Tea parties, whigs and compromise: the historical roots of u.s. government-business relations

John R. Bartle (University of Nebraska, Omaha)

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior

ISSN: 1093-4537

Publication date: 1 March 2010

Abstract

This article reviews the politics of government-business relations in the US from 1776 to the present. It argues that two major political interests, the agrarian democrats and the nationalist Whigs, created the context for discussion of economic policy that continues today. At times, pragmatic compromises have resolved the differences between these interests. The lessons from this history are instructive for today, and suggest potentially viable policies and coalitions to address business issues.

Citation

Bartle, J.R. (2010), "Tea parties, whigs and compromise: the historical roots of u.s. government-business relations", International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, Vol. 13 No. 3, pp. 342-353. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJOTB-13-03-2010-B002

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Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2010 by Pracademics Press

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