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Employees’ perceived organizational instrumentality: an examination of the gender differences

Thomas Li‐Ping Tang (Department of Management and Marketing, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA)
Marc G. Singer (Department of Management and Marketing, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA)
Sharon Roberts (Department of Psychology, Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee, USA)

Journal of Managerial Psychology

ISSN: 0268-3946

Article publication date: 1 August 2000

Abstract

The authors collected data from 295 randomly selected employees, four months after the company’s first labor union certification election. Results of separate multiple regression analyses suggested that job security, extrinsic job satisfaction, and organization‐based self‐esteem (OBSE) were predictors of organizational instrumentality for both males and females. For men, the division where they work, low desire to change, and low consideration were related to their organizational instrumentality, whereas for women, low income, the Japanese management style, and the Protestant Work Ethic were related to their organizational instrumentality. Non‐professional men had a stronger belief that money represents their achievement than professional men. Professional women had a stronger interest in intrinsic job satisfaction than non‐professional women. Both male and female professionals valued Japanese management style. Results are discussed in light of managers’ efforts in satisfying employees’ needs and union leaders’ efforts in organizing their targets.

Keywords

Citation

Li‐Ping Tang, T., Singer, M.G. and Roberts, S. (2000), "Employees’ perceived organizational instrumentality: an examination of the gender differences", Journal of Managerial Psychology, Vol. 15 No. 5, pp. 378-406. https://doi.org/10.1108/02683940010337112

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MCB UP Ltd

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