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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2010

Paulo Maçãs Nunes, Zélia Serrasqueiro, Luis Mendes and Tiago Neves Sequeira

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the relationship between growth and research and development (R&D) intensity is of a different nature in the context of low…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine if the relationship between growth and research and development (R&D) intensity is of a different nature in the context of low‐ and high‐tech Portuguese service small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The System Analysis of Iberian Balance Sheets database is used. Based on the European Union's recommendation, L124/36 (2003/261/CE), the authors select 764 low‐tech and 139 high‐tech Portuguese service SMEs for the period 1999‐2006. As method of analysis, panel data are used.

Findings

A negative relationship between growth and R&D intensity for low‐tech Portuguese service SMEs is identified, whatever the level of R&D intensity. For high‐tech Portuguese service SMEs, a quadratic U‐shaped relationship between growth and R&D intensity is identified. Moreover, the authors find that relationships between growth and determinants are of a special nature in the context of high‐tech Portuguese service SMEs with high levels of R&D intensity.

Practical implications

It is recommended that as far as possible the managers/owners of low‐tech Portuguese service SMEs, and especially high‐tech ones with non‐high levels of R&D intensity, hire qualified human resources and make more continuous investment in R&D. The authors advise managers/owners of high‐tech Portuguese service SMEs with high levels of R&D intensity to establish stable relationships with creditors. Policy‐makers should increase financial support directed, above all, to innovative Portuguese service SMEs.

Originality/value

The paper is pioneering in presenting different relationships between growth and R&D intensity in the context of low‐ and high‐tech service SMEs.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Shubin Si, Josu Takala and Yang Liu

The purpose of this paper is to study the operational competitiveness and identify the development route of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies by comparing with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the operational competitiveness and identify the development route of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies by comparing with other similar international manufacturing companies of global manufacturing strategies database.

Design/methodology/approach

The preliminary analytical models for competitiveness analysis are used to analyze the operational competitiveness strategies in three different types of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies based on the weights of the multi‐criteria manufacturing strategies, which are calculated using analytic hierarchy process method. Benchmarking between case companies and leading companies of prospector, analyzer and defender groups is applied to evaluate the manufacturing strategies further.

Findings

As a result of the case studies, it is possible to understand operational competitiveness manufacturing strategies for the case companies, to show one development route for Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies to be competitive in their markets.

Practical implications

Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies have their own operational strategies in different development phase. The different weights of important factors such as quality, cost, time and flexibility make the case companies to have some advantages in prospector, analyzer and defender. The preliminary analytical models are effective for Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies to calculate their operational competitiveness under the influence of Chinese culture and macro‐control.

Originality/value

Benchmarking of operational competitiveness is presented to evaluate the manufacturing strategies in this paper. One development route of Chinese high‐tech manufacturing companies, which is under the influence of Chinese culture and macro‐control, is promoted.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Sangeet Dhanani, Nicholas O’Shaughnessy and Eric Louw

Describes an empirical study which aimed to compare the marketing practices used by high‐tech and low‐tech companies in the UK, and to attempt to explain any significant…

Abstract

Describes an empirical study which aimed to compare the marketing practices used by high‐tech and low‐tech companies in the UK, and to attempt to explain any significant differences. Concludes that there is increasing awareness of the salience of marketing by UK high technology companies, though they are still not as market oriented as low‐tech ones. Suggests that broadly speaking results replicate earlier findings in US high technology firms, with the critical difference that the British companies rate both the possession of the latest technology and price competition less seriously than the American organizations.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Anis Maaloul and Daniel Zéghal

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between financial statement informativeness (FSI) and intellectual capital disclosure (ICD).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the relationship between financial statement informativeness (FSI) and intellectual capital disclosure (ICD).

Design/methodology/approach

While FSI was measured as the explanatory power of financial information in explaining market value, ICD was collected through content analysis of annual reports. A sample of 126 US companies, divided into two groups – high-tech and low-tech companies – were used in this study. Empirical analysis was carried out using the Poisson regression method.

Findings

The results show a negative (substitutive) relationship between FSI and ICD, especially in high-tech companies. This indicates that companies with low FSI disclose more information about their IC in annual reports.

Practical implications

This study confirms the role of voluntary ICD as a solution towards mitigating the problem of the distortion of financial information due to the lack of accounting recognition of IC as an asset in the financial statements.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study to analyse the relationship between FSI and ICD. Therefore, it serves as feedback to the regulators and standard-setters that recently published recommendations on voluntarily disclosing IC.

Details

Journal of Financial Reporting and Accounting, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1985-2517

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2019

Nader Seyyedamiri and Ladan Tajrobehkar

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of social content marketing in social media on the effectiveness of the new product development process of high-tech

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of social content marketing in social media on the effectiveness of the new product development process of high-tech companies with regard to the e-trust as a mediator between content and effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

For this study, a descriptive research method has been adopted. Data were collected through a questionnaire. In total, 430 questionnaires were distributed among professionals and managers working in R&D, marketing, sales and strategic departments of firms affiliated with ICT Guild Organization in September 2017. Of this number, 384 complete questionnaires were included in the study. Data were analyzed using structural equation method by Smart PLS software.

Findings

Findings show that although social content marketing and e-trust influenced the effectiveness of the product development process, e-trust did not play a mediating role in the relationship between social content marketing and effectiveness of product development process in high-tech companies.

Practical implications

High-tech companies, drawing on the results of this research, can utilize the component of social content marketing in social and mobile media and content publication through e-commerce, social and mobile media and m-commerce while analyzing user-generated content to identify user demands and achieve the proper idea generation. At the time of commercializing, by educating and informing customers, they mitigate fears and risks. This will lead to increasing the effectiveness of the product development process, market share and achieving revenue goals.

Originality/value

This study investigates the social content marketing role in product development process in high-tech companies and tests the model in the context of the Tehran IT industries. The result of this study provides a reference for managers of high-tech companies and helps them lower the failure rate of product development.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2015

Severine LeLoarne and Adnane Maalaoui

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how entrepreneurs anticipate and change their company’s business process management after developing a radical innovation. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how entrepreneurs anticipate and change their company’s business process management after developing a radical innovation. The paper is based on a critical approach to business process modelling (BPM) that posits that – in spite of all the claims, guides and tools that companies employ to help them modelise their processes – business processes are developed and improved (or at least changed) by individuals who negotiate, anticipate and compromise to make these changes occur. Thus, BPM is more a matter of “bricolage” (Levi-Strauss) than an established and defined plan. Based on this position, the paper analyses how a business process model emerges in the early phases of a high-tech new venture when the entrepreneur lacks a valid template to form a conceptual representation of the firm’s business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt a perspective based on the concept of bricolage. By analysing and comparing the discourse of 40 entrepreneurs – involved in an activity based on a radical innovation and 20 involved in an activity based on a more incremental concept – the authors are able to answer the two research questions.

Findings

Entrepreneurs who develop a new activity based on any radical or incremental innovation generally base the BPM of their company and the evolution of this process on existing models. However, BPM generally differs based on the nature of the innovation. Thus, entrepreneurs who develop a new activity based on a radical innovation do not design a single BPM for their company but a portfolio of BPMs. The process by which such entrepreneurs develop such a portfolio is mainly conducted in a step-by-step and iterative approach that utilises “whatever is at hand” (Levi-Strauss, 1966).

Originality/value

First, this study extends existing methods for and approaches to considering BPM. Second, this research partly answers the call for integration among different theoretical backgrounds and approaches that consider BPM.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Abstract

Details

Silicon Valley North
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08044-457-4

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2020

Jian Xu and Jingsuo Li

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of intellectual capital (IC) and its components (human, structural and relational capitals) on the performance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of intellectual capital (IC) and its components (human, structural and relational capitals) on the performance of manufacturing listed companies in China. This paper also investigates the impacts of company ownership, industry attributes and region on the IC-performance relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the data of 953 manufacturing companies listed on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges over the period 2012–2016. The modified value-added intellectual coefficient (MVAIC) model is applied to measure IC efficiency. Finally, multiple regression analysis is employed to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

This study reveals that IC can enhance firm performance in China's manufacturing sector. Overall, earnings are affected by physical capital, human capital (HC) and structural capital (SC), and profitability and productivity are influenced by physical capital, HC, SC and relational capital. Physical capital is the most influential contributor to firm performance. In addition, state-owned enterprises have a greater impact of IC on firm performance than private-owned enterprises; high-tech manufacturing companies have higher IC performance than non-high-tech manufacturing companies; manufacturing companies in China's eastern region have higher IC performance than the counterparts in central and western regions.

Practical implications

The findings may help managers, stakeholders and policymakers in developing countries to effectively and efficiently manage their IC resources.

Originality/value

This is the first study to evaluate IC and its relationship with firm performance among Chinese manufacturing listed companies using the MVAIC model.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Mei‐Ying Wu, Yung‐Chien Weng and I‐Chiao Huang

The purpose of this paper is to use high‐tech companies in Taiwan as research subjects to verify the fit of the commitment‐trust theory and explore the supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use high‐tech companies in Taiwan as research subjects to verify the fit of the commitment‐trust theory and explore the supply chain relationships among research variables.

Design/methodology/approach

The key mediating variables model (KMV) proposed by Morgan and Hunt is applied to construct the research structure, hypotheses, and questionnaire. The research hypotheses are validated through structural equation modelling and confirmatory factor analysis.

Findings

Research results show that for two parties of an exchange relationship, higher levels of trust can lead to better interactions and trust is an important factor affecting their supply chain partnerships. It helps increase interests of both parties, facilitate constant co‐operation and communication, and reduce uncertainties. Higher levels of commitment can also help increase value benefits, reduce a partner's propensity to leave, and enhance supply chain co‐operation efficiency.

Originality/value

Empirical results indicate that relationship marketing is a strategy that promotes trust and commitment of partners in high‐tech industries. While information sharing and communication can increase partners' intention of long‐term co‐operation, functional conflicts can facilitate positive interactions and reduce uncertainties. Through relationship marketing, high‐tech companies can create win‐win strategic alliances to develop their competitive advantages in the market.

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2021

Christina Öberg

This paper describes and discusses company spin-ins and spin-outs as a means to understand company growth in a dynamic context. The following question is asked: How can…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper describes and discusses company spin-ins and spin-outs as a means to understand company growth in a dynamic context. The following question is asked: How can growth be understood in spin-ins and spin-outs of innovative firms? The paper suggests return on capabilities as a measure to understand growth in an open innovation context.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical part of the paper consists of a single case study. Data was captured through interviews and secondary data sources.

Findings

The paper points to that resources alone do not explain strategic decisions by a company and how spin-ins and spin-outs result from the need for capabilities, changes in business foci and temporary solutions to deal with overcapacities or lack of alternatives.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to research by discussing contemporary issues in strategy and innovation and relating them to the resource-based view and the growth of the firm. Spin-outs, and acquisitions and divestitures as interlinked events have rarely been focused on in the literature, while they remain frequent phenomena in practice.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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