Development and validation of a social inclusion questionnaire to evaluate the impact of attending a modernised mental health day service

Federica Marino‐Francis (Academic Unit of Psychiatry, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences and Public Health Research, University of Leeds, UK)
Anne Worrall‐Davies (Academic Unit of Psychiatry, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences and Public Health Research, University of Leeds, UK)

Mental Health Review Journal

ISSN: 1361-9322

Publication date: 2 April 2010

Abstract

The concept of social inclusion features prominently in current policy and practice developments in mental health services. The Social Exclusion Unit (2006) highlighted the need for mental health day services to promote inclusion and participation, by integrating with the wider community, and by supporting and encouraging users to access opportunities in the local community. The Leeds i3 (inspire, improve, include) project aimed to modernise local mental health day services accordingly. The aim of our study was to develop and validate a measure of social inclusion to be used in mental health day services in Leeds. The underlying assumption was that recent changes in mental health day service provision would substantially improve social inclusion of the service users.The social inclusion questionnaire was developed through extensive iterative consultation with mental health service users and staff, and its reliability was proven using test‐retest statistics. It was shown to be a simple, inexpensive, user‐friendly and repeatable measure that could be used routinely by mental health day services. Factor analysis of the questionnaire showed that social inclusion had seven important components. We suggest that these components form a useful basis for discussion with service users, as well as for planning and evaluating services.

Keywords

Citation

Marino‐Francis, F. and Worrall‐Davies, A. (2010), "Development and validation of a social inclusion questionnaire to evaluate the impact of attending a modernised mental health day service", Mental Health Review Journal, Vol. 15 No. 1, pp. 37-48. https://doi.org/10.5042/mhrj.2010.0201

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2010, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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