To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

British Food Journal Volume 54 Issue 10 1952

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 1 October 1952

Abstract

Various newspapers seem to agree that the Ministry of Food will cease to exist in the course of 1953. The increase, this month, in the price to the consumer of several rationed foods, as the result of reductions in subsidies, may facilitate the abolition of rationing at an early date—and this abolition, it is considered, will attract housewives' votes to the Conservative party, in addition to securing economies in administrative costs. If Mr. Churchill and Lord Woolton remain in office and decide to abolish the Ministry of Food, what remains to be considered is the extent to which its functions will remain and to what Department they will be allotted. For the abolition of all controls is just unthinkable and would involve economic chaos. It may be that some local authorities would welcome complete independence of central supervision in the administration of Food Laws. On the other hand, they would strongly deplore the cessation of the flow of those Statutory Instruments by which standards of composition and quality are set up. Nor would all manufacturers wish to see any backsliding in the matter of the control of advertisements and labels. In a recent issue of The Pharmaceutical Journal, an unnamed manufacturer expressed the view that it would be a pity if the good results achieved by the onlightened action of the Labelling Division of the Ministry of Food were allowed to slip away, and deplored the discontinuance of the Ministry's advisory service. For myself, I have no doubt that there must also remain great need and scope for centralised activities in the matter of limiting certain imports, restricting the sale of luxury articles in short supply (for example, cream, at certain periods of the year, at least) and various other controls required for economic reasons. It would be a pity to throw away the baby with the bath‐water.

Citation

(1952), "British Food Journal Volume 54 Issue 10 1952", British Food Journal, Vol. 54 No. 10, pp. 91-100. https://doi.org/10.1108/eb011488

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1952, MCB UP Limited