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Electromagnetic field along the power overhead line at point where the line route changes direction

Roman Hamar (Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Plzeň, Czech Republic)
Lenka Šroubová (Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Plzeň, Czech Republic)
Petr Kropík (Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of West Bohemia in Pilsen, Plzeň, Czech Republic)
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Abstract

Purpose

High-voltage overhead lines produce low-frequency electromagnetic fields around them. These fields are easy to compute wherever the line route is straight, as opposed to places where its direction is changed. The purpose of this paper is to perform a numerical analysis of an electromagnetic field occurring along a high-voltage overhead line at the places of the changed direction and to compare the results with the exposure limits for low-frequency electromagnetic fields in order to assess their effects on living organisms.

Design/methodology/approach

The computation was conducted in the MATLAB SW by means of a combination of integral and differential methods in a three-dimensional (3D) arrangement, taking into account the location and shape of the tower. Special procedures within the MATLAB software had to be coded.

Findings

Within the research, the following electromagnetic field quantities were computed: the distribution of electric field strength, magnetic flux density, Poynting vector, electric potential and surface charge density. The results obtained indicate the influence of both the line route changing its direction and the deviation tower location on the electromagnetic field around the tower.

Research limitations/implications

In order to shorten the computation time, it was necessary to achieve a minimum number of degrees of freedom by adjusting the real shape of both the cross-section of the deviation tower beam and the conductors. In some further research, attempts could be made to further optimize the results by using the real shapes of the cross-section of the deviation tower beam and the conductors. Furthermore, it could be beneficial to shorten the set distance between two adjacent nodes in order to obtain a finer mesh while still achieving an optimal ratio between the number of nodes and the computation time.

Practical implications

The Czech Regulation no. 1/2008 Coll., concerning protection of health against non-ionized radiation, stipulates 100 μT to be the maximum safe value of magnetic flux density in case of an uninterrupted exposure and frequency of 50 Hz. The investigated area did not exhibit values exceeding this limit. The same was true for the maximum permissible level of electric field strength being specified at 5,000 V/m.

Originality/value

Similar problems are often solved by means of FEM in 2D arrangements. However, when applying this method for conductors passing through a large 3D area, it is difficult to model an optimal 3D mesh within the conductors and the tower beams. This research shows that the application of integral methods reduces the complexity of the generated mesh. Unlike FEM, requiring the generation of a 3D mesh, the integral method only requires a surface mesh on the conductors and tower beams, thus significantly reducing the number of degrees of freedom. FEM only remains necessary for areas adjacent to the tower beams and conductors.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Financial support of project SGS 2012-039 is highly acknowledged.

Citation

Hamar, R., Šroubová, L. and Kropík, P. (2014), "Electromagnetic field along the power overhead line at point where the line route changes direction", COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, Vol. 33 No. 6, pp. 1950-1964. https://doi.org/10.1108/COMPEL-11-2013-0396

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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