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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Annika Andersson and Berner Lindström

This study aims to investigate how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises with police, ambulance and rescue services, and how boundary awareness is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how boundary work is carried out at the incident site during exercises with police, ambulance and rescue services, and how boundary awareness is developed based on this boundary work. Collaboration in emergency work is challenging on many levels. The unforeseen and temporary nature of incidents presents basic challenges. Another important challenge is boundaries between specialised and autonomous emergency service organisations. Knowledge on how exercises are performed to increase the individuals' and organisations' preparedness for future joint-response work is relatively limited.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirically, full-scale exercises involving police, ambulance and rescue services and with repetition of practical scenarios and joint-reflection seminars are studied. Interview data with 26 exercise participants were analysed using thematic analysis. The analytic focus is on how boundaries are identified, negotiated and managed in the participants’ work.

Findings

Much of the work in the exercises was performed within distinct areas of expertise, in accordance with concrete routines, skills and responsibilities. Boundary work was often organised in the form of distribution of labour or creating chains of actions. The exercises shed light on challenges related to other aspects of emergency response, such as a lack of resources, diverging primary responsibilities, time-criticality and hazardous environments. The design allowed participants to explicate boundaries, to test and discuss alternative solutions and to visualise the effects of different solutions, as the scenarios were repeated.

Originality/value

The study found that the boundaries that were identified were often of institutional character, and were also related to the specific scenarios and to the actions taken in the activities. By integrating real-life experiences of collaborative work in the exercise, the exercise gained a certain meaning that was essential for the participants to develop boundary awareness.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Tomas Andersson, Annika Andersson Ceder and Ilia Bider

The growth of the Internet and information technology often leads to more customer requests and can mean that a small staff must cope with a large number of business processes…

1042

Abstract

The growth of the Internet and information technology often leads to more customer requests and can mean that a small staff must cope with a large number of business processes. Effective management under these circumstances requires a computer system able to support these business processes. Such a system cannot be developed without modeling business processes, which requires a great deal of “in‐house” information from the people who participate in business processes – information on routines, rules, etc. In general, it is not enough to get the process participants to describe their actions – they should first achieve a deeper understanding of the processes themselves (in terms of goals, activities, etc). A technique called state flow (SF) has been developed to help process participants understand processes. The paper gives an overview of the application of the SF technique in building models of two business processes: a decision‐making process; and a process of recruiting new members (for a non‐profit association).

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Annika Andersson and Timothy L. Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to describe the sequential nature that enterprise resource planning (ERP) projects tend to take and to describe how the buyer typically behaves…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the sequential nature that enterprise resource planning (ERP) projects tend to take and to describe how the buyer typically behaves concerning the need for control and learning in and in‐between ERP projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Results come from an in‐depth case study of sequential ERP projects. The respondents were a major Swedish retailer and a supplier who undertook upgrading of an ERP system with six separate and sequential projects. The research was framed by independent pre‐ and post‐interviews in three buyer companies' from different areas of business.

Findings

Results suggest that success is associated with mutual learning between supplier and buyer organizations that lead to reasonably amicable working relationships. Control considerations run through these projects and conflicts appear minimal in the sequential treatment. Insightful interpretation comes not only from empirical reflection on interactions in an in‐depth case study, but also from concepts available in decision making and project marketing as well.

Research limitations/implications

Case studies present in‐depth understanding but have generalization limitations. Also the case study was accomplished in Sweden and thus knowledge about behaviour in other countries and cultures is needed.

Practical implications

Managers investing in relationships and learning in an initial project probably suffer in terms of satisfaction and profitability at that stage but could accomplish more effective, satisfying and profitable situations over time. In particular, appreciation of the nature of the sequential project development, mutual control, delivery and learning in these projects could be useful in understanding the buyer behaviour in ERP projects.

Originality/value

Learning is important in projects but how do the buyers behave? A description of the sequential nature of ERP projects and the learning process both within the buyer's company and within the supplier's company is established. Tables are created that describe how the gap in the mutual learning process decreases in‐between projects in business‐to‐business projects.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Annika Andersson, Eric D. Carlstrom, Bengt Ahgren and Johan M. Berlin

– The purpose of this paper is to identify what is practiced during collaboration exercises and possible facilitators for inter-organisational collaboration.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify what is practiced during collaboration exercises and possible facilitators for inter-organisational collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with 23 participants from four collaboration exercises in Sweden were carried out during autumn 2011. Interview data were subjected to qualitative content analysis.

Findings

Findings indicate that the exercises tend to focus on intra-organisational routines and skills, rather than developing collaboration capacities. What the participants practiced depended on roles and order of arrival at the exercise. Exercises contributed to practicing leadership roles, which was considered essential since crises are unpredictable and require inter-organisational decision making.

Originality/value

The results of this study indicate that the ability to identify boundary objects, such as injured/patients, was found to be important in order for collaboration to occur. Furthermore, lessons learned from exercises could benefit from inter-organisational evaluation. By introducing and reinforcing certain elements and distinct aims of the exercise, the proactive function of collaboration exercises can be clarified.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Annika Andersson

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze communication patterns and bridging activities to be able to describe communication barriers in an interorganizational…

5044

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore and analyze communication patterns and bridging activities to be able to describe communication barriers in an interorganizational enterprise resource planning (ERP) project and some ways to overcome those.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical arena was an interorganizational ERP-project, which implemented an On-Premise ERP-system. The goal for the team, assembled from both the buyer and supplier, was to implement an ERP-system, with a fixed price calculated from the expected resources and time needed, half a year. Participant observations, complementary interviews and documentation studies were accomplished, to be able to find and describe communication barriers for organizational development.

Findings

Communication barriers were found, such as technnological concerns, micro-level discussions, limited bridging activities and openness to change.

Research limitations/implications

The present study, concerning one single, interorganizational ERP-project provides a starting point for further research concerning communication barriers in ERP-projects. Further research could look at the implications communication barriers could have for the buyer and supplier organization in a long term.

Practical implications

In managerial implications, some ways to overcome those barriers are discussed.

Originality/value

Communication barriers found, and their impact on knowledge development within interorganizational ERP-projects, is described. The paper offers a starting point for future research concerning communication barriers. Results could be used of managers to understand communication barriers and their implications for knowledge development and organizational change.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

Mathias Hatakka, Annika Andersson and Åke Grönlund

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate effects of students’ 1:1 laptop use from a capability perspective by investigating increases and decreases of students’ opportunities and…

2670

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate effects of students’ 1:1 laptop use from a capability perspective by investigating increases and decreases of students’ opportunities and choices. The paper investigates changes that have taken place and how these changes enable or restrict students to do and be what they desire.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper undertakes an interpretive case study based on group interviews and questionnaires. Sen's capability approach is used as theoretical framework and has informed the data collection and the analysis.

Findings

1:1 laptops in schools have provided students with new opportunities and choices, but also restricted others. An evident opportunity is the equalization of access to computers. Other opportunities relate to schoolwork efficiency and increased access to information. Gains also include the use of different media for overcoming disabilities or to fit individual learning styles. Regarding students’ well‐being, a “fun” learning environment is mentioned. However, the “fun” is often about playing games or using social media – something which diverts the students’ attention from the learning. Students also find that they are less social, too computer dependent, and that they miss using pen and paper. Additionally, health issues such as back problems and headaches are reported, as well as an increased risk of being robbed.

Originality/value

Most research on 1:1 laptops in education focuses on easily quantifiable measures and reports from a teacher perspective. The paper takes a broader approach and investigates the impact 1:1 laptops have on students’ well‐being and agency.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Derek H.T. Walker

354

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Derek H.T. Walker

187

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Paresh Wankhade and Peter Murphy and Kirsten Greenhalgh

149

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2018

Annika Maria Margareta Nordin, Boel Andersson Gäre and Ann-Christine Andersson

The purpose of this paper is to examine how external change agents (ECAs) engaged to disseminate a national quality register (NQR) called Senior alert nationwide in the Swedish…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how external change agents (ECAs) engaged to disseminate a national quality register (NQR) called Senior alert nationwide in the Swedish health care and elderly care sectors interpret their work. To study this, sensemaking theories are used.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative inductive interview study including eight ECAs. To analyze the data, a thematic analysis is carried out.

Findings

Well-disseminated NQRs support health care organizations’ possibility to work with quality improvement and to improve care for patient groups. NQRs function as artifacts that can influence how health care professionals make sense of their work. In this paper, a typology depicting how the ECAs make sense of their dissemination work has been developed. The ECAs are engaged in prospective sensemaking. They describe their work as being about creating future good results, both for patients and affiliated organizations, and they can balance different quality aspects.

Originality/value

The number of NQRs increased markedly in Sweden and elsewhere, but there are few reports on how health care professionals working with the registers interpret their work. The use of ECAs to disseminate NQRs is a novel approach. This paper describes how the ECAs are engaged in prospective sensemaking – an under-researched perspective of the sensemaking theory.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

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