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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Tony Renshaw, Richard Stevens and Paul D. Denton

The purpose of this paper is to report research undertaken in developing improved understandings of players' interaction and emotional experience of electronic gaming.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report research undertaken in developing improved understandings of players' interaction and emotional experience of electronic gaming.

Design/methodology/approach

The research explores a variety of techniques designed to explore user/player insights into interaction, through consideration of user satisfaction, engagement or immersion. Non‐invasive eye tracking technology is used to augment data derived from these more traditional approaches to the assessment of emotional responses. It is postulated by the authors that from this exploration of insights related to usability, improved games level learning and recognition of new inherent revenue opportunities based around in‐game advertising, will be better understood.

Findings

As the number of participants in this pilot study is small it is perhaps too early to draw firm conclusions from the data collected. However, the study does establish that it is technically possible to configure the eye‐tracker and ancillary equipment to record the eye movements of game players. The study has uncovered further areas worthy of investigation such as the influence on eye movement of, player skill and experience, the nature of activities within the game, and the best ways to indicate the importance of key objects within a game.

Practical implications

The methodology presented within this paper shows that the application of eye‐tracking solutions can be used to evaluate engagement in games. The findings provide interesting and innovative ways for the games designers and in‐game advertisers to improve their performance.

Originality/value

From an academic perspective, this research is innovative in the way it has developed a methodology for analysis of player engagement within electronic games. This methodology offers valuable insights into game design improvement and in‐game advertising opportunities.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1981

HARDLY had the dispute at BL ended and the men had gone back to work amidst universal rejoicing (apart from the more militant of the shop stewards) than several hundred of them…

Abstract

HARDLY had the dispute at BL ended and the men had gone back to work amidst universal rejoicing (apart from the more militant of the shop stewards) than several hundred of them had to be sent back home, rightly on full pay, because of a plague of fleas that had invaded the factory. Talk about scratching for a living…!

Details

Work Study, vol. 30 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

Abstract

Details

Coaching Winning Sales Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-488-1

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1979

Tony Preston

In mid‐1977 the Greater Manchester Reference & Information Sub‐Group (a working party of librarians representing the ten public library authorities in the county) set out to…

Abstract

In mid‐1977 the Greater Manchester Reference & Information Sub‐Group (a working party of librarians representing the ten public library authorities in the county) set out to create an inexpensive but workable local government information service which would be available to any of the local authorities who wished to participate. Of the ten constituent districts, only Stockport had a full‐time local government information officer. One of the main features of Stockport's service was a weekly current awareness bulletin, using input from about a hundred journals. Oldham and Tameside were assisting Stockport by scanning extra journals and providing relevant abstracts and photocopies; in return they were receiving copies of the Stockport bulletin. Tameside staff were using this bulletin to help produce their own irregular information bulletin on a reduced scale and, like Stockport, were supplementing it with a photocopy supply service. Salford had produced independently for two years a fortnightly current awareness bulletin. Provision in the other districts was minimal.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2010

William Gibson

This chapter provides an analysis of the processes of negotiating identity in the production of improvised performance in the jazz rhythm section. I show that, for jazz musicians…

Abstract

This chapter provides an analysis of the processes of negotiating identity in the production of improvised performance in the jazz rhythm section. I show that, for jazz musicians, identity is an important and complex concern that is managed through the frame of their various role functions. This analysis aims to expand upon symbolic interactionist studies of music and to provide a critique of the “discursive” focus on music in social life.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-361-4

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