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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2020

Gavin Foster

Anecdotal feedback obtained from alcohol and drug and mental health staff across the eastern metropolitan region of Melbourne, Australia suggests that attitudes towards…

Abstract

Purpose

Anecdotal feedback obtained from alcohol and drug and mental health staff across the eastern metropolitan region of Melbourne, Australia suggests that attitudes towards working with people experiencing a dual diagnosis are becoming more positive. The purpose of this paper is to understand if dual diagnosis-specific training delivered to staff within mental health and alcohol and other drug services was a factor positively influencing attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

No formal evaluation assessing the impact of dual diagnosis-specific training on staff attitudes had previously occurred within this region of Australia. Access to staff on two occasions from three distinct sectors provided an opportunity to examine if and, to what degree, attitudes can be influenced by dual diagnosis-specific training. Using a co-designed attitudes survey, information was gathered from mental health and alcohol and drug staff on their attitudes to working with people with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems.

Findings

Two surveys were conducted involving 186 staff in 2012 and 110 staff in 2016. The dual diagnosis attitudes survey showed that positive attitudes to working with people experiencing a dual diagnosis were associated with recency of training. While attitudes may be improved by dual diagnosis training, these findings cannot exclude the impact of other dual diagnosis capacity building activities.

Originality/value

This study highlights the benefits of a regional partnership between mental health and alcohol and drug services and people with lived experience of dual diagnosis and the benefit of recent co-designed dual diagnosis training on longitudinally assessed worker attitudes.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2009

Keith Walley, Paul Custance, Gaynor Orton, Stephen Parsons, Adam Lindgreen and Martin Hingley

The aim of this article is to consolidate the theory relating to longitudinal attitude surveys, and supplement it with knowledge gained from the execution of an annual…

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2767

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to consolidate the theory relating to longitudinal attitude surveys, and supplement it with knowledge gained from the execution of an annual attitude survey of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the article presents a distillation of current knowledge concerning longitudinal research; attitudes and behaviour; measurement of attitudes; and conduct of attitude surveys. Following that, a case study is carried out to survey consumer attitudes. This survey, which is intended to predict future behaviour and monitor changes in consumers' attitudes in response to socio‐political and economic changes in the food and agricultural market environment, is then discussed.

Findings

The findings of a series of annual surveys of consumers' attitudes first conducted in 1997 and continued annually to 2004 include: British farmers are viewed as “good food producers”; farms are businesses, which whilst forming the financial backbone of the rural community are at present members of a struggling industry; and there is agreement that the Government does not care for the countryside.

Research limitations/implications

The survey on which the findings and the best practices are based upon relates to the consumers' attitudes in response to changes in the food and agricultural market environment. Further research would be required to verify the findings in respect of other market sections.

Practical implications

The article presents a checklist of eight good practices relating to the conduct of longitudinal attitude survey work.

Originality/value

Attitude surveys are a popular means of gathering market research data. Much has been written about attitudes and the conduct of ad hoc attitude surveys. However, much less has been published concerning longitudinal attitude surveys. The study reports empirical findings in an important context, that is: changes in consumers' attitudes in response to changes in the food and agricultural market environment.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 18 December 2016

Diana Onu

This brief paper discusses the relevance of conducting surveys that measure individuals’ attitudes for understanding fiscal behaviour. While many surveys assess…

Abstract

This brief paper discusses the relevance of conducting surveys that measure individuals’ attitudes for understanding fiscal behaviour. While many surveys assess individuals’ attitudes towards paying taxes (e.g. by asking them to what extent they believe tax evasion is ever justified), it is less clear whether individuals’ responses to such survey questions are indicative of the way they would behave in reality. The paper presents a discussion of the way attitudes have been assessed in tax surveys and assesses existing evidence to support a link between these attitude measures and actual compliance behaviour. The paper suggests several avenues to improve the predictive value of attitude measures, such as increasing the specificity of measures, using evaluation scales or mitigating social desirability biases. A series of recommendations are made for measuring attitudes and interpreting attitude surveys for the use of researchers planning to conduct survey work, as well as for the use of findings from taxpayer surveys in the design of tax policy and administration.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Michael Smith

Campaigns to improve public attitudes to people with mental health problems have yet to show significant impact, according to national surveys. But how reliable are these…

Abstract

Campaigns to improve public attitudes to people with mental health problems have yet to show significant impact, according to national surveys. But how reliable are these surveys? Michael Smith reviews recent research in the UK and in Scotland and argues that their findings are complicated by methodological bias and doubts about the public's ability to acknowledge prejudice honestly.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

MF ANDERSON

An employee attitude survey can be described as a diagnostic tool which collects large amounts of information under controlled conditions. It acts as a vehicle for…

Abstract

An employee attitude survey can be described as a diagnostic tool which collects large amounts of information under controlled conditions. It acts as a vehicle for communication, allowing employees to express their satisfaction and ideas for improvement as well as offering management unique and practical information to assist the problem‐solving process.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Rachel Spacey, Anne Goulding and Ian Murray

An investigation into the attitudes of public library staff in the UK towards the Internet involved use of a mixture of quantitative and qualitative research methods. The…

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Abstract

An investigation into the attitudes of public library staff in the UK towards the Internet involved use of a mixture of quantitative and qualitative research methods. The use of an attitude measurement model, an amended version of the technology acceptance model in a questionnaire survey is detailed here and its value to the study in question deliberated on. Quantitative results suggest that attitudes towards use of the Internet are strongly related to usefulness, intention and actual usage. Analysis of the quantitative results suggests that staff are generally positive in their evaluations of the Internet, although a minority of staff possess negative attitudes to ICT.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 60 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2008

Ingwer Borg, Michael Braun and Miriam K. Baumgärtner

The purpose of this research is to investigate whether the participants in an employee survey who do not answer one or more demographic items differ systematically from…

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1511

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate whether the participants in an employee survey who do not answer one or more demographic items differ systematically from those who fill out all demographic items.

Design/methodology/approach

Logistic regression, with affective commitment, job satisfaction, and attitude towards leadership as predictors of responding to demographic items is used to analyze the data of an employee survey in a German company.

Findings

Survey participants with low commitment, poor job satisfaction, and negative attitudes towards leadership are more likely not to provide demographic information, while highly committed participants tend to answer all demographic items. Non‐respondents are also more concerned that their skills become obsolete, and they feel that employees do not have enough say.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not distinguish among demographic item non‐respondents on the basis of how many and which items are omitted. Future research should take a closer look at the different sensitivity of the demographic items.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware that it is likely that the results of an employee survey for their organizational subunits tend to be biased and show a picture that is too optimistic as compared to company‐wide results.

Originality/value

The value of the paper lies in demonstrating a systematic and practically important bias in employee survey statistics that has been overlooked so far.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

D. Matthew Godfrey and Patrick Feng

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of a science-based environmental communication campaign at a university dining hall. The impacts are assessed in terms of…

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2098

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impacts of a science-based environmental communication campaign at a university dining hall. The impacts are assessed in terms of student attitudes toward sustainability, food consumption choices and perceptions and understanding of the campaign and the information it communicated.

Design/methodology/approach

A communication campaign was designed to convey the water footprint of food entrées available at a university dining hall. This campaign was tested during a three-week field experiment in which students at the dining hall were exposed to information about the sustainability of their food. To measure behavior and attitude change, sales and production data were collected before, during and after the campaign, and pre- and post-test surveys were administered. To better understand perceptions, the authors conducted in-depth interviews with undergraduate students who frequented the dining hall.

Findings

Consumption patterns did not change significantly as a result of the campaign, and students’ attitude scores actually became slightly less positive toward choosing low water footprint foods. Interview data helped explain these results by showing that the ability and desire of students to choose sustainable food were overwhelmed by convenience and time pressures; other food attributes often outweighed sustainability; limited food source information could not verify the benefits of sustainable food; and the science of water footprints was disconnected from students’ subjective concepts of sustainability.

Originality/value

This paper empirically examines how students understand and interpret an environmental change campaign focused on sustainable food. It addresses an important gap in the literature by augmenting experimental and survey results with in-depth interview data, which help explain the often ineffective outcomes of behavior change campaigns. The research was conducted in the novel setting of a university dining hall.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1986

William J. Rothwell and H.C. Kazanas

This article discusses the place of the survey as one approach to human resource strategic planning. Viewed as a simple, efficient and effective approach to be used in the…

Abstract

This article discusses the place of the survey as one approach to human resource strategic planning. Viewed as a simple, efficient and effective approach to be used in the overall strategic planning process, the survey may produce desirable results that would be acceptable to all involved. It also provides opportunities to many individuals in the organisation to become directly or indirectly involved in the planning process, a phenomenon that is increasing in importance to management and non‐management people.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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