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Something old, something used: Determinants of women's purchase of vintage fashion vs second‐hand fashion

Marie‐Cécile Cervellon (International University of Monaco, Monte‐Carlo, Principality of Monaco)
Lindsey Carey (Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, UK)
Trine Harms (International University of Monaco, Monte‐Carlo, Principality of Monaco)

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management

ISSN: 0959-0552

Article publication date: 9 November 2012

17046

Abstract

Purpose

Vintage has been a growing trend in clothing recently, leading to major fashion brands launching collections inspired by vintage pieces or luxury haute‐couture houses digging into their archives to revive past designs. Yet, as this market develops, little is known about the profile of the consumer and the motivations to purchase vintage. This paper aims to explore the veracity of a number of assumptions relating to vintage consumption, equating it to the consumption of used, previously owned clothes by nostalgic prone, environmentally‐friendly or value‐conscious consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach including structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed in this research using data collected from 103 women (screened on past second‐hand purchases). Vintage clothes were defined as pieces dating back from the 1920s to the 1980s. Second hand clothes were defined as modern used clothes.

Findings

The results show that the main antecedents to vintage consumption are fashion involvement and nostalgia proneness as well as need for uniqueness through the mediation of treasure hunting. In contrast, second‐hand consumption is directly driven by frugality. Eco‐consciousness plays an indirect role through bargain hunting. In essence, the thrill of the hunt is present for vintage and for second hand consumption. Yet, while vintage consumers shop for a unique piece with history, second‐hand consumers shop for a unique piece at a good price. Additionally, the main characteristics of vintage fashion consumers are a higher level of education and higher income whereas age is not directly related to the purchase of vintage pieces.

Originality/value

The paper discusses the relevance of second‐hand stores repositioning as vintage based on vintage and second‐hand consumers' profiles. Also, the need to educate consumers on the role of second‐hand consumption in a pro‐environmental lifestyle is highlighted.

Keywords

Citation

Cervellon, M., Carey, L. and Harms, T. (2012), "Something old, something used: Determinants of women's purchase of vintage fashion vs second‐hand fashion", International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, Vol. 40 No. 12, pp. 956-974. https://doi.org/10.1108/09590551211274946

Publisher

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Emerald Group Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2012, Emerald Group Publishing Limited

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