Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations: Volume 15

Cover of Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Subject:

Table of contents

(17 chapters)
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List of Contributors

Pages vii-viii
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Writing Guidelines

Pages xi-xiii
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Abstract

Accounting practitioners and educators agree that effective oral and written communication skills are essential to success in the accounting profession. Despite numerous initiatives to improve accounting majors’ communication skills, many students remain deficient in this area. Communication literature suggests that one factor rendering these initiatives ineffective is communication apprehension (CA). There is general agreement that accounting students around the globe have higher levels of CA than other majors. Therefore, accounting educators interested in improving students’ communication skills need to be aware of the dimensions and implications of CA. This chapter provides a review of the relevant literature on CA, with a focus on CA in accounting majors. It also presents intervention techniques for use in the classroom and makes suggestions for future research.

Abstract

This study investigates the determinants of students’ intention to major in accounting (IMA) in pre-recessionary, recessionary, and post-recessionary time periods. By examining four factors (perceived professional ethics (PE), job market consideration (JMC), social influence (SI), and self-efficacy (SE)) in accordance with the theory of planned behavior (TPB), we address two primary research questions. The first question concerns whether the four factors are related to students’ IMA before, during, and after the recession. The second deals with whether there is a shift in the relative importance of the factors between the pre-recessionary, recessionary, and post-recessionary periods. We use structural equation modeling and multigroup analysis of structural invariance to analyze these issues. The results show that all four factors have significant structural weights in each period, with the exception of perceived PE in the pre-recessionary period. In terms of students’ IMA over the three periods, perceived PE, JMC, and SI become factors of greater importance during the recessionary and post-recessionary periods, while SE decreases in relative importance.

Abstract

The AICPA strongly suggests that accounting educators constantly monitor existing course offerings for content and relevance. To assist in this goal, the AICPA provides a list of various “core competency” skills that are recommended for future accountants (AICPA, 2013a). We review some of these skills and discuss how we incorporate them into an accounting elective course at a private liberal arts institution. Using a series of modules specifically designed to address various core competencies, students are able to obtain both knowledge and skills that will be useful in their future accounting careers. Based on student perceptions collected at the beginning and end of the semester, the class was successful in augmenting competencies relating to aspects of research and communication.

Abstract

This chapter provides an innovative way to introduce a series of managerial assignments that will allow students to take an example of a real company that interests them and answer questions designated by the instructor. The assignments are individualized to let students choose their area of interest and apply accounting concepts. At the same time, the instructor formulates questions for students to answer based on the materials covered. This chapter also provides an implementation process and student feedback.

Abstract

This chapter reviews the need for accounting education change in selected countries to determine whether commonalities exist. Beginning with the need for accounting education change in the United States and the promotion and acknowledgment of the Accounting Education Change Commission (AECC) initiatives in that country, the chapter proceeds to examine the accounting education reforms in three selected English-speaking countries with developed accounting systems. I find that in these selected countries, the emphasis, like the United States, was also on the nurturing of generic skills as opposed to acquiring just technical knowledge. These countries were leaning toward implementation of changes based on the philosophy of the AECC initiatives, although some were initiated prior to the formation of AECC. Hence, for any accounting education change in developing countries, these initiatives are highly recommended as a basis for accounting curriculum development and pedagogical considerations.

Abstract

Accounting educators believe that integrating accounting with other business subjects benefits students by illustrating the connections between disciplines and enhancing their abilities to identify which functional skills can be used to solve business problems. There are many models that have been used to achieve integration, including teaching related subject matter in one course, team teaching in cohorts, and designing an entire curriculum around business cases. There are numerous problems in achieving successful integration, primary among them being the costs to faculty in time spent on development and preparation. Another factor hindering successful integration efforts is the scarcity of teaching materials. However, the AACSB and the Pathways Commission continue to emphasize the importance of integrated learning. Recommendations of the Pathways Report to establish a peer-reviewed, electronically stored library of innovative materials open to all accounting educators; and to identify a small number of accounting programs to conduct multiyear pilot programs involving innovation of accounting principles courses may be helpful in assisting more accounting programs to design more integrative programs in the future.

Abstract

This chapter reports on the pilot of an innovative approach to business education that was instituted at a small university in the United States. In the program, students were divided into three learning cohorts. Each group was encouraged to learn as a community while taking three integrated classes. Teams competed within their cohort and cohorts competed against other cohorts. Students took introductory managerial accounting, introductory computer information systems and introductory management in the first semester and financial management, operations management and an introductory marketing course in the second semester. The program was designed to bridge the gap between theory and practice by helping students gain a better appreciation of how business functions are integrated. After the first semester, an anonymous survey revealed some useful insights that could be incorporated to enhance such programs. The structure of the program, its benefits, limitations and insights from the survey are reported in this chapter.

Abstract

This chapter describes the development of a two-course sequence, which explicitly breaks down the silos between the accounting and finance disciplines. A descriptive narrative demonstrates how these courses integrate introductory courses in general business, managerial accounting, financial accounting and finance, and are taught freshman year. The courses are based around an 18-chapter Instructional Narrative about a fictitious company, Windspark, which evolves from a start-up service business in the wind turbine industry to a retailer of parts and then a manufacturer. Topics are introduced as the entrepreneurs in the Instructional Narrative require business knowledge. Individual faculty members teach an entire course, rather than teams comprised from different disciplines. A diagnostic quiz at the beginning of the second course tests students’ understanding and retention of material in the first course. The vast majority of students pass the diagnostic quiz on the first try. Despite its rigor and difficulty, the sequence has coincided with a significant uptick in students choosing to major in finance and accounting. This sequence demonstrates the feasibility and replicability of teaching a truly integrated introductory accounting and finance course sequence. Greater coordination and cooperation between disciplines is possible, with measurable benefits for students.

Cover of Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
DOI
10.1108/S1085-4622201415
Publication date
2014-07-08
Book series
Advances in Accounting Education
Series copyright holder
Emerald Publishing Limited
Book series ISSN
1085-4622