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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Camila A. Alire

This article aims to dispel the perception that academic libraries do not need to market their services and resources; to acquaint academic librarians to the concept of

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5371

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to dispel the perception that academic libraries do not need to market their services and resources; to acquaint academic librarians to the concept of wordofmouth marketing and its potential for academic libraries; and to share a wordofmouth marketing academic library success story.

Design/methodology/approach

Includes an introduction to the concept of wordofmouth marketing and its application to academic libraries. Also includes how one academic library successfully employed this marketing technique.

Findings

Provides an introduction to the wordofmouth marketing strategy and its usefulness for academic libraries. Shares a real‐life success story of academic library wordofmouth marketing.

Practical implications

Useful as an introduction for academic librarians to a specific type of marketing strategy that works well in a college/university setting and provides some successful techniques of wordofmouth marketing for academic libraries.

Originality/value

Helps fill a void relative to using marketing strategies in an academic library setting and offers suggestions on how to do this successfully.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2010

Long‐Yi Lin and Ching‐Yuh Lu

The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of corporate image and relationship marketing on trust, the impact of trust on consumer purchase intention…

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16659

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of corporate image and relationship marketing on trust, the impact of trust on consumer purchase intention, and the moderating effects of wordofmouth between the influence of trust on consumer purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Consumers of an online travel agency in Taiwan aged over 18 were taken as the research sample. Primary data were collected through convenience sampling. Regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The main findings are: corporate image has a significantly positive influence on trust, and commodity image has the most significant influence on trust, followed by functional image and institution image; structural and financial relationship marketing has significantly positive influence on trust, and structural relationship marketing has greater influence on trust compared with financial relationship marketing; trust has a significantly positive influence on consumer purchase intention; and positive wordofmouth has a moderating effect between the influences of trust on consumer purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include: the data obtained in this study only reflected the correlations and cause and effect among the variables studied during a specific period of time; this paper only focused on tour agencies; consumers who used only the most popular online tour agencies were selected. Therefore, the samples might involve some bias. The implications of this study include: different types of corporate image will have different levels of influence on consumer trust. There is a need to support the previous study that relationship marketing has a significantly positive influence on consumer trust. The moderating effects of positive wordofmouth between the influences of trust on consumer purchase intention must be examined. The influence of trust on purchase intention must be considered.

Practical implications

The study findings reveal the need and importance for a company to improve corporate image continuously. The study indicates the need to emphasize the use of critical relationship marketing and to realize the nature and importance of the moderating effect of wordofmouth.

Originality/value

The value of this study is combined theory and practical and finding four management implications and three practical implications.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 65 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

David Stokes, Sameera Ali Syed and Wendy Lomax

Owner‐managers of small businesses invariably cite word of mouth recommendations as the principal way in which they attract new customers. Marketing theory is…

Abstract

Owner‐managers of small businesses invariably cite word of mouth recommendations as the principal way in which they attract new customers. Marketing theory is under‐developed in this field with little empirical evidence about the recommending behaviour of small business customers and referral groups. The case study of an independent health club reported here illustrates how these processes can be researched and the results used to influence word of mouth recommendations. The owner‐manager of the club carried out some basic research on his customer base in order to identify the types of members who were most active in recommending the club, and the stimuli that led to recommendations being made. A key finding was that newer members were more likely to recommend than those who had been members for some time, contradicting the implications of relationship marketing theories that long standing customers generate most recommendations. Membership more than doubled following a number of activities designed to increase recommending behaviour. The most important stimuli to recommendations were believed to be involvement with the club, incentives and experiential factors. The case study indicates that word of mouth strategies benefit from research to find out which customers are recommending the business, what they are recommending about the business and what prompts them to do so.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Joanne Procter and Martyn Richards

Defines the pester power phenomenon as the repeated delivery of unwanted requests, arguing however that this is not the main driving influence in purchasing behaviour…

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5444

Abstract

Defines the pester power phenomenon as the repeated delivery of unwanted requests, arguing however that this is not the main driving influence in purchasing behaviour. Shows instead that a large number of highly successful products, notably Harry Potter, became popular not through marketing but via wordofmouth, and the staying power (or stickiness) of a product like Pokemon illustrates the importance of social learning. Recounts the experiment of Stanley Milgram’s chain letter, and the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon game, which shows the amount of connectedness in society. Relates this to diffusion research is central to wordofmouth marketing, and also mentions viral marketing and coolhunting, both of which involve wordofmouth.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Rick Ferguson

The purpose of this paper is to study examples of emerging marketing trends like wordofmouth and viral marketing, and attempt to determine their measurability in terms of

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50395

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study examples of emerging marketing trends like wordofmouth and viral marketing, and attempt to determine their measurability in terms of return on investment (ROI).

Design/methodology/approach

The study examines real life campaigns from well‐known companies and attempt to measure consumer response beyond merely viewing or participating in the campaign. How much of an actionable response can be evoked and measured from viral and wordofmouth campaigns? Testimonials and commentary from marketers practicing these methods and the pundits that attempt to gauge the effectiveness.

Findings

The paper finds that wordofmouth or viral marketing efforts are not always a sure bet. But a well‐placed, calculated and provocative campaign can spark a firestorm of buzz that sometimes can be effective for years in non‐terminal new mediums like the internet. While the jury is still out on finding hard quantitative ROI measurements for these campaigns, they can produce hefty returns for brand awareness.

Research limitations/implications

Tracking ROI for viral marketing and wordofmouth marketing campaigns remains an inexact and difficult science.

Practical implications

The paper suggest following the included Viral Commandments when creating a wordofmouth campaign to ensure marketing resources are put to highest and best use. It also suggests focusing on identification of the consumer as a vital step to build advocacy. Viral marketing should not anchor marketing strategy, but when used effectively can be an important ace‐up‐the‐sleeve.

Originality/value

The paper explores some recognizable viral marketing campaigns and studies the effects they had on product sales, consumer advocacy and brand awareness. It teaches important factors to consider when developing wordofmouth marketing: who is doing it well, who is not, what lasting effects can a campaign deliver, and are there any effective ways to measure return on investment?

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2021

Hong Zhao, Yi Huang and Zongshui Wang

This paper aims to systematically find the main research differences and similarities between social media and social networks in marketing research using the bibliometric…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to systematically find the main research differences and similarities between social media and social networks in marketing research using the bibliometric perspective and provides suggestions for firms to improve their marketing strategies effectively.

Design/methodology/approach

The methods of co-word analysis and network analysis have been used to analyze the two research fields of social media and social networks. Specifically, this study selects 2,424 articles from 27 marketing academic journals present in the database Web of Science, ranging from January 1, 1996 to August 8, 2020.

Findings

The results show that social networks and social media are both research hotspots within the discipline of marketing research. The different intimacy nodes of social networks are more complex than social media. Additionally, the research scope of social networks is broader than social media in marketing research as shown by the keyword co-occurrence analysis. The overlap between social media and social networks in marketing research is reflected in the strong focus on their mixed mutual effects.

Originality/value

This paper explores the differences and similarities between social networks and social media in marketing research from the bibliometric perspective and provides a developing trend of their research hotspots in social media and social networks marketing research by keyword co-occurrence analysis and cluster analysis. Additionally, this paper provides some suggestions for firms looking to improve the efficiency of their marketing strategies from social and economic perspectives.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Nikunj Kumar Jain, Shampy Kamboj, Vinod Kumar and Zillur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumer-brand relationships affect brand loyalty and word of mouth when mediated by brand trust considering online brand…

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5309

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumer-brand relationships affect brand loyalty and word of mouth when mediated by brand trust considering online brand communities on social media platforms.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model is developed, depicting the impact of customer-brand relationships on brand loyalty and word of mouth via brand trust. The conceptual model is validated using partial least squares structural equation modeling and data for which are collected online through a structured questionnaire from a sample of 131 brand community members in North Capital Region of India.

Findings

Findings of the present study revealed that brand trust partially mediated between the involvement and commitment variables of customer-brand relationships, and brand loyalty and word of mouth. However, the link between satisfaction variable of customer-brand relationships, and brand loyalty and word of mouth via brand trust was found insignificant.

Originality/value

The present study provides novel insight to understand consumer-brand relationships on social media platforms.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Renan Tan Tavukçuoğlu

People tend to rely on the recommendations of people they know more than any other advertisement medium. Friend-recommendation and online reviews are the primary criteria…

Abstract

People tend to rely on the recommendations of people they know more than any other advertisement medium. Friend-recommendation and online reviews are the primary criteria considered before making most purchase decisions. Increase in the number of media channels, having too many product options to choose from and the massive amount of advertisement pieces lead the way to the success of word of mouth once again. With recent developments in technology and increase in the number of social media tools and users, word-of-mouth marketing (WOMM) became more important than ever. There are many ways to empower positive word of mouth on behalf of corporate brands. The present chapter aims to summarise the key points of WOMM and provide the readers with a roadmap and tools for successful WOMM applications.

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Manuela López, María Sicilia and Carmen Hidalgo-Alcázar

Companies are interested in engaging consumers in spreading the word about their products or brands. Although more and more studies are analysing word of mouth marketing

Abstract

Purpose

Companies are interested in engaging consumers in spreading the word about their products or brands. Although more and more studies are analysing word of mouth marketing (WOMM), the topic is still very recent, thus very little is known about how to develop a WOMM campaign effectively. This chapter develops a literature review on WOMM in social media for better understanding on how to manage WOMM.

Methodology/approach

The studies reviewed have allowed us to identify the main decisions that should be taken when planning a WOMM campaign: the selection of the seed, the type of message and the inclusion of incentives.

Findings

We identify the two types of objectives that companies can follow with WOMM: information diffusion or consumers’ persuasion. Depending on the campaign objectives, the strategy to be used in order to be successful is different.

Social implications

This chapter can be useful to both, marketers, by showing them how to develop a WOMM campaign effectively; and researchers, by showing them the main gaps on WOMM that should be addressed in future studies.

Originality/value

This is one of the first attempts to review the literature and organize knowledge on WOMM. Concepts that have been treated as synonymous by many researchers such as opinion leaders, market mavens, innovative consumers, and hubs are clarified and distinguished one from the other which may help in improving previous knowledge on this field.

Details

Advertising in New Formats and Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-312-9

Keywords

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