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“Effect of milk thistle addition (Silybum Marianum L.) on marinated herring (Clupea Harengus L.) meat”

Andrzej Ochrem (Department of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Ethology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Dominika Kułaj (Department of Animal Reproduction, Anatomy and Genomics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Joanna Pokorska (Department of Animal Reproduction, Anatomy and Genomics, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Justyna Żychlińska-Buczek (Department of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Ethology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Piotr Zapletal (Department of Animal Genetics, Breeding and Ethology, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Ewa Drąg-Kozak (Department of Animal Nutrition and Biotechnology, and Fisheries, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)
Ewa Łuszczek-Trojnar (Department of Animal Nutrition and Biotechnology, and Fisheries, University of Agriculture in Krakow, Kraków, Poland)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 8 March 2021

Issue publication date: 29 June 2021

316

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to analyse the quality changes in marinated herring meat depending on the moment of adding milk thistle.

Design/methodology/approach

One control (C) and two experimental groups were investigated: MH (milk thistle added to a marinade solution) and FH (fillets rubbed with milk thistle before marination). The basic chemical composition, the meat colour, heavy metals concentration, fatty acids profile, quality of lipids and antioxidant capacity were determined.

Findings

The occurrence of Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn was higher in the experimental group than in the control group throughout the marinating process. The peroxide value was higher from the first day in the control group than in the experimental groups. On the last day of the study, the peroxide value in the control group exceeded the maximum acceptable value. The highest level of Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances was determined in the control group on the first day, and the lowest in the FH group. On the first day, the highest percentage of DPPH (2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical quenching was recorded in the FH group.

Originality/value

The results are the first to find that the addition of milk thistle to herring fillets in marinating process maintains or even improves the quality of the marinades. The process of previously coating the fillets in milk thistle and then marinating achieves a lower peroxide value, higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher content of elements such as iron and manganese, which are very valuable for human health.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Funding: This Research was financed by the Ministry of Science and Higher Education of the Republic of Poland project no. BM-4277/2017; subvention no. SUB. 215-D202 and no. SUB. 021500-D015.

Citation

Ochrem, A., Kułaj, D., Pokorska, J., Żychlińska-Buczek, J., Zapletal, P., Drąg-Kozak, E. and Łuszczek-Trojnar, E. (2021), "“Effect of milk thistle addition (Silybum Marianum L.) on marinated herring (Clupea Harengus L.) meat”", British Food Journal, Vol. 123 No. 7, pp. 2537-2554. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-09-2020-0829

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021, Emerald Publishing Limited

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