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Supported Employment in Britain

Stephen Beyer (Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities, University of Wales College of Medicine)
Mark Kilsby (Welsh Centre for Learning Disabilities, University of Wales College of Medicine)

Tizard Learning Disability Review

ISSN: 1359-5474

Article publication date: 1 April 1997

Abstract

This paper describes supported employment, its growth as an alternative to traditional day services and research which indicates potentially beneficial outcomes in the areas of increased employee income, social integration, satisfaction, engagement in activity, employer satisfaction, and in the relationship between financial costs and savings. Outcomes may be reduced due to welfare benefit restrictions that hamper transition into employment, and more part‐time jobs are found as a result in the UK compared to the USA. Providers face problems with low expectations among carers, lack of knowledge of disability among employers, and their funding is precarious. If people with severe disabilities are not to be excluded from supported employment, commissioners need to consider the outcomes they require and the priority needs of clients when setting day service contracts.

Citation

Beyer, S. and Kilsby, M. (1997), "Supported Employment in Britain", Tizard Learning Disability Review, Vol. 2 No. 2, pp. 6-14. https://doi.org/10.1108/13595474199700012

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1997, MCB UP Limited