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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2021

Agnė Gadeikienė, Asta Pundzienė and Aistė Dovalienė

The rise of telehealth is evident worldwide, especially now with the COVID-19 pandemic situation, and is providing extensive opportunities for health-care organisations to…

Abstract

Purpose

The rise of telehealth is evident worldwide, especially now with the COVID-19 pandemic situation, and is providing extensive opportunities for health-care organisations to create added value for different stakeholders. However, even in this extreme situation, the progress of telehealth is quite slow and insufficient. In this context, it is necessary to consider how the application of telehealth services allows co-creating additional value for different stakeholders. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to explore telehealth services and the added value that they co-create for various stakeholders across publicly and privately oriented health-care ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted a qualitative research design based on an explorative and comparative approach to study the perceived added value that is co-created during telehealth encounters. The authors deployed a semi-structured interview research design. Interviews were carried out in two settings that have different health-care systems: Lithuania (publicly oriented health care) and the California Bay Area, USA, (privately oriented health care). The research covers telehealth services from the point of view of different stakeholders in the health-care ecosystem.

Findings

The paper emphasises that value-in-use is essential in the case of telehealth; however, value-in-exchange is relevant to describe the relationships between public and private insurers and health-care providers. The findings point out that despite the type of health-care system, telehealth added value-in-use was perceived quite similar in both research settings, and differences could be distinguished mainly at the sub-dimensional level. The added value-in-use for patients comprises economic, functional and emotional value; physicians potentially get functional added value-in-use. The authors also highlight that patients and physicians get relational functional and social value-in-use. The added value-in-use for health-care providers consists of economic (in both research settings) and functional value (in Lithuania). The research findings show that there is still an evident lack of health insurance companies ready to recognise telehealth as a valuable service and to reimburse similarly to in cases of in-person visits. Thus, the added value-in-exchange is hardly created and this impedes co-creation of the added value-in-use.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the field mainly by transferring the business research applied concept of value co-creation into the social-purpose driven health-care industry. The findings are beneficial for the health-care management stream of the literature, which considers health care as a value-based industry. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first attempt to structure the perceived telehealth added value from the perspectives of different stakeholders and two different health-care ecosystems. This paper also gives a clearer understanding of the role of the value-in-exchange in such complex ecosystems as health care and gives reasons when it could be created in synergy with co-creation of the value-in-use. In this sense, the findings are beneficial from both marketing and innovation theoretical perspectives, as they give a special attention to value creation and co-creation phenomena analysis.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 8 September 2021

Marcelo Benetti Corrêa Da Silva, Suélen Bebber, Juliana Matte, Mateus Panizzon, Rafael de Lucena Perini and Bianca Libardi

This study aims to analyze factors that may influence the value-in-use perceived by undergraduate students from the built environment, teaching care and hedonic value.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze factors that may influence the value-in-use perceived by undergraduate students from the built environment, teaching care and hedonic value.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey with 900 students from a university in southern Brazil. The main results evidenced that the built environment positively and significantly influences teaching care, hedonic value and value-in-use.

Findings

The hedonic value, teaching care and built environment explain 67.8% of value-in-use; the built environment and teaching care explain 45.1% of hedonic value; and the built environment explains 45.1% of the teaching care. Based on the results, it was possible to identify the value that the built environment and the teaching care represent for university students. Therefore, universities should invest in these dimensions, considering the time and cost students spend on this service to increase their satisfaction and retention.

Originality/value

This study analyzes antecedents of value-in-use perceived by undergraduate students from the built environment, teaching care and hedonic value.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

Gustav Medberg and Christian Grönroos

The definition of value adopted by the current service perspective on marketing theory is value as value-in-use. Surprisingly, however, little attention has been given to…

Abstract

Purpose

The definition of value adopted by the current service perspective on marketing theory is value as value-in-use. Surprisingly, however, little attention has been given to the question of what constitutes value-in-use for customers in service contexts? Therefore, the aim of this study is to provide an empirical account of value-in-use from service customers' point of view.

Design/methodology/approach

To capture and analyze customers' experiences of value-in-use in the typical service context of retail banking, this study employed a narrative-based critical incident technique (CIT) and a graphical tool called the value chart.

Findings

The study identified seven empirical dimensions of positive and negative value-in-use: solution, attitude, convenience, expertise, speed of service, flexibility and monetary costs. Interestingly, these value-in-use dimensions overlap considerably with previously identified dimensions of service quality.

Research limitations/implications

The concepts of service quality and value-in-use in service contexts seem to represent the same empirical phenomenon despite their different theoretical traditions. Measuring customer-perceived service quality might therefore be a good proxy for assessing value-in-use in service contexts.

Practical implications

As the findings indicate that service quality is the way in which service customers experience value-in-use, service managers are recommended to focus on continuous quality management to facilitate the creation of value-in-use.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explicitly raise the notion that in the minds of service customers, value defined as value-in-use and service quality may represent the same empirical phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2018

Jillian C. Sweeney, Carolin Plewa and Ralf Zurbruegg

This paper aims to advance research and practice on value, and more specifically value-in-use, by enhancing knowledge of not only positive but also negative value-in-use

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance research and practice on value, and more specifically value-in-use, by enhancing knowledge of not only positive but also negative value-in-use facets in a complex relational context, developing a psychometrically sound measure of these facets and evaluating their effect on various outcome measures across different customer segments.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage study was undertaken in the professional service context of financial planning. Following a qualitative stage identifying positive and negative facets of value-in-use, a measurement scale was developed and tested, and extended analysis was undertaken through two quantitative stages.

Findings

The findings provide converging evidence that clients in the study context realise value-in-use, defined in this study at a benefit rather than outcome level, through nine core facets, four positive (expertise, education, motivation, convenience) and five negative (monetary, time and effort, lifestyle, emotional [financial planner], emotional [situation]). While all nine facets impact on at least one of the investigated outcomes, results show that, overall, positive value-in-use facets outweigh the negative ones, with the impact of facets varying depending on client factors (such as customer participation and time to retirement).

Originality/value

The primary contributions of this paper lie in the conceptualisation and measurement of both positive and negative value-in-use facets and their interplay in generating customer outcomes, as well as in the development of a psychometrically sound measure of this construct. Negative value-in-use facets have not been explored to date, despite consumers being sometimes more concerned with risks than gains. Furthermore, the research offers novel insight into the impact of both positive and negative value-in-use on relevant outcomes, while also offering evidence as to the importance of segmentation dimensions in this context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Sarah Sayce and Owen Connellan

This paper debates the key concepts of fair value, value in use and existing use, as they relate to the valuation of owner‐occupied property assets. Changes to the…

Abstract

This paper debates the key concepts of fair value, value in use and existing use, as they relate to the valuation of owner‐occupied property assets. Changes to the professional body regulatory and advisory frameworks (International Valuation Standards Committee (IVSC), the European Group of Valuers’ Association (TEGoVA) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)) controlling the valuation of fixed assets for balance‐sheet have taken place. These, it argues, require valuers to re‐appraise the role of existing use value (EUV) as an acceptable valuation concept. The treatment of owner‐occupied property differs with the IVSC no longer recognising EUV, which it holds to be contrary to the principles of fair value, as enshrined within International Accounting Standards. Yet, the basis is still recognised by TEGoVA, which also espouses fair value, whereas the RICS prefer the value to the business model. The crux therefore lies in the interpretation of fair value. This paper argues for the abandonment of EUV in UK and European standards, to fall in line with International Standards. It is contended that, if market value or value in use is the only acceptable approach to accounting valuations, this will have implications for corporate entities and may give their advisers some practical problems. If EUV is abandoned, it also calls into question the appropriateness of DRC (depreciated replacement cost) as a valid surrogate of market value or EUV. The paper contends that fair value embraces both value in exchange and value in use. It argues that EUV fulfils little useful purpose and calls for its abandonment and for the development of an agreed methodology for establishing value in use. In the quest for this it suggests that there would be merit in re‐exploring the notion of going concern value, which was effectively written out of UK practice with the introduction of RICS guidance.

Details

Property Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Priyanka Jayashankar, Wesley J. Johnston, Sree Nilakanta and Reed Burres

This paper aims to discuss the concepts of co-creation and value-in-use with a specific focus on big data technology in agriculture. The authors provide a unique narrative…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss the concepts of co-creation and value-in-use with a specific focus on big data technology in agriculture. The authors provide a unique narrative of how farmers experience co-creation and value-in-use in monetary and non-monetary forms.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative study is based on semi-structured interviews with mid-Western farmers. The constant comparative method was used for coding the data. Results were analyzed through open and axial coding, and matrix queries helped establish linkages between different concepts via NVivo 12.

Findings

The paper provides rich insight into co-creation through direct and indirect interaction, autonomous co-creation and epistemic, monetary and environmental value-in-use in the digital agriculture sector. Interestingly, co-creation through indirect interaction gives rise to epistemic value-in-use. Also, value-co-destruction can undermine co-creation, while relational actors and the concept of psychological ownership are very relevant to the process of co-creation.

Research limitations/implications

The authors build on the extant literature on co-creation in knowledge-intensive B2B sectors with the unique findings linking different forms of co-creation with value-in-use.

Practical implications

The findings on co-creation and value-in-use are beneficial to diverse agriculture stakeholders such as farmers, agriculture technology providers, extension agents and policymakers. Agricultural technology providers can determine how to make the co-creation process more meaningful for farmers and also create suitable technology tools that enrich farmers’ knowledge about crop management. Agricultural stakeholders can learn how to develop big data analytic tools and marketing narratives to maximize value-in-use and pre-empt value co-destruction.

Social implications

The research can impact policy, as it addresses a very relevant issue of how farmers relate to big data technology amidst growing consolidation and privacy concerns in the digital agriculture sector.

Originality/value

Our work is both theoretically and contextually relevant. We incorporate elements of service-dominant and customer-dominant logic while analyzing farmers’ perspectives of co-creation and value-in-use.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Yoshinobu Sato and Mark E. Parry

Recent discussions of value-in-use from the perspective of service dominant logic have focused on the customer’s determination of value and control of the value creation…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent discussions of value-in-use from the perspective of service dominant logic have focused on the customer’s determination of value and control of the value creation process. The purpose of this paper is to extend these discussions by exploring the value creation process in the Japanese tea ceremony and in the kaiseki ryori style of Japanese cuisine, which is based on the Japanese tea ceremony.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical analysis is used to describe the history of the Japanese tea ceremony in Japan and its influence on Japanese culture. key principles underlying the Japanese tea ceremony and their relationship to Zen Buddhism are summarized and the ways in which these principles are reflected in the service provided by Japanese restaurants are explored.

Findings

The two elite restaurants examined in this analysis have designed their service experience to reflect four principles of the tea ceremony: the expression of seasonal feelings, the use of everyday items, ritualized social interactions, and the equality of host and guest. Given these principles, we argue that the tea ceremony and restaurants based on this ceremony imply a co-creation process that is different in three important ways from the process discussed in the co-creation literature. First, the tea ceremony involves dual experiential-value-creation processes. Both the master and the customer experience value-in-use during the delivery of kaiseki cuisine, and the value-in-use each receives is critically dependent on that received by the other. Second, the degree to which value-in-use is created for both parties (the customer and the master) depends on the master’s customization of the service experience based on his knowledge of the customer and that customer’s with the tea ceremony, kaiseki ryori cuisine and Japanese culture.

Research limitations/implications

We hypothesize that the dual experiential-value-creation model is potentially relevant whenever the service process contains an element of artistic creation. Potential examples include concerts, recitals, theatre performances and art exhibitions, as well as more mundane situations in which the service provider derives value-in-use from aesthetic appreciations of the service provider’s art.

Originality/value

Recent discussions of value co-creation argue that the customer controls the value creation process and the determination of value. The authors argue that the tea ceremony can serve as a metaphor for value co-creation in service contexts where the customer’s value creation process depends on the creation of value-in-use by the service provider.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Christian Kowalkowski

This paper aims to examine the notion of value propositions (promises of reciprocal value between service providers and their customers), value‐in‐exchange and value‐in‐use

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the notion of value propositions (promises of reciprocal value between service providers and their customers), value‐in‐exchange and value‐in‐use, all within the conceptual context of service‐dominant (S‐D) logic.

Design/methodology/approach

Responding to calls in the recent literature for an academic critique of S‐D logic, its key constructs, and its application in marketing situations of varying complexity, the paper presents a conceptual analysis of the determinants of value emphasis in value propositions from the S‐D perspective.

Findings

Four guiding principles are derived from a rigorous analysis of the relevant literatures. Ways are discussed in which firms might achieve greater flexibility in designing their market offerings, and thus manage different customer segments using different value propositions. The general conclusion is that the ability to communicate a firm's value propositions strategically and effectively is a new area for the development of competence at the core of competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

The findings pave the way for empirical research into the dynamics of value propositions. Since the main focus of the conceptual framework is on the customer‐provider dyad, future studies should broaden coverage to multilateral settings and networked environments.

Practical implications

Factors that determine the relative emphasis in value propositions between value‐in‐exchange and value‐in‐use are discussed, and the management implications derived from each of the four principles identified.

Originality/value

The paper elaborates the application of S‐D logic in marketing by investigating the determinants of relative emphasis of value propositions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2021

Marcelo Benetti Corrêa da Silva, Juliana Matte, Suélen Bebber, Bianca Libardi and Ana Cristina Fachinelli

This research goal was to analyze factors that may influence value-in-use and satisfaction perceived by university students, from the built environment, price fairness and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research goal was to analyze factors that may influence value-in-use and satisfaction perceived by university students, from the built environment, price fairness and teaching care.

Design/methodology/approach

For this purpose, a survey was conducted with 900 students from a university in southern Brazil.

Findings

The main results proved that the antecedents considered in the study have a significant and positive influence on the value-in-use and satisfaction of university students. Furthermore, the built environment, price fairness, teaching care and satisfaction explained 87.8% of the value-in-use of students, while the built environment, price fairness and teaching care explained 74.9% of student satisfaction.

Originality/value

The study proved that after receiving the educational service, if the student can apply his or her acquired knowledge and skills, he or she will find a fair price, will be satisfied and will obtain value in the service purchased. Thus, even if the educational market is changing in recent years, the importance of the teacher and the built environment are factors that influence price fairness and increase the satisfaction and value-in-use perceived by the student.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Christian Grönroos and Johanna Gummerus

– The purpose of this conceptual paper is to analyse the implications generated by a service perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this conceptual paper is to analyse the implications generated by a service perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual analysis of two approaches to understanding service perspectives, service logic (SL) and service-dominant logic (SDL), reveals direct and indirect marketing implications.

Findings

The SDL is based on a metaphorical view of co-creation and value co-creation, in which the firm, customers and other actors participate in the process that leads to value for customers. The approach is firm-driven; the service provider drives value creation. The managerial implications are not service perspective-based, and co-creation may be imprisoned by its metaphor. In contrast, SL takes an analytical approach, with co-creation concepts that can significantly reinvent marketing from a service perspective. Value gets created in customer processes, and value creation is customer driven. Ten managerial SL principles derived from these analyses offer theoretical and practical conclusions with the potential to reinvent marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The SDL can direct researchers’ and managers’ views towards complex value-generation processes. The SL can analyse this process on a managerial level, to derive customer-centric, service perspective-based opportunities to reinvent marketing.

Practical implications

The analysis and principles help marketing break free from offering only value propositions and become an organisation-wide responsibility. Firms must organise service-influenced marketing and create a customer focus among all employees, beyond conventional marketing.

Originality/value

A service perspective on business has key managerial implications and enables researchers and managers to find new, customer-centric, service-influenced marketing approaches.

1 – 10 of over 1000