Migrant mental health and representation in routine administrative registers

Ciara Mary Close (Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK)
Tania Bosqui (Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK)
Dermot O’Reilly (Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK)
Michael Donnelly (Centre for Public Health, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK)
Anne Kouvonen (Department of Social Research, Helsingin Yliopisto, Helsinki, Finland)

International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care

ISSN: 1747-9894

Publication date: 5 March 2018

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increase in the use of registers and record linkages to study migrant mental health. However, the accuracy of these registers and the degree to which they are representative of the migrant population in Northern Ireland (NI) are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to explore: the coverage of the NI migrant population in general practitioner (GP) data and Census records; the issues faced by migrants in terms of registering and accessing the local health system; and the reporting of racial hate crimes against migrants to police.

Design/methodology/approach

Two focus groups of professionals (n=17) who worked with migrants were conducted. Group discussions were guided by a research-informed topic guide, and the data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Three main themes emerged: issues with the use of GP registration, Census and hate crime data for researching migrant mental health; barriers to health service use (e.g. low cultural awareness among health staff and access to interpreters); and risk factor exposure and mental health status in migrant communities (e.g. poverty, isolation and poor working conditions).

Originality/value

Record linkage and registry studies of migrant health and well-being using Census and health service sources need to be mindful of the likelihood that some migrants may be missed. The possible underrepresentation of migrants in health registers may be explained by reduced use of such services which may be caused my encountering staff with limited cultural competency and the inability to access an interpreter promptly.

Keywords

Citation

Close, C., Bosqui, T., O’Reilly, D., Donnelly, M. and Kouvonen, A. (2018), "Migrant mental health and representation in routine administrative registers", International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, Vol. 14 No. 1, pp. 82-95. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJMHSC-09-2016-0035

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Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2018, Emerald Publishing Limited

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