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Woe is the dark Web: the main challenges that governments of the Commonwealth Caribbean will face in combating dark Web-facilitated criminal activities

Lloyd Waller (Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica)
Stephen Christopher Johnson (School of Global Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, UK)
Nicola Satchell (Department of Government, State University of New York, New York, New York, USA)
Damion Gordon (Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica)
Gavin Leon Kirkpatrick Daley (Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica)
Howard Reid (Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica)
Kimberly Fender (Department of Government, The University of the West Indies, Mona Campus, Kingston, Jamaica)
Paula Llewellyn (Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Kingston, Jamaica)
Leah Smyle (College of Liberal Arts, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA)
Patrick Linton (Major Organised Crime and Anti-Corruption Agency, Kingston, Jamaica)

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy

ISSN: 1750-6166

Article publication date: 5 December 2022

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the potential challenges that governments in the Commonwealth Caribbean are likely to face combating crimes facilitated by the dark Web.

Design/methodology/approach

The “lived experience” methodology guided by a contextual systematic literature review was used to ground the investigation of the research phenomena in the researchers’ collective experiences working in, living in and engaging in research with governments in the Commonwealth Caribbean.

Findings

The two major findings emerging from the analysis are that jurisdictional and technical challenges are producing major hindrances to the creation of an efficient and authoritative legislative framework and the building of the capacity of governments in the Commonwealth Caribbean to confront the technicalities that affect systematic efforts to manage problems created by the dark Web.

Practical implications

The findings indicate the urgency that authorities in the Caribbean region must place on reevaluating their administrative, legislative and investment priorities to emphasize cyber-risk management strategies that will enable their seamless and wholesome integration into this digital world.

Originality/value

The research aids in developing and extending theory and praxis related to the problematization of the dark Web for governments by situating the experiences of Small Island Developing States into the ongoing discourse.

Keywords

Citation

Waller, L., Johnson, S.C., Satchell, N., Gordon, D., Daley, G.L.K., Reid, H., Fender, K., Llewellyn, P., Smyle, L. and Linton, P. (2022), "Woe is the dark Web: the main challenges that governments of the Commonwealth Caribbean will face in combating dark Web-facilitated criminal activities", Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, Vol. ahead-of-print No. ahead-of-print. https://doi.org/10.1108/TG-06-2022-0082

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

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