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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

Dawn B. Homer, Kim R. Matthews and Chris C. Warkup

Sausages from three major retail outlets producing their own label pork and reduced fat sausages were sampled over a period of four weeks. A branded product was also purchased…

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Abstract

Sausages from three major retail outlets producing their own label pork and reduced fat sausages were sampled over a period of four weeks. A branded product was also purchased from the stores. A trained sensory panel evaluated the sausages and found that, although the overall acceptability differed between retailers, one of the low fat products matched the equivalent standard product in terms of acceptability. The overall acceptability of the branded product was within the range of the own label standard products but below the most acceptable low fat product. It was concluded that, whilst the successful production of low fat sausages is possible, a wider range would be encouraged by the adoption of modified compositional standards.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Huw E. Jones, R.M. Lewis and Chris C. Warkup

A questionnaire‐based survey was conducted to establish the current market requirements for lamb and those likely in the future. Two questionnaires were produced and sent to the…

Abstract

A questionnaire‐based survey was conducted to establish the current market requirements for lamb and those likely in the future. Two questionnaires were produced and sent to the largest lamb abattoirs and retailers in the UK. Current markets generally require a carcass of weight 16‐21kg, conformation E‐R and fat score 2 or 3L. The forecast for future requirements was not clear, but some respondents expressed a desire to narrow the specification ranges given and also to increasingly use carcasses heavier than 21kg to supply bone‐less lamb. A two market scenario, one for medium sized lambs to supply bone‐in cuts and the other for heavier, lean carcasses to supply the boneless lamb, may develop in the long term. The results of this study form a useful basis on which to decide on suitable objectives for genetic improvement programs for sheep breeds, which can be used to help lamb producers meet the requirements of current and likely future markets.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 105 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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