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Comparing two evidence-based parent training interventions for aggressive children

Sturla Fossum (Associate Professor, based at The Regional Centre for Child and Youth – North, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway)
John Kjøbli (Researcher, based at The Norwegian Center for Child Behavioural Development, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway)
May Britt Drugli (Professor, based at The Regional Centre for Child and Youth – Mid, The Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway)
Bjørn Helge Handegård (Senior Lecturer, based at The Regional Centre for Child and Youth – North, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway)
Willy-Tore Mørch (Professor in Children's Mental Health, based at The Regional Centre for Child and Youth – North, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway)
Terje Ogden (Research Director, based at The Norwegian Center for Child Behavioural Development, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway)

Journal of Children's Services

ISSN: 1746-6660

Publication date: 9 December 2014

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the changes in externalising behaviour for young aggressive children differ between two evidence-based parent training (PT) programmes after treatment. The treatment formats between these programmes differ, and the authors were particularly interested in whether this influenced the results for participants with co-occurring problems (child variables such as heightened levels of attention and internalising problems, and parental variables such as marital status and education) and the consequent additional risk of poorer treatment outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparison of the individual treatment programme “Parent Management Training – Oregon model” (PMTO) and the group intervention programme “The Incredible Years” (IY) basic training sessions. Outcomes were explored in matched samples from two earlier Norwegian replication studies. The participants were matched on pre-treatment characteristics using a quasi-experimental mis-matching procedure.

Findings

There were no significant differences between the two interventions in parent ratings of externalising behaviours and the lack of differing effects between the two treatments remained when the co-occurring risk factors were introduced into the analyses.

Research limitations/implications

The participants were matched on pre-treatment characteristics using a quasi-experimental mis-matching procedure.

Practical implications

A possible implication of these findings is that parents should be allowed to choose the treatment format of their preference. Further, individual PT may be more appropriate in rural settings with difficulties in forming group interventions.

Social implications

Treatment effects did not differ between these two evidence-based interventions.

Originality/value

To the best of the knowledge independent comparisons of two evidence-based PT interventions are not previously conducted.

Keywords

Citation

Fossum, S., Kjøbli, J., Britt Drugli, M., Helge Handegård, B., Mørch, W.-T. and Ogden, T. (2014), "Comparing two evidence-based parent training interventions for aggressive children", Journal of Children's Services, Vol. 9 No. 4, pp. 319-329. https://doi.org/10.1108/JCS-04-2014-0021

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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