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An evaluation of the staff training within the trauma and self injury (TASI) programme in the National High Secure Healthcare Service for Women (NHSHSW)

Kate Robertson (Medical student at School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)
Sue Elcock (Consultant Forensic Psychiatrist at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Woodbeck, UK)
Chris Milburn (Forensic Psychologist at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Woodbeck, UK)
Phyllis Annesley (Consultant Clinical Psychologist at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Woodbeck, UK)
Jane Jones (Psychologist at Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust, Woodbeck, UK)
Birgit A. Völlm (Clinical Associate Professor at Section of Forensic Mental Health, Division of Psychiatry, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK)

The Journal of Forensic Practice

ISSN: 2050-8794

Article publication date: 10 May 2013

299

Abstract

Purpose

Patients in the National High Secure Healthcare Service for Women have a high prevalence of trauma and self injury. This highlights the need for specialised training of staff dealing with such women. The aim of this study was to evaluate the trauma and self injury (TASI) training programme on staff knowledge and skills.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 135 nurses and nursing assistants participated in the TASI two‐day training course. Questionnaires allowing for quantitative and qualitative data collection were completed before and after the training. Training and confidence levels in dealing with women who self‐harm prior to the training were identified and the impact of the programme was assessed.

Findings

The majority of staff had not received any previous training on trauma and self injury. There was an increased level of confidence in working with trauma and self injury following training and staff reported an increased ability to ask for support. Self‐perceived competence improved to a greater extent in those who had not received previous training compared to those who had.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' data is limited to self‐report. Future research should use objective measures to evaluate the impact of staff training.

Practical implications

A relatively short training programme focusing on trauma and self injury appears to improve staff confidence, understanding and competence in working with women patients in a high secure setting. Similar training programmes might also be beneficial in different patient groups with complex backgrounds and behaviours.

Originality/value

This is the first report on a training programme focussing on women in high secure care who self‐harm and have experienced trauma.

Keywords

Citation

Robertson, K., Elcock, S., Milburn, C., Annesley, P., Jones, J. and Völlm, B.A. (2013), "An evaluation of the staff training within the trauma and self injury (TASI) programme in the National High Secure Healthcare Service for Women (NHSHSW)", The Journal of Forensic Practice, Vol. 15 No. 2, pp. 141-150. https://doi.org/10.1108/14636641311322322

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2013, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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