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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Iván D. Sánchez, María Sitú and Laura Murillo

This study aims to analyze the role of trust in the leader as a contextual factor and the personality of the employee as an individual factor in the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the role of trust in the leader as a contextual factor and the personality of the employee as an individual factor in the relationship between transformational leadership (TFL) and resistance to change (RC).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 170 surveys were applied to employees in two organizations that had recently implemented a change. Using hierarchical regression and Hayes’ PROCESS macro, both direct and indirect relationships were analyzed.

Findings

The results show that TFL is negatively related to RC. Nevertheless, such a relationship is partially mediated by trust in the leader and moderated by two employee personality traits (openness and neuroticism), both of which strengthen the relationship. Similarly, employee’s openness to experience is negatively related to RC.

Originality/value

This research contributes to understand the relationship between leadership and RC, incorporating both contextual and individual factors, as literature has debated over whether resistant to change obeys to factors surrounding the employees, or within them. While this research contributes to this approach, its contributions extend beyond the leadership–resistance relationship to include indirect (mediation and moderation) relationships. Consideration of the moderating role of the employee’s personality in the effect of the leader’s behavior on the employee’s resistance, for instance, contributes to the development of a theoretical logic that helps to explain the leader–follower interaction and its effect on the follower’s attitudes and behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Beth Fouracre, Joseph Fisher, Richard Bolden, Beth Coombs, Beth Isaac and Chris Pawson

The purpose of this paper is to present insights into the way in which system change can be activated around the provision of services and support for people experiencing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present insights into the way in which system change can be activated around the provision of services and support for people experiencing multiple disadvantages in an urban setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is informed by a thematic analysis of reflections, reports, learning logs, interviews and experiences of those “activating” system change in the Golden Key partnership in Bristol between 2014 and 2021.

Findings

Four themes are identified, including “creating the conditions for change”, “framing your involvement”, “investing in relationships” and “reflective practice and learning”. For each of these, an illustrative vignette is provided.

Practical implications

Practical recommendations and reflective questions are provided with suggestions of further considerations for applying this approach in different contexts.

Originality/value

This paper describes an original approach of activating and supporting people to do system change to improve the lives of people facing multiple disadvantages.

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Keith A. Fredin

This paper evaluates the value and necessity of greater equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in Canadian fire departments. Rather than focussing on changing hiring…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper evaluates the value and necessity of greater equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) in Canadian fire departments. Rather than focussing on changing hiring practices, the paper seeks to highlight how leadership can implement a culture of EDI that will encourage all people to participate.

Design/methodology/approach

From a leadership perspective, this paper aims to show how EDI can improve firefighter teamwork and job performance whilst satisfying moral obligations to better represent Canadian communities. Strategies and their limitations for communication and culture change are discussed.

Findings

Leaders of Canadian fire departments can utilise organisational change models focussing on improved communication techniques and models to implement cultural changes needed to allow for more EDI. Specific recommendations based on business research into culture change, communication and EDI are outlined.

Practical implications

Recommendations to fire department leadership for cultural changes and communication are provided. Further, strategies and reasoning for why inclusive departments are more effective are given.

Social implications

Creating a more inclusive culture in fire departments will lead to an increase in applications from people who have not typically applied in the past.

Originality/value

There has been little research or recommendations on increasing EDI in Canadian fire departments through cultural changes. Most existing literature is vague and tends to focus on hiring practices over an analysis of internal culture. This article provides analysis of best business practices and applies those to the cultural context of fire departments to promote culture change.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Team for Change: A Practitioner's Guide to Implementing Change in the Modern Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-017-4

Abstract

Details

Purpose-driven Innovation: Lessons from Managing Change in the United Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-143-6

Abstract

Details

Purpose-driven Innovation: Lessons from Managing Change in the United Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-143-6

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Anna-Therése Järvenpää, Johan Larsson and Per Erik Eriksson

For a number of years, the construction industry has seen an ongoing shift from design-bid-build to design-build contracts. This transition in contract type entails changes

Abstract

Purpose

For a number of years, the construction industry has seen an ongoing shift from design-bid-build to design-build contracts. This transition in contract type entails changes for both the organizations and the individuals involved. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the client manages the transition between the different contract types from an organizational change perspective in a project-led organization.

Design/Methodology/Approach

A multiple case study of six infrastructure projects with DB contracts, all managed by the Swedish Transport Administration, was conducted. The major source of data is semi-structured interviews with respondents from both the client and the contractors.

Findings

Results suggest that the transition has resulted in a mix of design-bid-build and design-build as contract type owing to issues when changing in a project-led organization. A change in vision also requires a concomitant change in culture, systems and roles.

Research Limitations/Implications

The study only includes cases from the Swedish transport infrastructure sector, which limits the generalizability. The findings are also indicative owing to the small number of cases.

Practical Implications

The findings further our understanding of managing change in complex projects, which might help practitioners to manage change in a more integrated way.

Originality/Value

The findings enrich our understanding of the systemic change that a switch in contract types can have in inter-organizational complex projects such as transport infrastructure projects. Furthermore, it emphasizes the intricate task of change management in project-led organizations and its effects on roles and responsibilities.

Details

10th Nordic Conference on Construction Economics and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-051-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Casey J. Dawkins

Purpose – Evidence suggests that during the 1990s, many US metropolitan areas saw fundamental changes in the spatial distribution of household income. Following two…

Abstract

Purpose – Evidence suggests that during the 1990s, many US metropolitan areas saw fundamental changes in the spatial distribution of household income. Following two decades of increasing economic segregation, many metropolitan neighborhoods saw declines in economic segregation, particularly those neighborhoods located within central cities and rural areas. This paper adapts the Spatial Ordering Index proposed by Dawkins (2007b) to explore these trends.

Methodology/Approach – Using US Census data, I calculate economic segregation indices for a sample of 205 US metropolitan areas in 1990 and 2000 and decompose changes in the indices into portions attributable to changes in the spatial distribution of households and portions capturing changes in the spatial distribution of aggregate income. I also examine regional variations in the decompositions.

Findings – The results suggest that changes in the spatial distribution of households and of income each influenced metropolitan economic segregation in different ways during the 1990s. Furthermore, the spatial dynamics of income segregation exhibited significant regional heterogeneity.

Originality/Value of paper – This paper presents a new approach to measuring the dynamics of economic segregation.

Details

Occupational and Residential Segregation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-786-4

Abstract

Details

Environmental Security in Greece
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-360-4

Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Peterson K. Ozili

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter discusses the need for climate change risk mitigation and why it is not the responsibility of Central Banks to mitigate climate change risk.

Methodology: This chapter uses critical discourse analysis to explain why central banks should not have the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation.

Findings: This chapter argues that the responsibility for managing climate change risk should lie with elected officials, other groups and institutions but not Central Banks. Elected officials, or politicians, should be held responsible to deal with the consequence of climate change events. Also, international organizations and everybody can take responsibility for climate change while the Central Bank can provide assistance – but Central Banks should not lead the climate policy making or mitigation agenda.

Implication: The policy implication is that the responsibility for climate change risk mitigation should be shifted to politicians who are elected officials of the people. Also, international climate change organizations or groups can take responsibility for mitigating the climate change risk of member countries. Finally, citizens in a country or region should have equal responsibility for climate change. Climate information should be provided to every citizen to help them prepare for future climatic conditions.

Originality: This chapter propagates the idea that Central Banks should take a lead role in dealing with the problems of climate change. This chapter is the first chapter to contest a Central Bank-led climate change risk mitigation agenda.

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