Work grit as a moderator of politics perceptions: Workplace outcomes relationships: a three-study convergent investigation

Samantha L. Jordan (Department of Management, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA)
Wayne A. Hochwarter (Department of Management, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA) (Australia Catholic University, Brisbane, Australia)
Gerald R. Ferris (Department of Management, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, USA)
Aqsa Ejaz (Lahore Business School, University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan)

Career Development International

ISSN: 1362-0436

Publication date: 12 November 2018

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the interactive effects of grit (e.g. supervisor and employee) and politics perceptions on relevant work outcomes. Specifically, the authors hypothesized that supervisor and employee grit would each demonstrate neutralizing effects when examined jointly.

Design/methodology/approach

Three studies (N’s=526, 229, 522) were conducted to test the moderating effect across outcomes, including job satisfaction, turnover intentions, citizenship behavior and work effort. The authors controlled for affectivity and nonlinear main effect terms in Studies 2 and 3 following prior discussion.

Findings

Findings across studies demonstrated a unique pattern differentiating between grit sources (i.e. employee vs supervisor) and outcome characteristic (i.e. attitudinal vs behavioral). In sum, both employee and supervisor grit demonstrated neutralizing effects when operating in politically fraught work settings.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the single source nature of data collections, the authors took steps to minimize potential biasing factors (e.g. time separation, including affectivity). Future research will benefit from multiple sources of data as well as a more expansive view of the grit construct.

Practical implications

Work contexts have grown increasingly more political in recent years primarily as a result of social and motivational factors. Hence, the authors recommend that leaders investigate factors that minimize its potentially malignant effects. Although grit is often challenging to cultivate through interventions, selection and quality of work life programs may be useful in preparing workers to manage this pervasive source of stress.

Originality/value

Despite its practical appeal, grit’s impact in work settings has been under-studied, leading to apparent gaps in science and leadership development. Creative studies, building off the research, will allow grit to maximize its contributions to both scholarship and employee well-being.

Keywords

Citation

Jordan, S.L., Hochwarter, W.A., Ferris, G.R. and Ejaz, A. (2018), "Work grit as a moderator of politics perceptions: Workplace outcomes relationships: a three-study convergent investigation", Career Development International, Vol. 23 No. 6/7, pp. 576-594. https://doi.org/10.1108/CDI-09-2018-0247

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Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

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