Corporate greening through prosocial extrarole behaviours - a conceptual framework for employee motivation

Human Resource Management International Digest

ISSN: 0967-0734

Article publication date: 25 April 2008

Keywords

Citation

Killmer, A.B.C. (2008), "Corporate greening through prosocial extrarole behaviours - a conceptual framework for employee motivation", Human Resource Management International Digest, Vol. 16 No. 3. https://doi.org/10.1108/hrmid.2008.04416cad.006

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited


Corporate greening through prosocial extrarole behaviours - a conceptual framework for employee motivation

Article Type: Abstracts From: Human Resource Management International Digest, Volume 16, Issue 3.

Ramus C.A. Killmer A.B.C. Business Strategy and the Environment, December 2007, Vol. 16 No. 8, Start page: 554, No. of pages: 17

Purpose to explain how to motivate employees to engage in corporate greening initiatives. Design/methodology/approach sees greening behaviours as pro-social behaviours intended to promote the welfare of an individual, group or organization, maintains that, at the corporate level, greening behaviour has the potential to create added value, illustrates how corporate greening behaviours are related to other employee behaviours, e.g. extra-role behaviours, and identifies four motivational drivers of extra-role behaviours, i.e. supervisory support, social norms, personal predisposition and self-efficacy. Draws on expectancy theory and behavioural intent models to extend an integrative motivation model (IMM), incorporates the four motivational drivers, depicts the framework, and lays out the associated mathematical models that link overt behaviour of developing/proposing an eco-initiative to behavioural intent to engage in an eco-initiative, pre-disposition to eco-initiatives, belief in the efficacy of the behaviour to lead to the desired outcome, motivation toward the outcome, and employee perception of organizational norms. Suggests how the framework/model can be applied in the workplace, advocates analysis of employee motivation, assessing which outcomes are important to employees and obtaining information on employee pre-disposition toward greening initiatives through questionnaires/surveys, uses expectancy-valence measures to assess employees’ belief they can both perform the task in question and that the task will lead to desired outcomes, and names models that measure/assess organizational norms. Originality/value extends organizational and behavioural theories to the field of environmental management.ISSN: 0964-4733Reference: 37AB444

Keywords: Employee attitudes, Environmental management, Expectancy theory, Individual behaviour, Motivation (psychology), Organizational behaviour