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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Anis Maaloul, Walid Ben Amar and Daniel Zeghal

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between voluntary disclosure of intangibles and financial analysts’ earnings forecasts properties.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between voluntary disclosure of intangibles and financial analysts’ earnings forecasts properties.

Design/methodology/approach

Disclosures about intangible assets were hand-collected through content analysis of annual reports of a sample of US non-financial firms, while analysts’ earnings forecasts properties were collected from Bloomberg Professional database. The authors relied on correlation and multivariate regression analyses to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that increased intangible disclosures affect analysts’ earnings forecasts accuracy, dispersion, and favourable consensus recommendations. However, this effect varies according to the nature of intangible assets.

Practical implications

The results may be of interest to different market participants such as corporate managers, financial analysts, and standards setting bodies that recently published guidelines on voluntary disclosure of intangibles.

Originality/value

This study develops a new comprehensive index to measure the content of narrative disclosures about a large number of intangibles, such as human, structural, and relational assets. The findings contribute to the current debate on the value-relevance of narrative disclosures on intangibles to investors and financial analysts.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Anis Maaloul, Raïda Chakroun and Sabrine Yahyaoui

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of companies’ political connections (PCs) on their financial and stock performance, as well as on their market values.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of companies’ political connections (PCs) on their financial and stock performance, as well as on their market values.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of non-financial companies listed on the Tunis Stock Exchange (TSE) between 2012 and 2014 was used. The accounting and financial data of these companies were obtained from their financial statements, whereas data on PCs of their officers and directors were collected manually from various sources. Correlation and multivariate regression analyses were performed to test the hypothesis of this research.

Findings

The results showed that PCs improve companies’ performance and value. These results could be explained, on the one hand, by the benefits and favors that companies can get from their political ties and, on the other hand, by investors’ tendency to invest in politically connected companies to benefit from these advantages.

Research limitations/implications

The limited number of non-financial companies listed on the TSE is a limit for this research.

Practical implications

The results show that investment in companies which are politically inter-connected may be beneficial for investors, and especially for small minority shareholders.

Social implications

The results confirm that political links are essential for business success in emerging economies, such as Tunisia. However, the positive link between politics and business might highlight the issue of corruption after the revolution.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the effect of PCs on the performance and value of Tunisian companies after the 2011 revolution.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2019

Yosra Fourati Makni, Anis Maaloul and Rabeb Dabbebi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of tax-haven use of publicly listed Canadian firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the determinants of tax-haven use of publicly listed Canadian firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on alternative measures of tax havens (TH) and referring to a sample of 235 Canadian firms over the period of 2014–2015, probit-regression analyses are used to examine the determinants of tax-haven use.

Findings

The authors provide evidence that multinationality, intangible assets, thin capitalization, withholding taxes, equity-based management remuneration and tax fees paid to auditing firms are positively associated with TH use. Furthermore, the authors show that the variable relating to R&D intensity is positively associated with TH use. The authors also document that strong corporate-governance structures are negatively associated with TH use.

Research limitations/implications

This study is only limited to Canadian firms, so the results may not be generalizable to other countries.

Practical implications

The results may assist tax watchdogs in their efforts to understand the tax behavior held by Canadian firms. They may also be interesting for tax authorities in planning enforcement activities.

Originality/value

This study uses a sample from publicly listed financial and non-financial firms. It also uses various lists of TH published by various competent sources (IMF, 2000, 2007; TJN, 2005; OECD, 2012). The findings corroborate the recent media attention about the extensive use of TH by Canadian firms.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Anis Maaloul and Daniel Zéghal

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between financial statement informativeness (FSI) and intellectual capital disclosure (ICD).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between financial statement informativeness (FSI) and intellectual capital disclosure (ICD).

Design/methodology/approach

While FSI was measured as the explanatory power of financial information in explaining market value, ICD was collected through content analysis of annual reports. A sample of 126 US companies, divided into two groups – high-tech and low-tech companies – were used in this study. Empirical analysis was carried out using the Poisson regression method.

Findings

The results show a negative (substitutive) relationship between FSI and ICD, especially in high-tech companies. This indicates that companies with low FSI disclose more information about their IC in annual reports.

Practical implications

This study confirms the role of voluntary ICD as a solution towards mitigating the problem of the distortion of financial information due to the lack of accounting recognition of IC as an asset in the financial statements.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to analyse the relationship between FSI and ICD. Therefore, it serves as feedback to the regulators and standard-setters that recently published recommendations on voluntarily disclosing IC.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2010

Daniel Zéghal and Anis Maaloul

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of value added (VA) as an indicator of intellectual capital (IC), and its impact on the firm's economic, financial and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the role of value added (VA) as an indicator of intellectual capital (IC), and its impact on the firm's economic, financial and stock market performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The value added intellectual coefficient (VAIC™) method is used on 300 UK companies divided into three groups of industries: high‐tech, traditional and services. Data require to calculate VAIC™ method are obtained from the “Value Added Scoreboard” provided by the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). Empirical analysis is conducted using correlation and linear multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results show that companies' IC has a positive impact on economic and financial performance. However, the association between IC and stock market performance is only significant for high‐tech industries. The results also indicate that capital employed remains a major determinant of financial and stock market performance although it has a negative impact on economic performance.

Practical implications

The VAIC™ method could be an important tool for many decision makers to integrate IC in their decision process.

Originality/value

This is the first research which has used the data on VA recently calculated and published by the UK DTI in the “Value Added Scoreboard”. This paper constitutes therefore a kind of validation of the ministry data.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2012

Abstract

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Ahmed Aboud and Ahmed Diab

This study aims to examine the combined impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) ratings on the market and financial performance of Egyptian companies during…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the combined impact of environmental, social and governance (ESG) ratings on the market and financial performance of Egyptian companies during the period from 2007 to 2016 and, thereby, determines the influence of the recent political revolutions –that broke out in the MENA region in early 2011 – on the association between ESG practices and corporate performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The present work uses data from the S&P/EGX ESG index, which is the first of its kind in the MENA region. The ESG index is designed to increase the profile of companies listed on the Egyptian Exchange and is expected to boost the level and quality of ESG practices in the Egyptian context. The sample includes the 100 most active Egyptian companies in the Egyptian Stock Exchange as measured by the EGX 100 index in the financial year that ended in 2016. The sample begins in 2007, concurrent with the start of the ESG index, and ends in 2016. The period from 2007 to 2010 represents the pre-revolution period, and the period from 2012 to 2016 is the post-revolution period.

Findings

Firms with high ESG ratings are found to enjoy a better financial and market performance. The authors found some evidence that the influence of ESG ratings on financial performance is more obvious after the revolutions than before the revolutions.

Practical implications

This study provides insights regarding the impact of political events on the market in the Middle East region. Despite its increasing economic and political importance, this region still suffers from inadequate attention in the literature. The present work investigates the variances that evolved out of the events that started in early 2011 and the implications of these events on the market. The results of this study have implications for regulators and investors in the Egyptian stock market. The authors believe that the relatively new S&P/EGX ESG index provides a way to enhance ESG ratings in Egypt.

Social implications

The results of the present study provide insights for policymakers regarding the usefulness of the sustainability indices.

Originality/value

The present results contribute to the growing literature on the economic consequences of ESG ratings, especially in relation to a context characterized by intense political/revolutionary changes. In particular, this study contributes to the few works that have addressed the economic implications of ESG ratings in emerging markets.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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