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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Albert Ochien’g Abang’a, Venancio Tauringana, David Wang’ombe and Laura Obwona Achiro

This paper aims to report the results of an investigation into the effect of aggregate and individual corporate governance factors on the financial performance of state-owned…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the results of an investigation into the effect of aggregate and individual corporate governance factors on the financial performance of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in Kenya.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses balanced panel data regression analysis on a sample of 45 SOEs in Kenya for a four-year period (2015–2018).

Findings

The panel data analysis results show that board meetings, board skill and gender diversity individual provisions of corporate governance are significantly and positively associated with capital budget realization ratio (CBRR). Moreover, the study finds that aggregate corporate governance disclosure index, board sub-committees, board size and independent non-executive directors are positive but insignificantly related to CBRR.

Research limitations/implications

The current study is based on secondary data, other methods of knowledge inquiry such as interviews and questionnaires may provide additional insights on the effectiveness of corporate governance on financial performance.

Practical implications

Overall, the results imply that corporate governance influences the performance of SOEs in Kenya. The results suggest that Mwongozo Code of Corporate Governance provisions should be changed to increase the number of women representations on board and the number of directors with doctoral qualifications because of their positive impact on the financial performance of SOEs in Kenya. Also, policymakers with remit over SOEs should re-evaluate why other corporate governance appear not to have an impact with a view of making the necessary changes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the dearth of literature on the efficacy of corporate governance on the financial performance of SOEs in developing countries.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Lyton Chithambo and Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether four corporate governance mechanisms (board size, non-executive directors, ownership concentration and directors’ share…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether four corporate governance mechanisms (board size, non-executive directors, ownership concentration and directors’ share ownership) influence the extent of greenhouse gas (GHG) disclosure.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a mixed-methods approach based on a sample of 62 FTSE 1,000 firms. Firstly, the authors surveyed the senior management of 62 UK-listed firms in the FTSE 1,000 index to determine whether the corporate governance mechanisms influence their GHG disclosure decisions. Secondly, the authors used ordinary least squares (OLS) regression to model the relationship between the corporate governance mechanisms and GHG disclosure scores of the 62 firms.

Findings

The survey and OLS regression results both suggest that corporate governance mechanisms (board size and NEDs) do not influence GHG disclosures. However, the results of the two approaches differ, in that the survey results suggest that corporate governance mechanisms (ownership concentration and directors’ share ownership) do not influence the extent of GHG disclosure, while the opposite is true with the OLS regression results.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of 62 firms is small which could affect the generalisability of the study. The mixed results mean that more mixed-methods approach is needed to improve the understanding of the role of corporate governance in GHG disclosures.

Originality/value

The use of mixed-methods to examine whether corporate governance mechanisms determine the extent of GHG voluntary disclosure provides additional insights not provided in prior studies.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2019

David Mutua Mathuva, Venancio Tauringana and Fredrick J. Otieno Owino

The nature of corporate governance (CG) mechanisms in an entity may influence the timeliness of the audited annual report. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the “quality”…

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Abstract

Purpose

The nature of corporate governance (CG) mechanisms in an entity may influence the timeliness of the audited annual report. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the “quality” of CG in a firm has a significant association with the time it takes the audited annual report and financial statements to be released.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a set of 543 firm-year observations over the period 2007–2016, the authors examine whether a validated CG-Index is associated with audit report delay (ARD). The authors employ both granular as well as aggregated approaches to the analyses. In addition, the authors include control variables known to have an association with ARD in the panel data regressions.

Findings

The findings, which are robust for self-selection among other checks, reveal that financial expertise in the audit committee, board size, board meetings and independence in the board are associated with longer ARDs. Some CG attributes such as board diversity (i.e. women and different nationalities in the board) are associated with improved timeliness of the annual reports. The results also reveal that a longer tenure for independent directors in the board is associated with a shorter ARD. Overall, the authors find that the composite CG score has a positive influence on the timeliness of annual reports.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on listed companies in one developing country. Additional studies focusing on other jurisdictions could yield more results.

Practical implications

The study is useful in highlighting those CG characteristics firms should focus on toward the attainment of timely corporate reporting to aid in decision making by users.

Originality/value

The study is unique since it emphasizes the importance of focusing on an aggregate CG-Index, and the contribution of the CG-Index toward the timeliness of annual reports.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 December 2021

Juma Bananuka, Venancio Tauringana and Zainabu Tumwebaze

The objective of the study is to investigate the association between intellectual capital (IC) and sustainability reporting practices in Uganda. The study further examines how…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to investigate the association between intellectual capital (IC) and sustainability reporting practices in Uganda. The study further examines how individual IC elements (human, structural and relational capital) affect sustainability reporting practices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs a questionnaire to collect data. Data are analyzed using multiple regression analysis.

Findings

Results indicate that IC is significantly associated with sustainability reporting practices. The study also found that human capital and relational capital elements have a positive effect on sustainability reporting practices while structural capital element does not have a significant effect.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that examine sustainability reporting by financial services firms in a country where the capital markets are still in their infancy and the major source of external financing are the banks. Its major contribution lies in its focus on how the key IC components explain variations in sustainability reporting practices among financial service firms in Uganda.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Venancio Tauringana, Dragana Radicic, Alan Kirkpatrick and Renata Konadu

This paper aims to report the results of an investigation into the relationship between corporate boards and the likelihood of a firm being convicted of an environmental offence…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report the results of an investigation into the relationship between corporate boards and the likelihood of a firm being convicted of an environmental offence in the United Kingdom (UK).

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses binary logistics regression analysis to model the relationship between corporate boards and the likelihood of a firm being convicted of an environmental offence in the UK, controlling for firm size, financial leverage and profitability.

Findings

The results suggest that the likelihood of a firm being convicted of an environmental offence increases with board size but decreases with the presence of a woman on the board. No support is found for the authors’ hypotheses about the proportion of outside directors and the presence of a lawyer on the board. Marginal effects’ results also show that adding one member to the board increases the chance of a firm being convicted for an environmental offence by 4.2 per cent, while having a woman on the board decreases the likelihood of a firm being convicted of an environmental offence by 31.8 per cent.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of 55 firms is small which could affect the generalisability of the study.

Originality/value

The study uses proprietary data obtained from the UK Environmental Agency to provide evidence for the first time how corporate boards affect the chances of a listed firm being convicted of an environmental offence in the UK.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2024

Acheampong Owusu, Tauringana Venancio and Nicholas Asare

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of manager attributes and psychological factors on the adoption of sustainability reporting (SR) among small and medium-sized…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of manager attributes and psychological factors on the adoption of sustainability reporting (SR) among small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a cross-sectional data gathered using questionnaires administered to managers of SMEs in Ghana. The data is analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results reveal that SME managers with requisite educational qualifications and knowledge about sustainability accounting adopt SR. The attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control of managers of SMEs on issues of sustainability also affect the adoption of SR. However, SMEs with old and long-serving managers do not adopt SR. SMEs with manager attributes such as professional education, gender and religious affiliation do not appear to adopt SR.

Practical implications

There is the need for regulators and other stakeholders to sensitize, persuade and provide awareness, training and educational certification to support managers of SMEs to enable them to adopt SR.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on SR by offering a clear understanding of how manager attributes and psychological factors influence the adoption of SR by SMEs in developing countries.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2018

Ismail Adelopo, Robert Lloydking and Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of an investigation into the relationship between bank-specific, macroeconomic factors and bank profitability before…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the results of an investigation into the relationship between bank-specific, macroeconomic factors and bank profitability before (1999-2006), during (2007-2009), and after (2010-2013) the financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Economic Community of West African States’ bank panel data from 1999 to 2013, the paper used fixed effect models. The panel model includes bank-specific determinants (size, cost management, and liquidity), industry level, and macroeconomic variables.

Findings

Panel data analyses results show that there is a significant relationship between bank-specific determinants (size, cost management, and liquidity) and bank profitability (ROA) before, during, and after the financial crisis. However, the relationships between other bank-specific (capital strength, credit risk, and market power), macroeconomic (gross domestic product and inflation) determinants are sensitive to both periods of analysis (before, during, and after financial crisis) and bank profitability measure used (ROA or NIM).

Originality/value

Overall, these results suggest that the financial crisis did not affect the relationships between some bank-specific determinants and bank profitability.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Babajide Oyewo, Venancio Tauringana, Babajide Moses Omikunle and Olusola Owoyele

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational design elements (i.e. quality of management accounting skills and performance management system, PMS)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between organizational design elements (i.e. quality of management accounting skills and performance management system, PMS), management accounting practice (MAP) sophistication and organizational competitiveness using the Global Management Accounting Principles (GMAP) framework.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data was obtained through a structured questionnaire from 131 Nigerian firms. Measures of the quality of management accounting skills, robustness of PMS structure, MAP sophistication and organizational competitiveness were derived from the GMAP framework. Structural equation modelling was applied to explore the complexity of relationship among variables.

Findings

While the quality of management accounting skills was found to have a positive but insignificant impact on MAP sophistication, the impact of PMS structure on MAP sophistication was positive and significant. MAP sophistication has a positive impact on organizational competitiveness, but the magnitude of its contribution appears to depend on the quality of management accounting skills and the robustness of PMS structure. The inability of MAP sophistication to exert much influence on organizational competitiveness is attributable to the low contribution of management accounting skills. The result supports the proposition that performance is optimized when all organizational design elements are concurrently improved.

Practical implications

The study shows that organizations need to critically look into the quality of skills possessed by personnel in the accounting function, as all organizational design elements must be given equal importance to achieve the best results.

Originality/value

The study contributes to knowledge by investigating the quality of management accounting skills and the robustness of PMS as organizational design elements affecting MAP and organizational competitiveness using the GMAP framework. The study operationalizes some elements of the GMAP framework by developing measurements that can be used by future studies.

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi and Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools. The study…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools. The study also sought to determine whether MAPR and governing boards (board size, gender diversity and frequency of board meetings) influence the perceived competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and correlational. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of 200 secondary schools. The data were analysed through ordinary least squares regression using Statistical Package for Social Scientists.

Findings

There are wide variations in MAP in terms of the extent to which the schools employ management accounting techniques. Also, MAP and governing boards have a predictive force on the schools’ competitive advantage. However, governing board’s size has no effect on competitive advantage. In terms of the control variables, the results suggest that while government school ownership has a positive effect on competitive advantage, the school’s size has no effect. There are intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size.

Research limitations/implications

The present study was limited to the secondary schools in Uganda which limits generalisability. Still, the results offer important implications for secondary schools’ governing boards, owners and for similar African governments who are a major stakeholder in the secondary school education system. The exact mechanism by which intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size impact competitive advantage is not been explored in this paper. Future researchers may direct research effort in this endeavour.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate use of MAPR in secondary schools and to provide evidence of their efficacy.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it aims to identify managerial perceptions-based research determinants of sustainability reporting. Second, it sets out to evaluate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it aims to identify managerial perceptions-based research determinants of sustainability reporting. Second, it sets out to evaluate the impact of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) efforts in increasing SR in developing countries. Third, the researcher argues for the adoption of management perceptions research evidence-based practices (EBP) to address SR challenges in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was undertaken using a desk-based review of management perceptions-based research literature on the determinants of SR. The impact of GRI efforts in increasing adoption of SR was undertaken through both desk-based research and descriptive analysis of data obtained from the GRI database from 2014 to 2019 relating to 107 developing countries. The call for the adoption of management perceptions research EBP is based on a critical analysis of both the management perceptions of the determinants of SR research and evaluation the impact of GRI efforts to increase SR in developing countries.

Findings

Training, legislation, issuing of guidance, stakeholder pressure, awareness campaigns, market and public pressure were identified as some of the determinants of SR. The evaluation of the impact of GRI efforts shows they had limited impact on increasing SR in developing countries. Research needed to adopt management perceptions research EBP is identified.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conceptual. Management perceptions-based research is needed in more developing countries to better understand the determinants of SR and identify the most effective policies or practices to address related challenges.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to the calls to make academic research more relevant to policy formulation. In particular, the proposal for research needed to inform EBP adoption to address SR challenges in developing countries is new.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

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