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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

Dina Modestus Nziku and Colette Henry

While the topic of women's entrepreneurship continues to grow in academic appeal, the policy aspect is one that has received limited scholarly attention, especially in the context…

Abstract

Purpose

While the topic of women's entrepreneurship continues to grow in academic appeal, the policy aspect is one that has received limited scholarly attention, especially in the context of developing countries. To address this gap in scholarship, the purpose of this paper aims to critically explore women's entrepreneurship policy in Tanzania. The research question asks: How are policies designed to encourage and support entrepreneurship in Tanzania gendered, and how might such policies be (re)designed so that they are more relevant to women entrepreneurs in the Tanzanian context? The authors contribute to extant scholarship by: drawing attention to the particular context for women's entrepreneurship in Tanzania; identifying gender biases inherent in current entrepreneurship policies; offering some recommendations for policymakers and identifying areas worthy of future research attention in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

The study builds on the Global Women's Enterprise Policy project. The authors apply an adapted reading guide technique to analyse and critique relevant entrepreneurship policy documents in Tanzania. The reading guide examines the category and type of document being analysed, key themes, content, language and imagery, as well as the key policy recommendations being offered and their relevance to women's entrepreneurship in Tanzania and the wider sub-Saharan African region. Completed reading guide templates are then coded and collated into an excel spreadsheet. Findings are discussed and critiqued within a regulative, normative and cultural-cognitive framework.

Findings

The study provides rich and valuable insights into the unique context for women's entrepreneurship in Tanzania, shedding new light on how women's entrepreneurship is supported in a particular region of sub-Saharan Africa. Findings reveal that while current policy acknowledges the important role women play in their communities, especially in terms of their contribution to labour, it is geared more towards small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) development than entrepreneurship; this is despite the fact that entrepreneurship is identified as a means to address sustainable development challenges (notably unemployment and poverty) and expand opportunities for socially disadvantaged groups, especially women. Existing policy is essentially “context neutral” and hence relatively ineffective; the gender focus is lacking and there is a failure to take account of the specific context in which Tanzanian women entrepreneurs have to operate. The authors argue for policies designed to support women's entrepreneurship to be formalised and contextualised in their specific geographical and cultural setting. The “institutional pillars” framework allows us to identify areas where contextualisation of women's entrepreneurship policies could be enhanced.

Practical implications

The study implies that, to be effective, policies designed to support women's entrepreneurship need to be formalised and contextualised to their specific geographical and cultural setting. Some areas where this might be achieved are identified. Avenues for future research in this area are also suggested.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in its focus on Tanzania, and its critique of existing policies from a gender and institutional perspective. It also enhances understanding of the unique context in Tanzania for entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2022

Colette Henry and Helle Neergaard

231

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Lori Wagner

Book review by Lori Wagner. Henry, Colette, ed. Entrepreneurship in the Creative Industries: An International Perspective. Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar…

1298

Abstract

Book review by Lori Wagner. Henry, Colette, ed. Entrepreneurship in the Creative Industries: An International Perspective. Cheltenham, UK and Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2007. ISBN 9781845426101

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Colette Henry and Kate Lewis

The purpose of this paper is to review recent published research on entrepreneurship education (EE) specifically within the special issue collections of the journal Education

2025

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review recent published research on entrepreneurship education (EE) specifically within the special issue collections of the journal Education +Training, and to assess the overall contribution to the field. The research questions focus on: What topics are explored by these SI papers? What trends can be observed in relation to country context and methodological approach? How is EE defined in these papers, and how do the papers contribute to the wider entrepreneurship research agenda?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an adapted version of the systematic literature review approach, focusing on the discrete special issues on entrepreneurship/enterprise education published in the journal Education + Training since 2010. A comprehensive reading guide was used to review the papers, with completed data compiled into a single excel spreadsheet to facilitate analysis. A total of 66 papers were reviewed.

Findings

A considerable range of themes, geographical contexts and methodological approaches were used in the papers reviewed. A mix of qualitative and quantitative approaches were also found. The papers were characterised by a strong international and applied dimension, with the core collective contribution of the SI papers laying in their direct relevance to practice.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is limited by its deliberate focus on a discrete set of special issue papers; however, the total of 66 papers included in the review is noteworthy.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the considerable learning that can be garnered from the Education + Training special issue collection for EE practitioners.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first time this discrete collection of special issue papers has been reviewed.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 May 2018

Muhammad Azam Roomi, Sumaira Rehman and Colette Henry

The role of women in Pakistani society – largely embedded in its patriarchal socio–cultural environment – has important implications for women’s entrepreneurial activity in the…

1072

Abstract

Purpose

The role of women in Pakistani society – largely embedded in its patriarchal socio–cultural environment – has important implications for women’s entrepreneurial activity in the country. This study aims to investigate and analyse the influence of informal institutional factors on women’s entry into entrepreneurship in Pakistan, and determine how women exercise agency to cope with the constraints posed by such factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach is used to explore the normative context and lived experiences of women entrepreneurs in relation to the influence of socio–cultural beliefs and attitudes on their entrepreneurial career choices.

Findings

The findings suggest that women’s entrepreneurial career choices both revolve around and are shaped by a complex interplay of socio–cultural influences. Pakistani women entrepreneurs exercise their agency as a means of negotiating gender roles within both household and society, using religious descriptions as a means to justify their entrepreneurial activity.

Research limitations/implications

While every effort has been made to ensure that the data were objectively interpreted, and the derived findings were robustly analysed, the research team acknowledges the many difficulties associated with adopting a social constructionist approach. As articulated by Fletcher (2011), the key issues of contextual objectivity (i.e. where the researcher judges what is important), reflexive turn (the need for the researcher to constantly reconnect with the subject) and potential multiplicity of contexts (the various contextual and potentially conflicting influences on the researcher) presents ongoing challenges for researchers in this field.

Originality/value

This study offers valuable insights into the impact of the informal (socio–cultural) institutional factors on women’s entrepreneurial activity, opening up new avenues for further research. The study also contributes to the women’s entrepreneurship literature from the perspective of an Islamic developing country.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Kate Lewis and Colette Henry

289

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2020

Colette Henry, Lene Foss and Kate V. Lewis

535

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Colette Henry, Barbara Orser, Susan Coleman and Lene Foss

Government attention to women’s entrepreneurship has increased in the past two decades; however, there are few cross-cultural studies to inform policy development. This paper aims…

1419

Abstract

Purpose

Government attention to women’s entrepreneurship has increased in the past two decades; however, there are few cross-cultural studies to inform policy development. This paper aims to draw on gender and institutional theory to report on the status of female-focused small and medium-sized enterprises/entrepreneurship policies and to ask how – and to what extent – do women’s entrepreneurship policies differ among countries?

Design/methodology/approach

A common methodological approach is used to identify gaps in the policy-practice nexus.

Findings

The study highlights countries where policy is weak but practice is strong, and vice versa.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s data were restricted to policy documents and observations of practices and initiatives on the ground.

Practical implications

The findings have implications for policy makers in respect of support for women’s entrepreneurship. Recommendations for future research are advanced.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to extant knowledge and understanding about entrepreneurship policy, specifically in relation to women’s entrepreneurship. It is also one of the few studies to use a common methodological approach to explore and compare women’s entrepreneurship policies in 13 countries.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Lene Foss and Colette Henry

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Colette Henry

The purpose of this paper is to explore current entrepreneurship and enterprise education policy in the UK. The way is which such education is defined and conceptualised in…

2019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore current entrepreneurship and enterprise education policy in the UK. The way is which such education is defined and conceptualised in current policy discourse is discussed. The key question addressed in the paper is whether policy makers are expecting too much from current entrepreneurship provision in UK HE.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual, perspective style paper, drawing mainly on entrepreneurship and enterprise education policy documents in the UK as well as related reports and academic literatures mainly published within the last decade. As such, its main intention is to prompt further debate and research in this area.

Findings

The paper helps further our understanding of entrepreneurship and enterprise education as portrayed in current policy documents, and suggests that expectations of outcomes from its inclusion in higher education (HE) may have spiralled beyond what is both realistic and possible. The author argues for a more realistic and measurable perspective of the expectations of entrepreneurship and enterprise education in HE, particularly in non-traditional discipline areas, and suggests that policy in this regard is in need of realignment.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is based mainly on UK entrepreneurship and enterprise education policy documents published within the last decade, as well as related papers.

Practical implications

The paper has implications for educators and policy makers in terms of curriculum design and expectations.

Originality/value

The paper should be of value to researchers, educators and those involved in curricula design in the area of entrepreneurship and enterprise education. The paper should be of particular value to policy makers in the context of helping them to be more realistic in relation to their expectations of such education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 55 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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