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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Stephanie Best, Arja Koski, Lynne Walsh and Päivi Vuokila-Oikkonen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of innovative teaching methods and share a four-step model, to promote the use of co-production in mental health practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach highlights three real-life examples of day to day experiences in mental health nurse education with innovative approaches to sharing and developing co-production skills and attitudes in mental health student nurses.

Findings

The case studies highlight three settings where undergraduate mental health nurses experience co-production through a world café event and dialogical community development. Common themes include setting the environment, developing a common aim and relationship building.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this paper is that only three case studies are provided, further examples would provide a greater pool of exemplars for others to draw on. However, by focusing upon student nurse education in learning environment, these examples are transferable to other settings.

Practical implications

The practical applications are summarised in a four-step model that can help develop co-productive teaching methods; enable educators to set the climate and generate an understanding of co-production that empowers students and service users.

Social implications

The emphasis and relevance of promoting co-productive working habits early on in nurses’ mental health nursing careers will enable them to raise awareness of future social implications for a range of client groups.

Originality/value

This paper focuses upon mental health student nurses whilst providing an innovative model to facilitate co-production experiences applicable in a range of settings.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2016

Pasi Koski

Compared with the history of many other countries, sport has had an exceptional role in the Finnish transformation from a young to a mature nation. Finland has a relatively long…

Abstract

Compared with the history of many other countries, sport has had an exceptional role in the Finnish transformation from a young to a mature nation. Finland has a relatively long tradition in the sociology of sport. The interest has been focused on a wide range of physical activities. At the same time, the parent discipline of sociology has been a “mother” science in the field; as such the more representative term in Finland for this area is the “social science of sport and physical activity.” Finnish sociology of sport is strongly concentrated in Jyväskylä and most of the scholars in the field have been educated at the University of Jyväskylä. Recently the research in the field has spread to other universities and new perspectives have enriched the research. The critical mass of Finnish sociology of sport is not very big. Approximately 400 students have graduated in the field during its history and approximately 60 have worked in the field as professional researchers. Most of the publications in the field are for a domestic audience. The group of internationally active scholars is relative small. The variety of research themes is nevertheless wide. However, interest has continued in a few of them, and has focused on several researchers. In this respect, the most central themes have included changes in sports culture, socialization into sport and physical activities, gender and physical activities, the social significance of sport and physical activity, and organized sport movements.

Details

Sociology of Sport: A Global Subdiscipline in Review
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-050-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Marja-Leena Rönkkö and Jaana Lepistö

The aim of this paper is to reveal and investigate differences in how Finnish student teachers understand entrepreneurship education and how critical they are of it. The research…

1396

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to reveal and investigate differences in how Finnish student teachers understand entrepreneurship education and how critical they are of it. The research question is: what kind of critical understanding do student teachers reveal in their conception of entrepreneurship education?

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach termed content analysis was used to investigate student teacher’s conceptions. The data were collected from essays written by 257 student teachers at the University of Turku’s, Rauma teacher education department during 2010-2012.

Findings

The conception of entrepreneurship education is, in many ways, related to how much one already knows about entrepreneurship education or how one reacts to it. It seems that most student teachers’ conceptions of entrepreneurship are positive, but even those in favour of it, in principle, do not necessarily want to see entrepreneurship education included in the basic education curriculum. Nevertheless, they think that enterprising pedagogy is useful and that the way of thinking about teaching is inspiring. They also feel that both teacher education and basic education benefit from some kind of entrepreneurship component, but do not take entrepreneurship education for granted. On the basis of this study, it is proposed that teacher education should incorporate more teaching that supports critical thinking in all study modules.

Originality/value

The findings of this study illustrate that there is much more to do in teacher education and its curricula. Teaching situations and learning situations are always social situations and both learners and teachers have a vital role to play.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2020

Anu Järvensivu

Multiple jobholders’ workplace learning is an under-researched theme, although it offers possibilities to add knowledge of learning at several workplaces at a time. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Multiple jobholders’ workplace learning is an under-researched theme, although it offers possibilities to add knowledge of learning at several workplaces at a time. The purpose of this study is to explore the career development and workplace learning of Finnish multiple jobholders with university degree.

Design/methodology/approach

The qualitative extreme case study of “elite multiple jobholders” was based on 45 in-depth interviews, which were analysed by abductive content analysis using the chaos theory of careers (CTC).

Findings

This study showed that elite multiple jobholders were attracted by meaningful jobs, which were significant, had broader purposes or offered possibilities for self-realization and self-development, whereas they criticized paid work organizations. They tried to anticipate the future working life and labour markets and adjusted their careers to them by educating and by choosing jobs with learning possibilities. However, they saw themselves as constructers of the future, which left them at vulnerable position concerning the institutional setting. They organized their work flexibly with different contracts and their professional identities were networked.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in Finns with university degree. Future research should inspect multiple jobholders with lower degree educations, in different contexts and with other methodologies.

Originality/value

This study gives an example of applying CTC as a holistic framework to study how individual careers emerge contextually and how they are recursively connected to work organization and working life changes. Possibilities to understand fractals are offered.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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