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The impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity: an integrative systematic review

Melissa Jane Carey (School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Engineering and Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, Australia) (School of Nursing, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand)
Melissa Taylor (School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Health Engineering and Sciences, University of Southern Queensland, Ipswich, Australia)

Journal of Health Organization and Management

ISSN: 1477-7266

Article publication date: 9 April 2021

Issue publication date: 8 October 2021

1312

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review was to explore the literature for evidence of the impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity, particularly within community care settings for diverse ageing populations.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrative systematic literature review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework combined with the EndNote reference management system. Following the collection and comprehensive screening process completion, a thematic analysis of the included articles occurred utilising within NVivo 12 software.

Findings

The review found that there was a paucity of evidence related to the relationship between interprofessional practice models (IPM) and health service equity for ageing populations. There is a need to improve collaborative practices between social care, public health care and health service providers to more clearly define team member roles. Key aspirations included the need for future innovations in health service delivery to place health service equity as a goal for interprofessional practice. There is a need to find ways to measure and articulate the impact for vulnerable populations and communities.

Research limitations/implications

The review offers insight into the need for health care delivery models to place health service equity at the centre of the model design. In practice settings, this includes setting interprofessional team goals around achieving equitable care outcomes for, and with, vulnerable populations. Implications for practice relate to improving how interprofessional teams work with communities to achieve health care equity.

Originality/value

There is a consensus across the literature that there continues to be health service inequity, yet IPE and interprofessional collaborative practice (IPC) have been growing in momentum for some time. Despite many statements that there is a link between interprofessional practice and improved health service equity and health outcomes, evidence for this is yet to be fully realised. This review highlights the urgent need to review the link between education and practice, and innovative health models of care that enable heath care professionals and social care providers to work together towards achieving health equity for ageing populations. It is clear that more evidence is required to establish evidence for best practice in interprofessional care that has the mitigation of health care inequity as a central objective.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Dr Melissa Jane Carey is funded by the Health Research Council New Zealand.

Citation

Carey, M.J. and Taylor, M. (2021), "The impact of interprofessional practice models on health service inequity: an integrative systematic review", Journal of Health Organization and Management, Vol. 35 No. 6, pp. 682-700. https://doi.org/10.1108/JHOM-04-2020-0165

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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