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The effect of power and gender on technology acceptance

Lu Zhang (The School of Hospitality Business, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA)
Peter Nyheim (School of Hospitality Management, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA)
Anna S. Mattila (School of Hospitality Management, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA)

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology

ISSN: 1757-9880

Article publication date: 14 October 2014

1154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the joint effect of power and gender on individuals’ perceptions and evaluations of information systems (IS), and their behavioral intentions of technology acceptance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a 2 (powerful vs powerless) × 2 (female vs male) between-subject experimental design. A total of 128 subjects participated in the experiment.

Findings

The results suggest that there is a significant gender difference in terms of technology acceptance in the high-power condition. Further, such a gender difference is attenuated in the low-power condition. Specifically, when primed with the feeling of powerful, male users (vs female users) have higher computer self-efficacy and rate the IS as easier to use and more enjoyable. However, when the feeling of powerless was elicited, the effect of gender on technology acceptance disappeared.

Originality/value

The gender effect on technology acceptance has been widely studied. The current research extends the literature by considering the moderating effect of power on such a gender effect.

Keywords

Citation

Zhang, L., Nyheim, P. and S. Mattila, A. (2014), "The effect of power and gender on technology acceptance", Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, Vol. 5 No. 3, pp. 299-314. https://doi.org/10.1108/JHTT-03-2014-0008

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2014, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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