INX double-certifies inks and inbound ink ingredients to be “lead-free”

Pigment & Resin Technology

ISSN: 0369-9420

Article publication date: 4 July 2008

Citation

(2008), "INX double-certifies inks and inbound ink ingredients to be “lead-free”", Pigment & Resin Technology, Vol. 37 No. 4. https://doi.org/10.1108/prt.2008.12937dab.037

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


INX double-certifies inks and inbound ink ingredients to be “lead-free”

Article Type: Environment and safety From: Pigment & Resin Technology, Volume 37, Issue 4

There has been a steady stream of news about product recalls due to lead, mercury and other hazardous elements being detected in numerous goods that consumers buy and use daily.

INX International Ink Co., the world leader in metal decorating inks for beverage cans, decorative tins and numerous other 2 and 3 piece metal packaging, complies with federal and international standards concerning lead and other heavy, high-toxicity metals. Toxics in Packaging Clearinghouse Model Legislation (formerly known as CONEG – “Coalition of Northeastern Governors” Legislation) specifically prohibits use of lead, cadmium, hexavalent chromium and mercury.

INX also requires its suppliers of pigments and other chemical raw materials to certify that their products comply with applicable standards. This calls for independent analyses as well as supplier-company certification.

In addition, INX further confirms results by having its own, independent third-party analysis performed on these materials – in particular, all inbound pigments. And INX has increased its random analyses of ink products.

“We are proactively providing additional quality assurance above and beyond our previous practices,” said Jonathan Ellaby, Vice President, International Division for INX International. “All products used in our AP LOVOC, AP Retort, AP Novar, INXCure TP and TP 2004 series inks continue to exceed requirements of established safety regulations, with no contamination even approaching published thresholds.”