond. Non-negotiable components and future directions are also discussed within the context of placement.

Details

Gifted Education: Current Perspectives and Issues
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-741-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Shireen J. Fahey, John R. Labadie and Noel Meyers

The aim of this paper is to present the challenges external drivers and internal inertia faced by curriculum designers and implementers at institutions of higher…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to present the challenges external drivers and internal inertia faced by curriculum designers and implementers at institutions of higher education. The challenges to academics from competing factors are presented: internal resistance to changing existing curricula vs the necessity to continuously evolve programmes to reflect a dynamic, uncertain future. The necessity to prepare future leaders to face global issues such as climate change, dictates changing curricula to reflect changing personal, environmental and societal needs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses the case study method to examine two models of climate change curriculum design and renewal. One model, from an Australian university, is based upon national education standards and the second is a non-standards-based curriculum design, developed and delivered by a partnership of four North American universities.

Findings

The key findings from this study are that the highest level of participation by internal-to-the-programme academics and administrators is required. Programme quality, delivery and content alignment may be compromised with either stand-alone course delivery and learning outcomes, or if courses are developed independently of others in the programme. National educational standards can be effective tools to guide course and programme management, monitoring, review and updating.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for postgraduate level curricula design, implementation and programme evaluation.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to compare, contrast and critique a national standards-based, higher education curriculum and a non-standards-based curriculum.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Yin Cheong Cheng

Aims to develop an organizational model for understanding and managingeffective curriculum change in school. Assumes that curriculum changeand teacher competence…

Abstract

Aims to develop an organizational model for understanding and managing effective curriculum change in school. Assumes that curriculum change and teacher competence development occur in a three‐level context of school organization: the individual level, the group/ programme level, and the whole school level. There exists mutual development and reinforcement between curriculum and teacher competence and also a hierarchy of influence across three levels. Congruence between curriculum change and teacher development and across levels is important for effectiveness of teaching and learning. Congruence represents conceptual consistency and operational consistency, reflecting the strength of school culture. Provides a comprehensive conceptual framework to plan and manage curriculum change and teacher competence development.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

G. Stewart and M. Rosemann

This paper discusses the design of a problem‐based learning approach that seeks to embed industrial knowledge in the enterprise resource planning (ERP)‐related curriculum

Abstract

This paper discusses the design of a problem‐based learning approach that seeks to embed industrial knowledge in the enterprise resource planning (ERP)‐related curriculum of universities. It describes a project that is developing a business reference model for public administration. This reference model is to be implemented in the leading ERP system SAP R/3. Teaching cases are developed through collaboration between universities and industry. The paper argues that this approach is in alignment with the recommendations of key curriculum documents and educational approaches.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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