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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Chris Deri

Increasingly, the attitudes of consumers are being shaped by an array of advocacy organizations that research and campaign on various social and political causes collectively…

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Abstract

Increasingly, the attitudes of consumers are being shaped by an array of advocacy organizations that research and campaign on various social and political causes collectively categorized as non‐government organizations (NGOs). They are the key driver in the public’s increasing demand that corporations act in a socially responsible way. This means not only offering products and services that do not pose new environmental or social risks but also doing business in a way that supports the livelihood of people in the producing nations and sustainability of our planet’s eco‐systems. NGOs are powerful with consumers because they are significantly more trusted overall than business. CEOs and corporate managers may approve or disapprove of the growing role of activist NGOs, but it is perilous to ignore their growing influence and ability to shape public perceptions of a company. There are seven guiding principles for successfully engaging the NGOs: (1) act and respond as one global brand, making certain that, for example, the environmental practices by a unit in Spain are consistent with the corporate position in the USA; (2) prepare for greater transparency, reporting social and environmental impacts as well as financial information is a starting point for building greater trust and dialogue with the NGOs; (3) do not be forced into a “yes‐or‐no” public confrontation on any issue; (4) enlist and engage multiple partners and perspectives on business practices and strategies; (5) do not rely solely on industry‐wide action, or hide behind it; (6) distinguish between an NGO’s rhetoric and its actual objectives; and (7) know when to stand your ground.

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Robert M. Randall

179

Abstract

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Catherine Gorrell

65

Abstract

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Strategy & Leadership, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1977

As controversy rages about the development of nuclear power, Britain's traditional energy source — the coal mines — continue their inexorable decline. The closure of Bargoed …

Abstract

As controversy rages about the development of nuclear power, Britain's traditional energy source — the coal mines — continue their inexorable decline. The closure of Bargoed — like others in South Wales — brings not only a mixture of relief and regret for the community directly involved; it again highlights the risks of running down one energy sector when an acceptable alternative has yet to be found. Report by Diana Reynolds. Photographs: Chris Fairclough.

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Industrial Management, vol. 77 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Nikos Smyrnaios

Abstract

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Internet Oligopoly
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-197-1

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

214

Abstract

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Library Hi Tech News, vol. 27 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Abstract

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Internet Oligopoly
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-197-1

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Gregory A. Kuhlemeyer, M. Cary Collins and Harold A. Black

Refers to previous research on the effects of poor external audits on agency costs to shareholders and takes the 1991 disciplinary action by the US Securities and Exchange…

Abstract

Refers to previous research on the effects of poor external audits on agency costs to shareholders and takes the 1991 disciplinary action by the US Securities and Exchange Commission against Ernst and Young (re the Republic Bank) as an example to examine the effect on its other audit clients and on financial institutions. Uses event study methods to show that there were no statistically abnormal returns for financial institutions or for Ernst and Young’s audit clients; but significant negative returns for firms audited by non‐big six auditors.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

WHEN these words will be read, those who do so will know the worst—and the best—that the Chancellor of the Exchequer has done to them. We, not having a crystal ball, nor much…

Abstract

WHEN these words will be read, those who do so will know the worst—and the best—that the Chancellor of the Exchequer has done to them. We, not having a crystal ball, nor much faith in such, are thereby handicapped for we must write only days before the speech is given.

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Work Study, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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