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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Minyu Wu and Kun Kong

This paper aims to investigate the corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives adopted by Chinese firms during the outbreak of COVID-19. Facing this unknown…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives adopted by Chinese firms during the outbreak of COVID-19. Facing this unknown, unexpected and devastating disease, Chinese corporations demonstrated their CSR in different approaches. The purpose of this paper is to explore how CSR influences the decisions of the corporations that respond to a severe incident and how corporations can achieve their mission or strategic objectives by responding to a serious incident.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on secondary data and thematic analysis, this paper examines six Chinese corporations which are the leading firms in their respective industries.

Findings

This paper finds that firms adopted a mixed approach to conducting their CSR initiatives, including altruistic, strategic and citizenship CSR initiatives. This paper also confirms that strategic CSR initiatives were in line with the five dimensions of strategic CSR including centrality, specificity, proactivity, visibility and voluntarism. In addition, this paper also shows that a company could create its competitive advantage by carrying out CSR initiatives that are able to strengthen its value chain activities or the competitive context. This is based on the partnership built by the firms with their stakeholders to recognize the shared value.

Practical implications

This paper shows the implication that business leaders should understood the role of a business in society and the importance of stakeholders’ expectations. The underlying philosophy is that CSR could strengthen the resilience of society; business organizations need to operate in a healthy society.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights of Chinese corporations responding to a severe social incident. It highlights the strategic perspective of CSR initiatives and the linkage between CSR activities and a firm’s competitive advantage.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Ingrid M. O'Brien, Robyn Ouschan, Wade Jarvis and Geoffrey Norman Soutar

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of CSR initiative preference, customer helping orientation and customer participation on willingness to engage in CSR and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impact of CSR initiative preference, customer helping orientation and customer participation on willingness to engage in CSR and to demonstrate the influence this engagement has on their commitment and loyalty to the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study entailed an online survey of customers from a large not-for-profit organisation (n = 210). Choice modelling is used to test a structural equation model of drivers and outcomes of willingness to engage in CSR.

Findings

Results demonstrate the CSR initiative preferred by customers has a stronger impact on their willingness to engage with the CSR initiative (volunteering their time, effort, money) than either customers' helping orientation or customer participation. Furthermore, willingness to engage in CSR influences customer commitment and loyalty to support and recommend the organisation.

Research limitations/implications

The results clearly demonstrate the significant impact that customers' preferences for and willingness to engage in CSR initiatives have on customers' relationship with not-for-profit organisations.

Social implications

The results highlight the importance of taking into account customer preferences for CSR issues to encourage customers to engage in CSR initiatives designed to benefit society.

Originality/value

Traditionally CSR literature has focused on how commercial firms' engagement in CSR creates value for the firm and society. The marketing literature has focused on how customer engagement in brand communities benefits the firm. This study extends the research by exploring customers’ willingness to engage in CSR with not-for-profit organisations. It uses Choice modelling to demonstrate the impact of customer preferences for local and aligned CSR initiatives on customer willingness to engage.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Wade Jarvis, Robyn Ouschan, Henry J. Burton, Geoffrey Soutar and Ingrid M. O’Brien

Both customer engagement (CE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been linked to customer loyalty. Past studies use service dominant logic and customer value…

Abstract

Purpose

Both customer engagement (CE) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) have been linked to customer loyalty. Past studies use service dominant logic and customer value co-creation to explain this relationship. The purpose of this paper is to apply utility theory to develop and test a new theoretical model based on CSR initiative preference to understand the relationship between CE and customer loyalty to the organisation in a CSR platform.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study uses choice theory in the form of best-worst scaling, and structural equation modelling, to measure the impact of sports club members’ choice preferences for a range of CSR initiatives on their intention to engage with the initiative and subsequent loyalty to the club.

Findings

This study highlights the importance of engaging members in the CSR strategy they prefer as it enhances not only the extra value to the organisation via customer loyalty to the organisation, but also CE with the organisation. Furthermore, the study reveals age and gender impact on the relationship between CE in CSR initiatives and customer loyalty.

Originality/value

This study extends CE to CSR behaviours and provides empirical evidence for a unique theoretical framework of CE based on utility theory. It also highlights the need to take into account moderating variables such as customer demographics.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Grzegorz Zasuwa

Literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR) posits that organisational motives underlying corporate social initiatives play a key role in stakeholder responses to…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature on corporate social responsibility (CSR) posits that organisational motives underlying corporate social initiatives play a key role in stakeholder responses to these activities. However, individuals do not always make attributions. This study aims to examine when CSR attributions shape consumer reactions to CSR initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on attribution theory and relevant literature on consumer trust, this study proposes a framework for explaining when attributions shape reactions to CSR initiatives. To test this framework, the study uses data from a random sample of 512 Polish consumers.

Findings

The results show that consumer responses to corporate social initiatives are largely independent of perceived corporate motivation when a consumer has a high trust in the firm. However, a low level of initial trust triggers causal thinking and its effects. Specifically, if a firm lacks credibility, self-serving attributions negatively influence consumer outcomes of social initiatives, but they remain neutral when trust is high. Accordingly, when trust is low, other-serving attributions have greater effects on the initiative outcomes than when trust is high.

Originality/value

The paper provides important insights into CSR literature by showing that initial trust in the company is a salient variable that moderates the link between CSR attributions and consumer responses to these actions. This role of trust has been largely unexplored as past studies considered trust in the firm to be a key outcome of corporate social performance.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 15 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2018

Joon Kyoung Kim, Holly Overton, Kevin Hull and Minhee Choi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the public views two corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives practiced by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how the public views two corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives practiced by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team. This study examined the role of perceived fit between an MLB team and its two CSR initiatives in shaping consumers’ intentions to support the team’s CSR efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experiment (n=207) was conducted using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to examine the impact of CSR fit on consumers’ patronage intentions.

Findings

The results of this study showed that consumers’ perceived fit between sports teams and their CSR has a positive impact on consumers’ patronage intentions. The values-driven and strategic-driven attributions of the team’s CSR initiatives were positively associated with their patronage intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Both the values-driven and strategic-driven attributions were positively associated with consumers’ patronage intentions, while previous studies suggested negative association between strategic-driven attributions and consumer behaviors. The findings indicate that consumers do not view professional sports teams’ strategic-driven CSR initiatives to be negative business practices. This could result from the fact that CSR initiatives have become a prevalent and expected organizational practice.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature of CSR within the context of professional sports teams as corporations. The findings of this study suggest that professional sports teams could benefit from CSR initiatives when the teams select social causes with which consumers could infer values-driven and strategic-driven attributions.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2008

Lynette M. McDonald and Sharyn Rundle‐Thiele

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer outcomes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and customer outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the literature on CSR effects and satisfaction, noting gaps in the literature.

Findings

A series of propositions is put forward to guide future research endeavours.

Research limitations/implications

By understanding the likely impact on customer satisfaction of CSR initiatives vis‐à‐vis customer‐centric initiatives, the academic research community can assist managers to understand how to best allocate company resources in situations of low customer satisfaction. Such endeavours are managerially relevant and topical. Researchers seeking to test the propositions put forward in this paper would be able to gain links with, and possibly attract funding from, banks to conduct their research. Such endeavours may assist researchers to redefine the stakeholder view by placing customers at the centre of a network of stakeholders.

Practical implications

An understanding of how to best allocate company resources to increase the proportion of satisfied customers will allow bank marketers to reduce customer churn and hence increase market share and profits.

Originality/value

Researchers have not previously conducted a comparative analysis of the effects of different CSR initiatives on customer satisfaction, nor considered whether more customer‐centric initiatives are likely to be more effective in increasing the proportion of satisfied customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2020

Virginia Munro

As part of discussing future research in the era of change for Globalization 4.0, this chapter examines the traditional academic CSR literature to determine a gap in…

Abstract

As part of discussing future research in the era of change for Globalization 4.0, this chapter examines the traditional academic CSR literature to determine a gap in current research. An academic literature search revealed limited literature on actual CSR activities, and more specifically, Social Initiatives (SIs). It is important to expand on this area of research as it relates to an evolution of the original CSR definition by Carroll (1979, 1999). The literature review also revealed limited use of Social Identity Theory in CSR studies: a theory which provides an excellent context to give ‘purpose’ and meaning to a more socially oriented form of CSR. It also provides a base to understand human ‘identification’ and ‘identity’ with CSR activities, in a new era of change. Recent research reveals the importance of understanding what employees and global citizens as stakeholders want, need, identify, and engage with. Following a literature review, this chapter introduces a new ‘Social Initiatives Framework,’ designed to incorporate the many terms and alternative themes associated with CSR. The chapter concludes with extracts from an example paper for this area of research, and provides a model to examine changing stakeholder perspectives in global settings. The findings behind the development of the model is discussed, revealing substantial opportunities for future research. The chapter highlights the development of CSR SIs to study the sustainable development goals, while also supporting social enterprises to solve wicked challenges and create shared value (CSV) for both the host community and the company within the setting where the organization resides.

Details

CSR for Purpose, Shared Value and Deep Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-035-8

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Book part
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Susan A. Kayser

Previous work has shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives can preserve shareholder value after an organization experiences a negative event. I expand…

Abstract

Previous work has shown that corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives can preserve shareholder value after an organization experiences a negative event. I expand on this theory by examining one boundary condition that could lead to the opposite relationship: when the organization has a CSR initiative intended to prevent the type of event that occurs. The author argues that activist pressure will enhance the negative relationship between event-specific CSR and shareholder value. Using an event-study, the author examines the apparel industry after the collapse of Rana Plaza which killed over a thousand apparel supply chain employees.

Details

Social Movements, Stakeholders and Non-Market Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-349-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 April 2020

Geumchan Hwang, Lisa A. Kihl and Yuhei Inoue

This study examined how a US college athletic department’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influenced fans’ online donation intentions.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined how a US college athletic department’s corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives influenced fans’ online donation intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 490 fans of a Division I intercollegiate athletic program and analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results indicated that the quality of CSR information positively affected e-satisfaction with CSR initiatives, which, in turn, predicted fans’ online donation intentions, university attachment, and fan–athletic department identification. Moreover, the relationship between e-satisfaction with CSR initiatives and online donation intentions was mediated by fan–athletic department identification.

Research limitations/implications

This study has a limitation in terms of generalizability. The current focus on a single athletic department does not apply the results to athletic programs at other US universities and colleges. Future research should confirm the generalizability of the study’s findings by collecting data from fans of other athletic departments.

Originality/value

It is important to understand the impact of CSR activities on online donor intentions because marketing these activities could serve as an effective fundraising tool for athletic departments. The findings from this study inform athletic administrators of factors they might consider when promoting CSR initiatives through online media to encourage fans’ donations.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Eduardo Soares Batista, Alexandro Reis, Filipe Bortolini, Marcelo Alves de Souza, Miriam Borchardt and Giancarlo Medeiros Pereira

The purpose of this paper is to examine how corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives add value to Brazilian companies and how these companies perceive the impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives add value to Brazilian companies and how these companies perceive the impact of CSR initiatives on their customers, employees, and society.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple case study was conducted on 17 Brazilian companies, from diverse industries, that started their CSR initiatives between 1984 and 2011.

Findings

It is possible to identify ten companies with CSR initiatives disconnected from business strategy. In such cases, CSR started as an altruistic contribution to the local community. Actions have been limited to the employees and have demanded resources without perceived value for stakeholders. In seven companies, CSR initiatives are linked to the business strategy. In these cases, CSR initiatives add value to the companies promoting companies’ or brands’ reputation. It is observed to provide better working environment through employees’ motivation and their involvement in CSR initiatives. This value is perceived for the customers, employees, and for the society. However, to reinforce this perception, interested stakeholders should be informed about CSR initiatives and their contribution to the society.

Originality/value

This research attempts to analyze the CSR initiatives of the companies in emerging countries and to understand how CSR could add value to these companies and how this value is perceived. It also aims to understand how these initiatives have been organized and could support the altruistic efforts with effective results to the companies and to the society.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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