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How fats and carbohydrates in familiar foods contribute to everyday satiety by their sensory and physiological actions

L.A. Dibsdall (Food and Nutrition Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK)
C.J. Wainwright (Food and Nutrition Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK)
D.A. Booth (Food and Nutrition Laboratory, School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK)
N.W. Read (Centre for Human Nutrition, University of Sheffield, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, UK)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Article publication date: 1 October 1996

475

Abstract

Duodenal action of rapidly digested carbohydrate can induce an intense satiation shortly after the meal, which conditions down the volume of food eaten in the later part of the meal. In contrast, after a meal rich in spreading fat, separation of fat above the aqueous contents of the stomach is liable to delay the fat’s emptying and hence its contact with satiety receptors in the small intestine; eaters are therefore unlikely to learn to eat less of a menu rich in separated fat. Yet the delayed emptying may prolong the period of digestion and absorption of separated fat beyond that for the same amount of fat emulsified or bound in the aqueous phase. Hence, separating fat might help to delay better the rise of appetite for the next meal several hours later. These ideas explain some of the diversity of claims about satiation from fats in foods. Observes how individuals learn from the post‐ingestional effects on appetite of variants of the foods they choose routinely.

Keywords

Citation

Dibsdall, L.A., Wainwright, C.J., Booth, D.A. and Read, N.W. (1996), "How fats and carbohydrates in familiar foods contribute to everyday satiety by their sensory and physiological actions", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 96 No. 5, pp. 37-43. https://doi.org/10.1108/00346659610129224

Publisher

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MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1996, MCB UP Limited

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