Mentorship-driven Talent Management

Cover of Mentorship-driven Talent Management

The Asian Experience

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Table of contents

(13 chapters)

Prelims

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Abstract

Research on mentorship has been dominated by the West and little is known about the cultural variations of the mentoring phenomenon in Asian countries. A richer understanding of the cultural context that is more attuned to mentoring experience in Asia can help to improve workplace experience, in general, for those working in and for those who intend to work in the region. This chapter captures the important theoretical lenses in the mentoring literature, and also provides a clear demarcation between negative mentoring and dysfunctional mentoring. This is followed by contextualizing mentoring as per four of Hofstede's six cultural dimensions by dwelling on mentoring experience in countries such as China, India, Pakistan, Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. It is hoped that this chapter will pave the way for further research, which may be a precursor for theory development.

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Theme 1 Country Review

Abstract

Drawing on social exchange theory, we consider mentoring in Indonesia in terms of practices and challenges. Characterized by high power distance, mentoring in Indonesia is formal, with certain performance criteria set by the organization for the selection of mentors. While the extent of formality differs depending on the organizational culture, mentoring is perceived to consist of relationship building that goes beyond a superior–subordinate relationship. Preliminary findings of this study also indicate several challenges in the mentoring relationship, one being the expectation to conform and the consequent punishment if one were to disobey orders. Another challenge is the lack of training for the mentors. Participants further noted the challenge associated with gift-giving practices whereby mentees are often obliged to give gifts to the mentors, given the high power distance context. Furthermore, obtaining continuous commitment from top leaders poses another challenge. We also discuss theoretical and practical implications of this study for mentoring, leadership and employee development, thus adding to the literature on workplace mentoring in an emerging economy.

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While mentoring plays an important role in Japanese working places, formal mentoring programs have only recently been introduced. This chapter provides an overview of the development of mentoring in Japan and presents a conceptual model to comprehend mentoring in Japan and beyond. The chapter begins with the illustration of how the characteristics of Japanese organizations and Japanese-style human resource management (HRM) promoted the naturally occurring informal mentoring in the Japanese workplace in early years. In response to the stagnating economy and declining demographics during the last few decades, many Japanese firms adopted Western-style HRM practices, including formal mentoring programs. We provide statistical data to demonstrate the widespread adoption of formal mentoring programs in recent years. We then report the results of the systematic review of the academic literature on mentoring in Japan, suggesting that research on mentoring in Japan is still in the early stage. Based on the historical overview, current data and the systematic review of the academic literature, we develop a conceptual model of how the socio-cultural and economic context as well as organizational characteristics influence the adoption of Japanese-style naturally occurring informal mentoring and/or Western-style formal mentoring practices. We conclude this chapter with practical and theoretical implications.

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Abstract

This exploratory study investigates how mentoring is perceived and undertaken by the concerned parties, namely, mentor and protégé, and organizations in the context of Thailand.

A qualitative approach using dyadic case studies (of manager and subordinates) was taken to reflect whether mentoring is formally established in Thai business organizations, what benefits are experienced by mentors and mentees (protégés) and how the Thai business organizations can fully benefit from mentoring system. Based on the sample case studies, it is found that mentoring is perceived as teaching and advising how to perform a job well and mainly by one's supervisor. Factors that influence the effectiveness of mentoring system include clear organizational policies, HRM practices (i.e. orientation, training and development, performance appraisal, rewards, etc.), mentoring evaluation, trust and integrity and perceived risk.

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Theme 2 Perspectives

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Drawing on the social cognitive theory, this study investigated the effect of mentors' drinking norms on their protégés' alcohol misuse by focusing on the mediating role of conformity drinking motives and the moderating role of moral disengagement. We conducted a three-wave survey of 148 mentor–protégé dyads and found that mentors' drinking norms were positively related to their protégés' alcohol misuse and that this relationship was fully mediated by conformity drinking motives. Moreover, the moderated mediation model revealed that moral engagement strengthens the main effects of mentors' drinking norms on conformity drinking motives and the indirect effects of mentors' drinking norms on protégés' alcohol misuse via enhanced conformity drinking motives. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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The overarching aim of this chapter is to explore the existing status of mentoring in accounting firms in India and Malaysia, to understand whether or not mentoring is gendered in these country contexts, and to investigate the impact of the size of the firm and country context on mentoring. The mentoring framework is used as a theoretical lens to understand the orientation of principals and partners towards the existing and future mentoring support and activities of micro-sized, small-sized, medium-sized, and family-owned accounting firms operating in both India and Malaysia. Data obtained from 40 in-depth interviews (n = 20 in India and n = 20 in Malaysia) are analyzed using qualitative data analysis software NVivo12. The findings obtained from the study indicate that mentoring support exists informally in accounting firms, mentoring support offered and mentoring activities undertaken are gendered, and the nature, extent and type of mentoring offered in accounting firms varies according to the size of the firm in both countries. The chapter presents important practical, theoretical and methodological implications of the study for avoiding gendered mentoring practices in accounting firms.

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Abstract

This chapter examines how leader–member dyadic communication in the Malaysian workplace operates at the leader–member dyadic level in the context of cultural norms. We propose a model of leader–member dyadic communication based on the cultural norms of budi bicara, which in turn influences the perception of workplace mentoring in Malaysia. The model is tested by using hierarchical multiple regression with data obtained from a sample of 510 employees in three Malaysian organizations. Results show that leader–member dyadic communication in the workplace is linked with the career mentoring perceptions. These findings partially validate our proposed model and provide empirical support for the central roles of communication exchange processes in mentoring.

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Theme 3 Case Studies

Abstract

This chapter dwells upon reverse mentoring as a specific kind of mentoring practice. This chapter draws upon a consulting assignment on reverse mentoring at a global metal company in India. Presented in the form of a case study, this chapter highlights the possible conditions under which reverse mentoring becomes a strategic HR initiative in an organization. It does this by drawing attention to various contextual dimensions such as organizational culture of the firm, the socio-cultural and economic context of the firm. After describing the process of setting up a reverse mentoring program, it also suggests the manner in which reverse mentoring addresses some of concerns arising from such a context, as well as the manner in which efficacy of the practice is likely to be impacted by those conditions such as high power distance.

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Abstract

Mentoring is an intense relationship between a senior experienced individual who is the mentor and a less experienced individual who is the protégé. Mentors provide counselling, guidance, advice, support and feedback for the protégé's personal and professional development. With the well-being of the family as the central issue in family firms, mentoring is often seen to be akin to a parent–child relationship. In Bangladesh, paternalistic and informal parental mentoring is the norm for grooming children both morally and professionally. Using six caselets of large family firms of Bangladesh, this chapter provides insight into the paternalistic style of mentoring, and also the generational differences in mentoring between the firm's owner and his successor.

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Abstract

Indian businesses are expanding to other parts of the world, and companies from across the globe are setting up businesses in India. For executives – both foreign and Indian – to thrive in India and abroad, it has become just as important for foreign executives and expatriates to understand India as it has become imperative for Indian executives to gain a global perspective. As a result of this fast-changing scenario, the demand for coaching is rising in India. This chapter seeks to understand the dynamics of being a European (German) Life Coach in India who also happens to be a woman. It explores cross-cultural coaching in India and attempts to provide some pointers on how to navigate through cultural differences, understanding cultural intelligence/cultural quotient, gaining intercultural sensitivity and helping clients with cross-cultural conflict resolution.

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This chapter critically examines a Pakistani initiative on youth mentoring at workplace, namely the National Internship Program (NIP), which aims to increase fresh graduates' capability and employability. Through a situational analysis of prevalent education systems, occupational choices and job-related tendencies of Pakistani youth in the backdrop of mega economic activities like the China–Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC), this chapter brings forth virtues and limitations of NIP. Further, an elaborative appraisal of the key features, design and process of NIP through an illustrative cycle, a conceptual model has been designed which may fulfil the mentoring needs of developing countries. This conceptual model of youth mentoring at workplace proposes a cycle of six activities: planning, engaging, performing, appraising, ensuing and reflecting.

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Index

Pages 229-233
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Cover of Mentorship-driven Talent Management
DOI
10.1108/9781789736915
Publication date
2020-06-12
Editors
ISBN
978-1-78973-691-5