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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1964

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a…

Abstract

CANADA, until the last generation or two, has been basically a pioneer country but two world wars have changed all this and the economy has moved from an agricultural to a manufacturing community able to provide a standard of living second to that of the United States. (At the present time only 10.8 per cent of Canadians live on farms according to the 1961 census.) Natural resources, such as timber, wheat and mining, continue to play, however, an important role in the life of the nation. As in most developing and pioneer countries, learning has had to assume a secondary role compared with other enterprises and activities. This is gradually beginning to change as more people continue in school and the percentage of individuals attending university increases. Established organizations, like the National Film Board and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, catering to mass culture, have been strengthened and enlarged and new establishments, like the Canada Council and the Stratford Shakespearean Festival, of narrower function and appeal, have been set up. The Library movement, not the least of learning agencies, is gaining strength every day. In this paper some of the interesting new developments of the last ten years in the latter field will be discussed. Of necessity, much is abbreviated; a lot is ignored. Data selected has been based on the most recent sources; hence the variety in dates.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Andrew Turnbull and Jane Macleod

This paper considers those high growth companies who do not appear to consult official support bodies – in particular, Grampian Enterprise Ltd. The challenge of finding these…

211

Abstract

This paper considers those high growth companies who do not appear to consult official support bodies – in particular, Grampian Enterprise Ltd. The challenge of finding these businesses has been likened to looking for “diamonds in the sand”. Both general and specific recommendations are drawn that would help in the locating and motivating of these SMEs to seek official help.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Sharon Barbour and Andrew Turnbull

This paper examines the integration of entrepreneurial thinking and the elements of marketing strategy in attracting visitors to Grampian region’s castles, focusing specifically…

Abstract

This paper examines the integration of entrepreneurial thinking and the elements of marketing strategy in attracting visitors to Grampian region’s castles, focusing specifically on the current tourist initiative of the “Castle Trail”. Firstly, the nature of a heritage tourism resource is highlighted. Secondly, the role of entrepreneurship in not for profit organisations is considered. Lastly, the paper explores the need to include entrepreneurial activities in the development of a marketing plan for maximising the potential of the north‐east’s heritage tourism resources. It is demonstrated that this approach will allow for the creation of a fundamentally distinctive image that will contribute to the overall success of the initiative. The central hypothesis is that the marketing of Grampian region’s prime heritage asset is at present inadequate and new initiatives are required to link marketing principles with entrepreneurial practice. This is supported by primary research findings, where it is demonstrated that a rethinking of the current strategy is much needed. The primary research consists of both interviews and questionnaires. The findings of this research are then combined with the findings of the secondary research, the literature review, and together they provide the framework for a number of recommendations. These include the need to improve road signposting, to extend opening times, and make greater use of sales promotion. A more creative approach can also allow for greater exploitation of new opportunities, particularly in the context of the augmented product. The final conclusion is that there is significant public interest and support for promoting the region’s castles as a major tourist asset, but that at present the potential to promote the region is being clearly under utilised.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2008

David Mackmin

The purpose of this paper is to review the historic evolution of dual rate valuation practice in the UK from the nineteenth century to the present time.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the historic evolution of dual rate valuation practice in the UK from the nineteenth century to the present time.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a review of published books, articles and letters dating from 1852.

Findings

The study establishes the fact that single rate was the only method in use in the nineteenth century and notes the overlap of two methodologies and beliefs in the first half of the twentieth century. It confirms that by the late 1930s dual rate had replaced single rate and an “establishment opinion” on the essential need to value leaseholds dual rate on the basis of a set of commandments had emerged without any apparent disagreement. This position, with some debated refinements for the effect of tax and treatment of variable profit rents, is shown to continue through the twentieth century and is reaffirmed in standard textbook teaching at the start of the twenty‐first century. The review touches on the criticisms noted by academics in the latter part of twentieth century. It identifies as a key issue the continuing persistent misconception amongst UK valuers that there is a reinvestment assumption in the present value of £1 per annum.

Originality/value

Dual rate principles are shown in the paper to be untenable and the profession is advised to remove the method from future training of valuers and to cease to make any use of the method in the valuation of leasehold investments.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 October 2007

Tony Bovaird

In December 1999, the UK Civil Service Management Board in Whitehall agreed upon a reform program focusing on six themes, all connected with improved managerial processes internal…

Abstract

In December 1999, the UK Civil Service Management Board in Whitehall agreed upon a reform program focusing on six themes, all connected with improved managerial processes internal to the civil service and intended to complement the more externally oriented Modernising Government agenda set out in a white paper earlier that year. The purpose was to achieve major changes in the way in which the civil service was run – “step change” rather than continuous improvement. In May 2002, the Cabinet Office commissioned a research project to provide an evaluation of the Civil Service Reform program through four case studies. This chapter draws upon the findings of that study to discuss the extent to which cultural differences affected the outcomes of this ambitious reform program. In addition, it draws upon a set of interviews in 2005 which updated the findings of the research. The chapter suggests that four very different types of culture had important impacts on the way in which the case study organizations went about the process of addressing the Cabinet Office reform program, namely national cultures which differed greatly between the case studies, although they were all UK-based organizations; organizational cultures which differed greatly within each of the case study organizations; occupational cultures which crossed the four case studies, but usually with significant differences in each context; and sectoral cultures which in several cases provided particular barriers to change. The chapter shows how these different dimensions of culture were interwoven in the change programs of the four cases and explores the extent to which their progress on the reform agenda was affected by their particular cultural mix. It suggests that some “cultural stances” within these overall cultures were more difficult to change than others, so that reforms had to be re-activated on several occasions and through a variety of mechanisms. Finally, the chapter illustrates how, in the case study organizations which were most successful, a deliberate strategy was adopted by top management of highlighting the clashing internal cultures, in order to challenge the traditional positions of internal and external stakeholders, in spite of the risks involved.

Details

Cultural Aspects of Public Management Reform
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1400-3

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Can Uslay, Richard D. Teach and Robert G. Schwartz

Globalization, and more recently the dot‐com era, has increased worldwide interest in new business development. As a result, having an international perspective on the study of…

Abstract

Globalization, and more recently the dot‐com era, has increased worldwide interest in new business development. As a result, having an international perspective on the study of entrepreneurship has become more important for researcher and practitioner alike. One aspect of this enhanced interest is a worldwide interest in student entrepreneurs. It is no surprise that differences in attitudes towards entrepreneurship have been considered a major factor as to why some economies are more entrepreneurial and vibrant than others. By exploring US, Turkish, and Spanish business students’ attitudes, interests, and related country cultural influences towards entrepreneurship, this research builds upon and serves to extend the understanding of such issues.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1964

IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a…

Abstract

IN The verdict of you all, Rupert Croft‐Cooke has some uncomplimentary things to say about novel readers as a class, which is at least an unusual look at his public by a practitioner whose income for many years was provided by those he denigrates.

Details

New Library World, vol. 65 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1945

OPTIMISM as to the outlook is shown by the report from Sheffield of a book‐moving day, or perhaps returning‐day would be a better phrase, which involved the return from safe…

Abstract

OPTIMISM as to the outlook is shown by the report from Sheffield of a book‐moving day, or perhaps returning‐day would be a better phrase, which involved the return from safe storage to the Central Library of 10,000 books, 5,000 manuscripts and plans, and 10 tons of newspaper files. This probably is the first record of a homeward pilgrimage for hundreds of thousands of volumes of books as well as artistic and other treasures from bomb‐proof concealment. It is, however, yet too early for the districts in southern England to undertake the risk involved in such return. The newspapers are wisely silent about the areas in which there is still risk, but they are quite inarticulate as to the nature of the risk and it is clear that it covers a large area. The recent mobilization of air defences at Edinburgh suggests too that the particular type of attack to which Great Britain is still subject may not be confined to the south of England—from the nature of the weapon there appears to be no reason why it should be. Nevertheless, the risk that we think Sheffield takes is a legitimate one. People have returned in large numbers to their own homes; they need libraries and within reasonable limits they should have them. Our best work cannot be done when the valuable part of our stock is in inaccessible places. This return of books will create in many towns a serious storage problem: we can point to libraries which distributed their stock and which through accessions, gifts from evacuated people and other sources of accession, have filled most of the space occupied by their ordinary stock. Most of us need new buildings and our priority for them must be low. The ingenuity of librarians will be severely taxed in this as in many other matters.

Details

New Library World, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Felicity Matthews

Since 1997, the Labour Government sought to respond to the dilemmas and consequences of the earlier New Public Management reforms, according to the two principles of joined‐up…

Abstract

Since 1997, the Labour Government sought to respond to the dilemmas and consequences of the earlier New Public Management reforms, according to the two principles of joined‐up government and public service delivery. A key aspect of its reform programme has been the public service agreement (PSA) framework, a target‐based performance regime that acts as a vehicle for the majority of spending and policy decisions across government and on the ground. Analysing its implementation and success, the article suggests that, in theory, the PSA regime provides an important example of steering at a distance as a form of political leadership, wherein the role of the centre is to provide the strategic framework for policy delivery. However, there are several structural constraints that have impeded the effectiveness of the framework, such as the pervading Whitehall departmental culture, and the tensions between top‐down performance management and devolved autonomy on the ground.

Details

International Journal of Leadership in Public Services, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-9886

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Jon Talbot

The purpose of the paper is to describe the development and operation of an innovative, work based, distance delivered foundation degree developed by the University of Chester and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to describe the development and operation of an innovative, work based, distance delivered foundation degree developed by the University of Chester and the British Civil Service. The paper is both a case study in its own right but also the basis for a further quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the development of the programme in the broader context of UK Civil service modernisation and the application of the University of Chester's established Work Based and Integrative Studies (WBIS) framework. Important features of the programme are described including academic content, learner support, assessment and management.

Findings

The paper concludes by identifying three areas for formal evaluation. These are: the implications of employer involvement in the design and management of the programme; the differential nature of the learner experience and the factors underlying performance and the impact of the programme in meeting employer goals.

Research limitations/implications

There are limitations in generalising from a particular case study. No formal research questions are posed in the paper or method suggested. Further work is necessary to develop a strategy for evaluation of the programme.

Practical implications

The conclusions are exploratory, awaiting formal evaluation.

Originality/value

The case study is of interest to educators engaged in flexible and distance work based learning. The issue of employer involvement in programme design, management and delivery is of considerable interest to those developing and delivering Foundation degrees and similar programmes. The issues in relation to the student experience are also of considerable interest to those engaged in workplace delivery. The organisational impact of the programme is of interest to employers and educators alike.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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