To read the full version of this content please select one of the options below:

Trust in and through labelling – a systematic review and critique

Emma Tonkin (Department of Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
Annabelle M Wilson (Department of Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
John Coveney (Department of Public Health, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia)
Trevor Webb (Behaviour and Regulatory Analysis Section, Food Standards Australia/New Zealand, Canberra, Australia)
Samantha B Meyer (School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada)

British Food Journal

ISSN: 0007-070X

Article publication date: 5 January 2015

Abstract

Purpose

Distrust of conventional food supply systems impacts consumer food choice. This in turn has implications for consumer nutrition outcomes and acceptance of expert advice regarding food and health. The research exploring consumer trust is found across a broad range of research streams, and is not cohesive in topic or approach. The purpose of this paper is to synthesise the disparate literature exploring the interaction between food labelling and consumer trust to determine what is known, and gaps in knowledge regarding food labelling and consumer trust.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search of trust and food labelling literature was conducted, with study results synthesised and integrated. Studies were then critically analysed for the conceptualisation of the consumer, the label, and their interaction with a framework developed using social theories of trust.

Findings

In total, 27 studies were identified. It was found that not only is the current literature predominantly atheoretical, but the conceptualisation of labelling has been limited.

Research limitations/implications

Further empirical research is needed to enable a more comprehensive understanding of the role food labelling plays in influencing consumer trust in food systems.

Originality/value

This research develops a conceptualisation of the dual roles food labelling may play in influencing consumer trust in food systems. It distinguishes between trust in food labelling itself, and the trust consumers develop in the food supply system through food labelling. The novel theoretical model and synthesis provide a foundation upon which future research may be conducted.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

ET receives an Australian Postgraduate Award to complete her doctoral studies. The funder had no role in the research process. No other funding was sought for the project.

Citation

Tonkin, E., Wilson, A.M., Coveney, J., Webb, T. and Meyer, S.B. (2015), "Trust in and through labelling – a systematic review and critique", British Food Journal, Vol. 117 No. 1, pp. 318-338. https://doi.org/10.1108/BFJ-07-2014-0244

Publisher

:

Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2015, Emerald Group Publishing Limited