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Bullying and turnover intentions: how creative employees overcome perceptions of dysfunctional organizational politics

Dirk De Clercq (Goodman School of Business, Brock University, St. Catharines, Canada)
Tasneem Fatima (International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan)
Sadia Jahanzeb (Goodman School of Business, Brock University, St. Catharines, Canada)

Personnel Review

ISSN: 0048-3486

Article publication date: 3 September 2021

Issue publication date: 13 December 2022

508

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to unpack the relationship between employees' exposure to workplace bullying and their turnover intentions, with a particular focus on the possible mediating role of perceived organizational politics and moderating role of creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested with multi-source, multi-wave data collected from employees and their peers in various organizations.

Findings

Workplace bullying spurs turnover intentions because employees believe they operate in strongly politicized organizational environments. This mediating role of perceived organizational politics is mitigated to the extent that employees can draw from their creative skills though.

Practical implications

For managers, this study pinpoints a critical reason – employees perceive that they operate in an organizational climate that endorses dysfunctional politics – by which bullying behaviors stimulate desires to leave the organization. It also reveals how this process might be contained by spurring employees' creativity.

Originality/value

This study provides novel insights into the process that underlies the connection between workplace bullying and quitting intentions by revealing the hitherto overlooked roles of employees' beliefs about dysfunctional politics and their own creativity levels.

Keywords

Citation

De Clercq, D., Fatima, T. and Jahanzeb, S. (2022), "Bullying and turnover intentions: how creative employees overcome perceptions of dysfunctional organizational politics", Personnel Review, Vol. 51 No. 9, pp. 2239-2260. https://doi.org/10.1108/PR-05-2020-0326

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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