To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Severe mental illness & employment: cost-benefit analysis and dynamics of decision making

David Booth (Chartered Occupational Psychologist based at Department for Work and Pensions, Sheffield, UK)
Simon Francis (Senior Policy Advisor based at Department for Work and Pensions, Sheffield, UK)
Neil Mcivor (Chief Statistician based at Department for Work and Pensions, Sheffield, UK)
Patrick Hinson (Researcher, based at Sheffield, UK)
Benjamin Barton (Researcher, based at Sheffield, UK)

Mental Health and Social Inclusion

ISSN: 2042-8308

Article publication date: 4 November 2014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the economic benefits of Individual Placement with Support programmes commissioned by NHS North in the North West and Yorkshire and Humber regions.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted and data collected from supported employment programmes in four localities. An econometric analysis was performed to evaluate likely savings for local commissioners and return on investment for the Treasury.

Findings

Integration of employment support within mental health services is central to success. Econometric analysis showed that local commissioners could save £1,400 per additional job outcome by commissioning evidence-based interventions and there is a positive return on investment to the Treasury for every £1 spent there is a return to the Treasury of £1.04.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the economic and social value of evidence-based supported employment for people with severe mental illness. The economic data generated could be helpful in encouraging investment in effective employment support in other areas. The work, views and perspectives contained in this paper are those of the authors. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the organisations for whom the authors work.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

The work, views and perspectives contained in this paper are those of the authors. It does not necessarily reflect the views of the organisations for whom the authors work.

Citation

Booth, D., Francis, S., Mcivor, N., Hinson, P. and Barton, B. (2014), "Severe mental illness & employment: cost-benefit analysis and dynamics of decision making", Mental Health and Social Inclusion, Vol. 18 No. 4, pp. 215-223. https://doi.org/10.1108/MHSI-08-2014-0025

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited