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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Abiodun Olatunji Abisuga, Cynthia Changxin Wang and Riza Yosia Sunindijo

This study aims to explore the various approaches used in the general customer service industry to develop a conceptual framework for evaluating the responses of facility…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the various approaches used in the general customer service industry to develop a conceptual framework for evaluating the responses of facility managers to user post-occupancy feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses conceptual analysis based on a comprehensive review of relevant literature.

Findings

The results of the study established 24 propositions which are categorised under organisational response dimensions specific to facilities management (FM): timeliness, facilitation, redress, apology, credibility of explanation, attentiveness, effort and their relationships with overall satisfaction and post-feedback behaviour, such as word of mouth and acceptance to continue using the facilities.

Research limitations/implications

The established propositions are derived from existing theories using a deductive approach. The framework can be further enhanced to suit various applications in FM services.

Practical implications

This conceptual framework is a generic model, appropriate to many FM scenarios. The framework can be used to develop standard policies and procedures to foster and encourage collaborative relationships between users and facility managers. It reinforces transparency and trust between facility managers and users during the operation and management of the facilities, and improves FM effectiveness, facility performance and user post-occupancy experience.

Originality/value

In the FM area, no systematic approach has been previously established to evaluate and improve the response process to the usersfeedback. The proposed framework is a pioneer contribution in this area.

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Clemens Schefels and Roberto V. Zicari

An important issue in the management of a web‐based user community, where users are registered to a web portal, is to identify patterns of users' interest. In this…

Abstract

Purpose

An important issue in the management of a web‐based user community, where users are registered to a web portal, is to identify patterns of users' interest. In this context, the users' feedback plays a major role. The purpose of this paper is to define a novel framework analysis for managing the feedback given by registered visitors of a web site.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a new technique to integrate the feedback explicitly given by users into already existing user profiles. The authors introduce the novel concepts of scope, filtering, and relevance profiles for managing users' feedback. The new concept of Relevance Profile (RP) is defined.

Findings

Using the framework, the authors were able to discover patterns of usage of registered users of a web site.

Practical implications

The practical applicability of the approach is validated by a use case study showing how the framework can be used with a real web site. The authors used Gugubarra as a reference system, a prototype for creating and managing web user profiles, developed by the DBIS group at the Goethe‐University of Frankfurt.

Originality/value

A new way to integrate the user feedback into interest profiles and a novel framework to analyze and discover patterns of interests are presented. The paper is an extended version (more than 50 per cent novel material) of a previous paper presented at the iiWAS2010 conference.

Details

International Journal of Web Information Systems, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-0084

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2019

Tingting Zhang, William Yu Chung Wang and Angsana A. Techatassanasoontorn

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational process underlying users’ intention to provide feedback on user-contributed knowledge in professional online…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the motivational process underlying users’ intention to provide feedback on user-contributed knowledge in professional online communities. User feedback can serve as a means of indicating the credibility of the online content, which can help community members in their knowledge-seeking process. Adopting such a user feedback mechanism is beneficial for users to identify relevant and credible content efficiently and for an online community to sustain itself.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on self-determination theory, an integrated model is proposed. In this model, behavioural intention is defined as the consequence of motivational orientations whose antecedences include various social factors. The model is empirically tested using survey data collected online and the structural equation modelling techniques.

Findings

The results show that users’ intention to provide feedback is primarily influenced by autonomous motivation. Autonomous motivation is in turn affected by social factors, including reciprocity, online reputation, trust in the user involvement mechanisms and affective and normative community commitments.

Originality/value

This study adds value to prior studies by stressing the significance and feasibility of user feedback in helping members of professional online communities with their knowledge-seeking process. It also contributes to the literature on user participation in these communities by showing the efficacy of a motivational process perspective and the role of motivational orientations, in particular, in explaining users’ behavioural intention.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 14 April 2010

Hugh Masters and Susanne Forrest

Mental health service user involvement in education has gained momentum and prominence over the past decade, but service user involvement in the assessment of students'…

Abstract

Mental health service user involvement in education has gained momentum and prominence over the past decade, but service user involvement in the assessment of students' practice remains underdeveloped. This paper reports findings from a qualitative analysis of documentary data that captured service users' feedback to mental health student nurses about their practice. Third year mental health nursing students in acute inpatient placements were required to elicit, record and reflect on the feedback that service users gave them about their practice.One hundred and eighty eight accounts of this feedback were analysed and findings are presented in terms of the methods that students used to gain feedback and the issues that emerged from this. The analysis also explored the role that students appear to play in care delivery and what aspects of their role service users most valued. The impact that the feedback had on the students' learning and practice is examined and discussed in relation to future opportunities for, and likely barriers to, continued service user involvement in assessing students' practice.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2015

Vimala Balakrishnan, Kian Ahmadi and Sri Devi Ravana

– The purpose of this paper is to improve users’ search results relevancy by manipulating their explicit feedback.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve users’ search results relevancy by manipulating their explicit feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

CoRRe – an explicit feedback model integrating three popular feedback, namely, Comment-Rating-Referral is proposed in this study. The model is further enhanced using case-based reasoning in retrieving the top-5 results. A search engine prototype was developed using Text REtrieval Conference as the document collection, and results were evaluated at three levels (i.e. top-5, 10 and 15). A user evaluation involving 28 students was administered, focussing on 20 queries.

Findings

Both Mean Average Precision and Normalized Discounted Cumulative Gain results indicate CoRRe to have the highest retrieval precisions at all the three levels compared to the other feedback models. Furthermore, independent t-tests showed the precision differences to be significant. Rating was found to be the most popular technique among the participants, producing the best precision compared to referral and comments.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that search retrieval relevance can be significantly improved when users’ explicit feedback are integrated, therefore web-based systems should find ways to manipulate usersfeedback to provide better recommendations or search results to the users.

Originality/value

The study is novel in the sense that users’ comment, rating and referral were taken into consideration to improve their overall search experience.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 68 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Amanda Spink, Bernard J. Jansen and H. Cenk Ozmultu

Examines the use of query reformulation, and particularly the use of relevance feedback by users of the Excite Web search engine. A total of 985 user search sessions from…

Abstract

Examines the use of query reformulation, and particularly the use of relevance feedback by users of the Excite Web search engine. A total of 985 user search sessions from a data set of 18,113 user search sessions containing 51,473 queries were examined. Includes a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 191 user sessions including more than one query, to examine patterns of user query reformulation; and second, all 804 user sessions including relevance feedback were examined. Results show limited use of query reformulation and relevance feedback by Excite users – only one in five users reformulated queries. Most relevance feedback sessions were successful. Identifies the most common pattern of searching and discusses implications for Web search system design.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Anders Fundin and Mattias Elg

The purpose of this paper is to explore routes of dissatisfaction feedback transferrals within a Swedish machine industry segment. The study focuses upon transferrals from…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore routes of dissatisfaction feedback transferrals within a Swedish machine industry segment. The study focuses upon transferrals from dissatisfied users to the product development organizations. There is also an interest in determining whether the feedback is reliable and, if not, how to improve the reliability of this information to create a better basis for decision‐making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the results from a qualitative interview‐based study of 16 product development organizations and their customer dissatisfaction feedback systems. About 84 percent of the companies within a machine industry segment in Sweden are covered. Based on the empirical investigation, a typology describes four different dissatisfaction feedback constructs, depending on whether the feedback system is active or passive, and on whether the feedback is codified or personalized.

Findings

The study indicates that parallel usage of codified and personalized dissatisfaction feedback, compared to using these transferrals in isolation only, improves reliability of dissatisfaction information and puts product developers in a better position when deciding on future actions. However, a real challenge is how to turn passive dissatisfaction routes into active ones. Managing passive dissatisfaction routes with service personnel and call centres as knowledge carriers more actively in product development can certainly reveal many of the hidden needs of users.

Originality/value

Our project is essentially managerial, aiming to provide managers and other decision‐makers with a framework to establish reliable and adequate customer feedback systems for more effective product development.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 23 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Woonkian Chong, Simon Rudkin and Junhui Zhang

Exponential growth in online video content makes viewing choice and video promotion increasingly challenging. While explicit recommendation systems have value, they…

Abstract

Purpose

Exponential growth in online video content makes viewing choice and video promotion increasingly challenging. While explicit recommendation systems have value, they inherently distract the user from normal behaviour and are open to numerous biases. To enhance user interest evaluation accuracy, the purpose of this paper is to comprehensively examine the relationship between implicit feedback and online video content, and reviews gender differentials in the interest indicated by a comprehensive set of viewer responses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper includes 200 useable observations based on an experiment of user interaction with the Youku platform (one of the largest video-hosting websites in China). Logistic regression was employed for its simple interpretation to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The findings demonstrate gender differentials in cursor movement behaviour, explainable via well-studied splits in personality, biological factors, primitive behaviour and emotion management. This work offers a solution to the sparsity of work on implicit feedback, contributing to the literature that combines explicit and implicit feedback.

Practical implications

This study offers a launch point for further work on human–computer interaction, and highlights the importance of looking beyond individual metrics to embrace wider human traits in video site design and implementation.

Originality/value

This paper links implicit feedback to online video content for the first time, and demonstrates its value as an interest capturing tool. By reviewing gender differentials in the interest indicated by a comprehensive set of viewer responses, this paper indicates how user characteristics remain critical. Consequently, this work signposts highly fruitful directions for both practitioners and researchers.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 119 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2015

Karen Bamford and Carl Benton

Engaging with people with a learning disability to develop and enhance service provision is central to the ethos of personalisation and citizenship. Despite this there…

Abstract

Purpose

Engaging with people with a learning disability to develop and enhance service provision is central to the ethos of personalisation and citizenship. Despite this there appears to be a lack of research to gather users’ views on how they feel the services meet their unique needs and how these could be improved. A service evaluation was developed to understand service user’s experience of accessing a community forensic service (CFS). The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire was conducted by an independent third party experienced in facilitating complex communication, utilising a written format and Widget Rebus symbols. Questions were based on Trust Values, family and friends test and clinical forensic engagement. The samples were service users open to the CFS on 1 July 2014.

Findings

Data were gathered from 28 individuals, there was an even spread of ages 17-65. In all, 93 per cent understood what help they needed from the service, there was acknowledgement of who they would go to if they wanted to complain, 100 per cent were happy with how information had been provided, most felt the service was respectful, fair, friendly and they were listened to.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that more needs to be done around understanding and engagement in care planning. There are plans to gather information from direct carers and setting up focus groups to further understand some of the issues and ways forward.

Originality/value

Asking for feedback from people who have offended, some of whom now experience increased restrictions, is fraught with concern and approached with trepidation. However, the responses received contradict the natural instincts. The results showed promising appreciation of the support received in the context of everyday lives and positive risk taking.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Dimitrios Rigas and Abdulrhman Alharbi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the usability (effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction) of e‐feedback interfaces. The experiment compares a traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the usability (effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction) of e‐feedback interfaces. The experiment compares a traditional visual approach with a multimodal approach in order to determine the impact of multimodal metaphors upon the user's understanding, reasoning and engagement with the e‐feedback.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical investigation involved visual (text with graphical illustrations) and multimodal (audio‐visual with expressive avatars and recorded speech) experimental e‐feedback platforms. Both experimental platforms provided the same e‐feedback but used different interaction metaphors to convey the information. The evaluation approach measured effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction.

Findings

The results showed that the multimodal approach increased usability in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and engagement of users with the e‐feedback. There is a very clear prima facie case that combining different communication metaphors to convey information involved in the e‐feedback simultaneously does not increase the information overload on users. This however was observed to be the case when the visual channel was used.

Originality/value

This paper introduces a unique approach that uses specific combinations of multimodal metaphors to communicate information about e‐feedback simultaneously. This approach increased the usability of e‐feedback and user's engagement in interfaces for e‐learning applications.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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