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Publication date: 26 November 2020

Erik Kostelijk

People decide what is good or bad, or what they should or should not do, based on the values they cherish. Someone's values create the feeling that something is important…

Abstract

People decide what is good or bad, or what they should or should not do, based on the values they cherish. Someone's values create the feeling that something is important for him or her, and then motivate him or her to take action. Therefore, personal values are important psychological aspects that serve as predictors of many types of human behaviour. The use of values to evaluate, to predict or to assess behavioural choices and their outcomes has received increasing attention in psychology in recent years. An important psychological insight is that similarities between personal values and values provided by the context (e.g., not only values cherished by the people who are close to us but also values embedded in the brands that are relevant for us or in the communication messages we are confronted with) have an impact on subjective well-being. This psychological insight makes values relevant for other domains as well. This chapter explores the use of values in communication, and introduces mechanisms through which values can be used to stimulate communication effectiveness.

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Åke Finne and Christian Grönroos

This conceptual paper aims at developing a customer-centric marketing communications approach that takes the starting point in the customer ecosystem.

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17614

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper aims at developing a customer-centric marketing communications approach that takes the starting point in the customer ecosystem.

Design/methodology/approach

After a critical analysis of existing marketing communications and integrated marketing communication (IMC) approaches, a customer-driven view of marketing communications is developed using recent developments in relationship communication, customer-dominant logic and the notion of customer value formation as value-in-use.

Findings

A customer-integrated marketing communication (CIMC) approach centred on a communication-in-use concept is conceptually developed and introduced. The analysis results in a CIMC model, where a customer in his or her individual ecosystem, based on integration of a set of messages from different sources, makes sense of the many messages he or she is exposed to.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents a customer-driven perspective on marketing communication and IMC. The analysis is conceptual and should trigger future empirical grounding. It indicates the need for a change in mindset in research.

Practical implications

CIMC requires a turnaround in the mindset that steers how companies and their marketers communicate with customers. The CIMC model provides guidelines for planning marketing communication.

Originality/value

The customer-driven communication-in-use concept and the CIMC model challenge traditional inside-out approaches to planning and implementing marketing communication.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Helena Kantanen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prerequisites of value co-production by a communication consultant and workshop participants during a communication improvement…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prerequisites of value co-production by a communication consultant and workshop participants during a communication improvement programme carried out in a medium-sized family firm.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws from a socio-constructivist view of learning that emphasises participatory processes. It utilises the value co-production concept, referring to collaborative, dialogic activities between the consultant and the client. The theoretical framework includes the transcoder, re-interpreter, and free creator roles of a consultant as realised in a consultancy process characterised by dialogic interaction and equity. The approach is qualitative, and the data come from the expectations of the management team, a video recording of a communication improvement workshop, insights produced in the workshop, and a research journal.

Findings

The roles of a consultant were found to be those of organiser, transcoder, re-interpreter, and co-creator. Additionally, a dialogue facilitator role was highlighted as a central prerequisite of value co-production. The importance of a positive spirit in consultancy sessions was questioned because problems can thereby be hidden behind positivity. The value of confusing or even destructive episodes was emphasised as a source of new perspectives.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations related to the quality of the video recordings, and that the company employees did not yet evaluate the value gained in the long run.

Practical implications

This paper shows that a communication consultant gains insights from company representatives’ insider views in conflict-management situations, and that these conflicts can be useful for organisational learning.

Originality/value

This study contributes to research into strategic communication because it provides new knowledge about the consultant-client interface, particularly in value co-production, in the few studies conducted in the context of SMEs. The study utilises the novel research methodology of video analysis.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2014

Line Schmeltz

– The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

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2389

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test how framing of CSR messages, based on a value-theoretical framework, impacts consumer perception of the CSR message.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative study in the form of an online survey strongly inspired by classical experimental design.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that explicit communication of CSR framed as a corporate competence, and to some extent also as something personally relevant to the receivers, positively impacts evaluations of CSR messages and the companies behind them.

Research limitations/implications

Findings indicate that CSR messages could increasingly emphasize corporate competence with a lesser focus on moral ideas and commitments, and that framing strategies can be effective in creating CSR messages that will be positively evaluated by young consumers.

Originality/value

This study contributes by providing new insights into how value-based framing of CSR messages can increase credibility and relevance and thus help facilitate the complicated task of communicating CSR by way of suggesting a new CSR communication strategy framework.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Kristina Heinonen and Tore Strandvik

The paper explores consumers' responsiveness to marketing communication about various services and products in three different media. Communication value is seen as an…

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9012

Abstract

Purpose

The paper explores consumers' responsiveness to marketing communication about various services and products in three different media. Communication value is seen as an element of service value and is measured as consumer responsiveness to marketing communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data is based on interviews with consumers concerning their perceptions of the relevance and acceptance of marketing communication of 15 different services/products in three media, traditional direct mail, e‐mail and SMS. The consumers have responded to scenarios of marketing communication.

Findings

Findings showed differences in consumer responsiveness to different services and physical products. The overall responsiveness was relatively low for the offerings in all media. A division into responsiveness groups demonstrates that there are also consumers that are positive to communication. The share of positive consumers varies considerably over offerings.

Research limitations/implications

The present study did not account for some important aspects in marketing communication. Firstly, the communication was not considered as part of a firm's integrated marketing communication. The creative element was omitted even if it in practice is important in planned marketing communication. Moreover, the respondents have evaluated scenarios based on their general attitudes toward the communication. The consumer's relationship to the company/brand/offering was excluded. However, despite these limitations it shows that it is necessary to consider that products and services may have different responsiveness patterns.

Practical implications

The emergence of digital media has increased the number of ways to interact with consumers. The variation in the responsiveness to products and services for different media indicates that it is important to have an understanding of how the media adds and subtracts value. The analysis points to the need for companies to measure the responsiveness of consumers in order to understand and enhance consumer perceived value of the communication as a part of the service.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to service marketing research by introducing the communication value and responsiveness conceptualisations that have an interest both for academic research and practitioners. This includes a new perspective on the role of communication on one hand and on the empirical findings of differences in digital interactive media on the other hand.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Ansgar Zerfass and Christine Viertmann

The purpose of this paper is to report on a multi-step research project which explores concepts that explain communication value across different disciplines and builds a…

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7770

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a multi-step research project which explores concepts that explain communication value across different disciplines and builds a framework that identifies and systematizes communication goals linked to generic corporate goals.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review of work on value creation through communication, drawn from 815 publications in 36 international journals across several disciplines (public relations, marketing, management, etc.) and published from the year 2000 onward, the authors have developed a framework, named “Communication Value Circle.” The application of the framework was discussed with chief communication officers from global companies and was used during a communication alignment process in a global healthcare company.

Findings

Empirical surveys across several continents show that communication professionals use a multitude of rationales to explain the value of their work to top executives. These range from building reputation, brands and identity, to gaining thought leadership, boosting sales, motivating employees, preventing crises and listening to stakeholders. The researchers have identified four major value dimensions of communication (enabling operations, building intangibles, adjusting strategy, and ensuring flexibility). The framework encompasses 12 specific goals for communication that can be derived from corporate strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The framework stimulates the debate on the diverse concepts of communication value, performance and measurement, and the need to integrate those approaches into theory and practice. Additional qualitative studies to verify the framework are proposed.

Practical implications

The communication value circle can be used as a management tool for planning, evaluating, and revising strategic directions for communication in any corporation.

Originality/value

Explaining the value of communication continues to be one of the most important challenges for professionals and scholars alike. This paper proposes a consistent explanation for the theory and practice of what constitutes corporate communication.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

In many countries today there is a debate on how to improve accounting to recognise also the non‐material value of companies. As a contribution to this debate, the Swedish…

Abstract

In many countries today there is a debate on how to improve accounting to recognise also the non‐material value of companies. As a contribution to this debate, the Swedish Public Relations Association has initiated a project to develop the know‐how of how a company's profits and value can increase through investments in information, communications and relationships. The project applies also to the public sector and other organisations.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

C.M. Sashi

Technological innovations that resulted in the emergence and widespread adoption of digital communication in recent years have led to a surge of academic and practitioner…

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1151

Abstract

Purpose

Technological innovations that resulted in the emergence and widespread adoption of digital communication in recent years have led to a surge of academic and practitioner interest in its implications for the co-creation of value and customer engagement. However, in comparison to the attention given to the study of customer engagement in consumer markets, few studies have examined its key role in business markets. This paper aims to examine the impact of digital communication on value co-creation and customer engagement in inter-organizational relationships in business networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-creation of value and customer engagement in business networks occurs among interconnected organizations that are partners in intermediate transactions. The paper develops a matrix of inter-organizational engagement among partners in business networks and propositions linking digital communication to value co-creation and inter-organizational engagement.

Findings

The relationships among network organizations may be characterized by the extent of relational exchange and inter-organizational bonds among them. Four types of inter-organizational engagement emerge: transactional partners, loyal partners, trusted partners and engaged partners. The partners co-create value to better satisfy customers.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is an initial attempt to develop a conceptual understanding of customer engagement in business markets and formulate propositions that can be further investigated. Networks of partner organizations co-create value, altering their input and output markets, value addition and products, permitting greater flexibility and customization in satisfying the needs of customers.

Practical implications

The ability afforded by digital communication for real-time interactive communication enables individuals from multiple departments and hierarchical positions within multiple organizations dispersed across geographic locations and industries to maintain contact, quickly and easily communicate task information, build trust and commitment in long-term relationships with network partners and provide superior customer value.

Originality/value

The paper represents a unique attempt to understand the nature of customer engagement in business markets. It discusses how digital communication alters market transactions among partner organizations in a network by facilitating changes in their make/buy decisions. It develops a matrix of inter-organizational engagement in business networks and propositions that improve understanding of the customer engagement concept and provide the foundation for strategies to better satisfy customers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Paul A. Argenti

This research examines the importance of measurement in the communications industry and business in general, the insufficiency of measurement in communications, how

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3892

Abstract

Purpose

This research examines the importance of measurement in the communications industry and business in general, the insufficiency of measurement in communications, how communications professionals' measurement needs are changing, obstacles to meeting measurement needs, and the potential benefits from understanding the link between intangibles and business value.

Design/methodology/approach

Research methods used to link communications activities to business outcomes included statistical analysis (collecting, evaluating, and drawing conclusions from data) of intangible assets, or non‐accounting, non‐financial business drivers such as people, ideas and relationships. Measurement data was based on information companies already owned, including media content analysis data and employee survey results.

Findings

Pilot studies have demonstrated that this model will provide greater insight into how intangibles such as communication activities contribute to business outcomes that matter to senior management and will eliminate the obstacles to measurement – concerns about expense, fear of results, and isolation of the effect of individual activities.

Originality/value

This discussion is essential to understanding that the communications industry in particular and corporations as a whole need a way to add meaning to the data they already have; to link existing data to business outcomes; and to demonstrate that effective communications activities and other intangibles move organizations toward their business objectives.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2020

Maria Palazzo, Agostino Vollero and Alfonso Siano

Increased public scrutiny and stakeholder pressure have given more importance to strategic corporate social responsibility (SCSR) and its three dimensions – orientation…

Abstract

Purpose

Increased public scrutiny and stakeholder pressure have given more importance to strategic corporate social responsibility (SCSR) and its three dimensions – orientation, process and value creation. At the same time, they provide banks the inspiration needed to pursue business goals, attain positive performances and communicate their social responsibility efforts. This paper analyses whether and how companies in the banking sector use corporate websites to communicate SCSR dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis was performed based on the corporate websites of leading banks included in the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index and the Hang Seng Corporate Sustainability Index to assess the prominence of SCSR communication.

Findings

The study shows that banks give less prominence to SCSR on corporate websites differently from companies belonging to other sectors, as they are less likely to expose their orientation to SCSR and pay slightly less attention to value creation than other companies.

Practical implications

The paper provides theoretical insights into SCSR dimensions and how they are communicated on corporate websites. From a practical standpoint, the study provides guidance for managers in the banking sector aimed at improving their communication efforts, avoiding decoupling issues and adopting a consistent value creation perspective.

Originality/value

Few studies have used a value creation perspective to differentiate between the dimensions of a SCSR approach. The paper fills this gap by assessing the communication efforts adopted by banks and insurance companies in this area.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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