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Subjective wellbeing, work‐school conflict and proactive coping among Nigerian non‐traditional students

D.O. Adebayo (Department of Psychology, Kwantlen University College, Surrey, Canada)
A.M. Sunmola (Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria)
I.B. Udegbe (Department of Psychology, Faculty of the Social Sciences, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria)

Career Development International

ISSN: 1362-0436

Publication date: 1 August 2008

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of participating in two domains, work and school, on the subjective wellbeing (SWB) and work‐school conflict (WSC), as well as the moderating role of proactive coping between WSC and SWB among Nigerian nontraditional students.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross‐sectional survey, data are collected from a total of 141 non‐traditional Master's in Managerial Psychology students at a university located in the South West of Nigeria.

Findings

Results of hierarchical multiple regression analysis reveal that work status is inversely related to SWB and positively related to WSC. Results also confirm the moderating role of coping; such that, as perceived WSC increased, non‐traditional students with moderate to high levels of coping reported greater SWB than those with low coping skills.

Research limitations/implications

Statements on causality, with respect to the present findings, must be made with caution because of the self‐report nature of the study. Further, a global challenge of WSC was adopted in this study; nevertheless, one cannot underestimate the distinctive pattern of WSC that characterised Nigerian non‐traditional students. These could be explored in future studies to further enrich the literature on work‐school obligations and health outcomes.

Practical implications

Results of the present study suggest the need for employers' support as well as universities' flexibility to the needs of non‐traditional students.

Originality/value

The study fills a void in the literature, linking fulfillment of work‐school obligations to health‐related issues among adults (non‐traditional students) in an African setting.

Keywords

Citation

Adebayo, D.O., Sunmola, A.M. and Udegbe, I.B. (2008), "Subjective wellbeing, work‐school conflict and proactive coping among Nigerian non‐traditional students", Career Development International, Vol. 13 No. 5, pp. 440-455. https://doi.org/10.1108/13620430810891464

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2008, Emerald Group Publishing Limited