A Guide to Planning and Managing Open Innovative Ecosystems

Cover of A Guide to Planning and Managing Open Innovative Ecosystems
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(13 chapters)

Prelims

Pages i-ix
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Abstract

The rise of the digital economy has led to a focus on how to manage big data and business intelligence for entrepreneurial purposes. The aim of this chapter is to discuss how to plan for open innovative ecosystems that harness the potential of new data analytics techniques in order to progress society. This means concentrating on the increasingly complex world of data analytics in order to derive information about potential entrepreneurial opportunities. The role of knowledge management in influencing an open innovation ecosystem predicated on big data and computing acumen is stated. This helps to understand how the future of the global economy relies on an open data policy that encourages the sharing and dissemination of information. Implications for managers are also suggested that emphasize the role of innovation ecosystems, data and government.

Abstract

This chapter uses an intellectual capital (IC) qualitative approach for assessing the bio health technologies entrepreneurial ecosystem of a university located in Southern Europe, aiming to identify the role played by IC in fostering the sustainable success of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. There has been limited research dedicated to deepening the knowledge of the entrepreneurial ecosystems’ dimensions, using an IC lens, in the context of university cities with different dimensions. Small cities may not have some dimensions, so developed, comparing with the ones of the ecosystems of large urban centers. This chapter uses a qualitative approach funded in a case study exploring internal and external stakeholders of a Portuguese entrepreneurial ecosystem, UBImedical, targeted at the bio health sector. The study is part of an exploratory study funded in the scope of a European Project, aiming to explore in a pioneering way the application of the dominant triad of capitals forming IC and, thus, identifying and understanding the dimensions of different entrepreneurial ecosystems. The case study reveals that the IC’s dimensions more critical for the success of the bio health entrepreneurial ecosystems are the structural capital and the relational capital, although human capital is perceived as a basic prerequisite for fostering the entrepreneurial ecosystem’s performance. The results are funded in primary and qualitative data collected from the interviews developed to previously identified external and internal stakeholders of this type of entrepreneurial ecosystem under study.

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to contribute to the theory building of transformative university by delivering two conceptual models for legitimizing entrepreneurial university with a transformative role in quadruple helix for sustainability governance structures as being nominated as “responsible facilitator.” This chapter draws many theoretical insights sourced from Entrepreneurial University (Etzkowitz, 1988), Institutional Theory (Scott, 1987), quadruple/quintuple helix (Carayannis & Campbell, 2009a, b) and Responsible Innovation (Owen, Macnaghten, & Stilgoe, 2012) in order to frame the resulting conceptual models of transformative university for sustainability and quadruple helix for sustainability governance. The conceptual models offer a new paradigm discussion for the changing role of universities in knowledge economy and opens up for further investigation of quadruple helix actors namely as transformative university, society, industry and government for strategic capital, social capital, economic capital and culture–human capital interventions in sustainability governance. The second model illustrates the key interventions of quadruple helix actors in four pillars of capital delivering concrete examples of activities. The originality of this chapter lies in its discourse articulating a multilayered approach for the institutionalization of entrepreneurial university embedded in a responsible innovation ecosystem based on individual, organizational and macro-level perspectives. Quadruple helix actors are nominated as “responsible facilitator,” “hybrid hub,” “agile regulator” and “pressure beneficiary” roles for their relevant place in sustainability governance structure.

Abstract

Nowadays, the higher education sector has to deal with a scope of strategic issues that goes beyond the management of curricular processes and training courses. The growing competitiveness of the sector has led higher education institutions to give more attention to the marketing field. In fact, higher education institutions can be seen as brands and students as real consumers. Emotional marketing and its techniques, in particular, represent a range of opportunities for universities to strengthen their brands and their connection with the students. In this study, it is suggested that the aspects of attachment can be analyzed in the context of higher education as it aims to provide important insights for the success of university brands in a long-term perspective. Attachment has a relation with satisfaction, commitment, trust and loyalty. These aspects are relevant for universities especially since the relationship higher education institutions maintain with their students in the present and future depends, in certain part, on their degree of attachment and sense of belonging.

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of several social-cognitive models that have been lately applied in public health and donation contexts. The current review included the elaboration likelihood model (ELM), the prototype willingness model (PWM), and the organ donation model (ODM). This review also details and discusses the main strengths and limitations of these models. Importantly, this review helps to identify the gap of the current social marketing and health-care literature. In particular, this chapter provides a solid theoretical foundation and has initiated further pathways for future researchers who are interested in the fields of public health and social change literature, organ donation context, as well as social-cognitive decision-making models. The significance of this review is defined by advancing public health practitioners, social marketing communicators, and educationalists, evidencing how conceptual models can inform and guide the research.

Abstract

In recent years, business companies are challenged with various difficulties in connection to human resources (HR), for example, adapting to one’s sentiments, managing debates, developing collaboration, affecting leadership, addressing motives, interpersonal susceptibility, dealing with capabilities and also individual emotional intelligence (EI) or inward characteristics (e.g. moral qualities). Expanding on and reaching out earlier and ongoing work, the scope of this research is to experimentally look at the connection between the components of EI and ethics in contemporary organizations and their resulting impact on employees’ motives and performance. A quantitative method was utilized, and an entirety of 386 questionnaires was collected from three diverse high-tech new businesses based in Greece and analyzed with SPSS programing. For triangulation reasons, auxiliary information from the organizations’ sites were gathered and a meeting with each organization’s executive of the HR division was held. The outcomes propose that ethical values add to motives and thus employee motives add to employee performance. Helpful administrative ramifications resulted from this research.

Abstract

The sports field is in constant change and adaptation, which leads to a need to explore new strategies to achieve success. This is why interest in technology has increased in recent years. However, despite its undeniable importance, there is no quantitative data that provides a macroscopic view of the existing literature. Therefore, the objective of this study is to carry out a bibliometric analysis that provides structured information on the origin and academic evolution of technology in the sports field. To this end, a total of 170 articles published between 1977 and 2019 in the Web of Science (Core Collection) related to technology in sport have been analyzed. The 170 publications cover 396 authors, 134 journals, 37 countries and 261 institutions. In order to carry out the analyses, authors, journal, institution and country have been taken into account, as well as the co-authoring, co-citation and co-words networks. This information can provide an overview of the three thematic areas found: (i) technology in sport from an educational perspective, (ii) technology in sport from a medical-performance perspective, and (iii) technology in sport from a management perspective.

Abstract

Sport is an international activity due to its cultural, economic and social significance in the global economy. This chapter focuses on the international aspect of sport in terms of international sports organizations and the internationalization of sports firms. To do this, this chapter highlights the role of branding, social media and marketing in international sports activities. This includes a discussion of how the Olympics and World Cup have influenced internationalization and the impact of athletes increasingly becoming global celebrities. The impact of new technological innovations is also stressed that shows the increased international relevance of sport.

Abstract

Traditional industry was initially built with kinship, cultural value, and unique characters representing a particular system of production. However, current industry challenges pressurized traditional industry bond of primordial system with the need of adaptations to survive. Some traditional industry may resist the twenty-first-century challenges and pressures, but many of them are transforming their cultural and production characters to adapt modern business competitions. Indonesian traditional furniture industry Jepara has their familial system of productions which constitute “flexible specialization” where particular kinship and work contract created from a very specialized household small-scale furniture producer. However, this production system in fact struggles and is contrasted with the community needs to survive in the industry. The likely occurring progress of traditional industry are then remaining on the senior members of the industry to preserve knowledge which has empowered over many generations, while the younger generations consider transforming their ability for survivability and better financial rewards.

This chapter is the further elaboration of how Indonesian rural traditional furniture industry in Jepara presents its survivability and whether it is sustainable. This chapter exemplifies participants’ quotes and statements which create anxiety toward their future, cultural value, bond of industry kinship, and doubting their ability to withhold global and local pressures.

Abstract

The high rate of unemployment among university graduates has raised concerns. Responding to this, universities feel obliged to encourage and train their students to be able to create their own jobs. Many universities try to improve student entrepreneurial skills by opening entrepreneurship programs in the form of study programs or concentration. This concern does not only occur in Indonesia but also in many universities in other countries. Although the role of entrepreneurship is important for a country’s development, the availability of a large number of entrepreneurs does not guaranty improvement of people’s life or welfare. Increasing competition in business sometimes makes people justify all kinds of business practices. However, if a fair condition for all actors is expected, then university must encourage the creation of moral and ethical business activities. This study intends to know whether (1) need for achievement (nAch), self-efficacy, and instruments readiness influence student entrepreneurship intentions; (2) gender, entrepreneurship experience, and parental background moderate the influence of nAch, self-efficacy, and instrument readiness influence student entrepreneurial intention; and (3) ethical behavior view moderates the influence of nAch, self-efficacy, and instrument readiness on student entrepreneurial intentions. This research observed 315 new students of a university in Indonesia in 2018. The results show that nAch, self-efficacy, and instruments readiness significantly influence entrepreneurial intentions. Gender and parent background moderate the influence of nAch, self-efficacy, and instrument readiness on entrepreneurial intentions, while entrepreneurial experience had no effect. Furthermore, ethical views do not moderate the influence of nAch, self-efficacy, and instrument readiness on entrepreneurial intention.

Abstract

One of the factors that determines the success of marketing a product is a distribution strategy. Several factors affect distribution such as the number of products, the nature of the products, the size of the area, transportation facilities, communication facilities, company factors, cost factors, and market conditions. The authors realized the absence of research on distribution management on a product such as the 3-kg liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) aimed at reaching the poor in Indonesia. The use of LPG as fuel is considered relatively cleaner because pollution is less when compared to kerosene fuel. This research was conducted in Salatiga, a small town in the province of Central Java, Indonesia. This research applied descriptive statistics in the form of the distribution frequency and crosstabs, as well as multiple regression. This research revealed that the 3-kg LPG distribution is very intensive, spread in almost all places including shops or stalls in both urban and rural areas. The choice of using 3-kg LPG tubes is not only because the price is low and is subsidized by the government but also because of the custom that has been instilled by the government when encouraging people to convert kerosene to LPG.

Index

Pages 185-189
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Cover of A Guide to Planning and Managing Open Innovative Ecosystems
DOI
10.1108/9781789734096
Publication date
2020-10-16
Editors
ISBN
978-1-78973-409-6
eISBN
978-1-78973-409-6