Nutritional effects of microwave cooking

Anne Lassen (Institute of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, National Food Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark)
Lars Ovesen (Institute of Food Chemistry and Nutrition, National Food Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark)

Nutrition & Food Science

ISSN: 0034-6659

Publication date: 1 August 1995

Abstract

Several studies have shown that microwave cooking, if properly used, does not change the nutrient content of foods to a larger extent than conventional heating. In fact, suggests that there is a tendency towards greater retention of many micronutrients with microwaving, probably due to the shorter preparation time. Does not describe non‐thermal effects. The main problem with microwaving is the uneven heating of the food, which has raised concern regarding microbiological safety. Microwaving infant formula and breast milk has become increasingly popular. The content of nutrients and antibacterial factors in milk are maintained unchanged provided the final temperature does not exceed 60°C.

Keywords

Citation

Lassen, A. and Ovesen, L. (1995), "Nutritional effects of microwave cooking", Nutrition & Food Science, Vol. 95 No. 4, pp. 8-10. https://doi.org/10.1108/00346659510088654

Publisher

:

MCB UP Ltd

Copyright © 1995, MCB UP Limited

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