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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Sherah L. Basham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emergency preparedness and community policing within campus law enforcement agencies, as well as agency…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between emergency preparedness and community policing within campus law enforcement agencies, as well as agency and campus characteristics that impact the level of emergency preparedness activities.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data from the 2011–2012 Survey of Campus Law Enforcement Agencies, this study employs ordinary least squares regression modeling to examine emergency preparedness and community policing relationships within 298 campus law enforcement agencies.

Findings

Community policing is the greatest predictor of emergency preparedness in campus law enforcement agencies. This finding refutes arguments that emergency preparedness and community policing are incompatible policing innovations.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited by the use of secondary data. Future research should utilize survey measures to better isolate the roles and functions of community policing and emergency preparedness.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for campus law enforcement agencies to view emergency preparedness and community policing activities as interrelated. Specifically, agency administration can benefit by taking a holistic approach to campus policing and preparedness.

Originality/value

This paper extends the current research in municipal policing to the campus police environment. This paper also adds to the limited body of literature on the relationships between community policing and emergency preparedness.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2019

Jacinta M. Gau and Nicholas D. Paul

The purpose of this paper is to examine police officers’ attitudes toward community policing and order maintenance, as well as the facets of the work environment that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine police officers’ attitudes toward community policing and order maintenance, as well as the facets of the work environment that impact those attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data come from a sample of officers in a mid-sized police department. Ordinary least squares regression modeling is used to examine community-policing, order-maintenance and law-enforcement role orientations.

Findings

Officers endorse community partnerships, but are less enthusiastic about order maintenance. They also display mid-level support for traditional law enforcement. Work–environment variables have inconsistent impacts across the three role orientations.

Research limitations/implications

This was a survey of attitudes in one department. Future research should examine officers’ involvement in community-policing and order-maintenance activities and any impediments to such activities.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for police leaders seeking to implement community policing and ensure street-level officers are carrying out partnership and order-maintenance activities. In particular, top management must foster a positive work environment and personally model commitment to policing innovations.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the currently sparse body of literature on officer attitudes toward community policing and order maintenance, and incorporates traditional law-enforcement attitudes as a point of contrast. This paper advances the scholarly understanding of police officers’ role orientations.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Byongook Moon

The study aims to examine the effect of organizational socialization into police culture on officers' attitudes toward community policing in South Korea.

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the effect of organizational socialization into police culture on officers' attitudes toward community policing in South Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

The study sampled 694 Korean police officers. Policy implication and direction for future research is discussed.

Findings

The results indicate a positive relationship between the degree of organizational socialization and police officers' attitudes toward community policing, contrary to hypothesized directions. Police officers who report higher levels of socialization into police culture are more likely to support the philosophy of community policing and line officers' autonomy/participation, and to perceive a positive relationship with citizens. The findings may indicate that police culture in Korea is fundamentally different from those of other countries, even though the Korean police share some common characteristics of police culture (i.e. machismo, isolation, or conflict with citizens) with its counterparts.

Originality/value

The study provides useful information on the effect of organizational socialization into police culture on officers' attitudes toward community policing.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

T.K. Vinod Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that impact assessment of police performance across the two types of policing methods, and explains the differing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that impact assessment of police performance across the two types of policing methods, and explains the differing police public dynamics at the field level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the varying police public dynamics in areas with and without community policing. For this purpose data were obtained from a survey conducted in the City of Calicut where the Janamaitri community policing program was implemented in some of the police stations. To obtain a contrasting perspective in areas without community policing, survey was also conducted in areas where community policing was not conducted. The method adopted in this study is to map people's perception of police performance and factors impacting it across the two areas and compare the same. The comparison is done by examining the OLS regression in the two areas with same independent and dependent variables, and explaining similarities and contrasts in trends.

Findings

It concludes that while community policing has great advantages over conventional policing, it has the challenge of increasing expectation among the public and diminishing impact of certain factors that are relevant in conventional police service delivery mechanisms.

Originality/value

There is one of the first studies comparing and analyzing the differing police public dynamics in areas with community policing and areas with conventional policing. It provides an insight into how public perception of police is formed in these differing environments.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Allison T. Chappell

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which traditional field training incorporates community‐oriented policing and problem solving in its formal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the extent to which traditional field training incorporates community‐oriented policing and problem solving in its formal evaluation process. Can community policing be successfully integrated into the San Jose field training model as a formal component of training and evaluation of police recruits?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes formal field training evaluations and narratives in one police agency that uses the San Jose Field Training Officer Program. The agency endorses and practices community policing and problem solving.

Findings

Field training in this agency did not successfully integrate community policing and problem solving into the formal evaluation process.

Practical implications

Because field training occurs immediately after the academy, it is the best place to expose recruits to community policing and problem solving in practice, thus linking training with practice. If police agencies are truly committed to community policing, they must update their field training curricula to reflect the new philosophy and practice.

Originality/value

Though there has been considerable research in the area of community policing, little of it focuses on training, especially field training. Ironically, even though most agencies claim to practice community policing, they have failed to prepare their officers in the philosophies and skills necessary to perform the tasks well. Police academies are beginning to train recruits in community policing, but most agencies still use the San Jose FTO model, which was developed before contemporary community policing existed. Because field training is such an important part of police socialization, it must teach recruits the skills of community policing.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Willard M. Oliver and Elaine Bartgis

The theoretical framework for community policing attempts to answer many of the questions revolving around the new paradigm in policing. The paper traces the evolution of…

Abstract

The theoretical framework for community policing attempts to answer many of the questions revolving around the new paradigm in policing. The paper traces the evolution of community policing as a paradigm in the Kuhnian sense, then proceeds to articulate how it has moved from “revolutionary science” to “normal science”. It then articulates some of the current research in community policing theory and calls for the creation of a theoretical framework under which community policing can be analyzed and evaluated. This paper then commences to articulate a theoretical framework that analyzes all of the factors bearing on this paradigm, ranging from the macro to the micro.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Eric Lambert, Yuning Wu, Shanhe Jiang, Karuppannan Jaishankar, Sudershan Pasupuleti, Jagadish Bhimarasetty and Brad Smith

While there is a growing body of studies on the people's views of community policing, there have been a very few cross-national studies. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a growing body of studies on the people's views of community policing, there have been a very few cross-national studies. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast students’ views on community policing from India and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were from a survey from a total of 434 Indian and 484 US college students.

Findings

Punitive orientation had a significant effect on attitudes toward community policing, but was related to an increase in the support in India and reduction of support in the USA. Among the Indian respondents, concern for crime and support for aggressive policing had positive associations with support for community policing, and police involvement in the community had a negative association. Among the US respondents, age, educational level, and perceptions of police effectiveness had positive associations with support for community policing, and holding a punitive orientation had a negative association.

Originality/value

This study represents the attempt to examine Indian perceptions of community policing empirically. Uncovering factors that affect public support for community policing can provide useful references for police administrators to develop policies and practices that encourage more active community involvement in crime control.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Scott Lewis, Helen Rosenberg and Robert T. Sigler

Community policing has evolved from a set of programs to a conceptual framework describing one way that police services can be effectively delivered. As this approach has…

Abstract

Community policing has evolved from a set of programs to a conceptual framework describing one way that police services can be effectively delivered. As this approach has emerged, the level of evaluation of specific programs has been higher than has traditionally been the case. At the present time, program evaluations are becoming more sophisticated and focused. The study reported here was designed to measure the attitudes held by police officers toward community policing with a set of sub‐scales designed to measure different dimensions of the attitudinal construct. Findings are based on a survey of the population of police officers in Racine, Wisconsin, conducted in 1997.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Lilley and Sameer Hinduja

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to compare traditional and community policing agencies with regard to how individual officers are formally evaluated and to…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this research is to compare traditional and community policing agencies with regard to how individual officers are formally evaluated and to assess organizational goals and objectives in each type of agency. Design/methodology/approach – A 75‐item questionnaire was mailed to 600 municipal and county law enforcement agencies. A total of 11 hypotheses were tested regarding performance evaluation content, the values of police supervisors and organizational objectives. FindingsCommunity policing agencies have added new output measures but continue to value enforcement statistics as much as their more traditional counterparts. Additionally, many community policing agencies have not updated their formal systems to incorporate community policing concepts. Research limitations/implications – Survey responses were obtained from only one supervisor per agency and the knowledge of each individual was varied. However, if supervisors from traditional and community policing agencies are equally competent, results should be unbiased. Further research is needed to assess the reasons why many agencies have not updated their formal evaluation systems to incorporate community policing concepts. Practical implications – There may be a conflict between police supervisor values and formal evaluation procedures in many community policing agencies. Further assistance or guidance may be needed to aid police administrators in updating and improving their formal systems of officer performance evaluation. Originality/value – This is the first nationwide assessment of police officer performance evaluation during the community policing era.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Carlos Wing‐Hung Lo and Albert Chun‐Yin Cheuk

This paper is an in‐depth analysis of community policing in Hong Kong. It includes an outline of the evolution of community policing in Hong Kong, identifies the…

Abstract

This paper is an in‐depth analysis of community policing in Hong Kong. It includes an outline of the evolution of community policing in Hong Kong, identifies the structural arrangements for the practice of community policing, examines major community‐based programs that have been launched, evaluates the performance of this strategy, and considers constraints on these policy initiatives. It shows that this community effort has already gone beyond the confines of promoting community relations in Hong Kong. The results have been encouraging. They include a significant improvement in the quality of police‐public interactions, the engagement of the public and their increased support in crime control and prevention, and the beginning of the conversion of traditional police enforcement to that of police services. However, the Force's use of community policing schemes predominantly for the pragmatic purpose of crime control has accounted for the lack of breakthroughs in forging a strategic partnership with the public to promote a secure and harmonious environment.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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